50 Ways to Never Waste Food Again ::: By Colleen Vanderlinden, Planet Green


By Colleen Vanderlinden, Planet Green

“Use it up, wear it out, make do, or do without” is a favorite adage
in both frugal and green circles, and it is something I strive to live
by. One of the best ways to “use it up” is to think differently about
our food and ways to avoid wasting it. Lloyd wrote a great post a while
back about the statistics for how much food we waste
in the U.S., and the numbers are, frankly, appalling. On average, we
waste 14 percent of our food purchases per year, and the average
American family throws out over 600 dollars of fruit per year. Most of
the food we waste is due to spoilage; we’re buying too much and using
too little of it.

We’ve all had it happen: half the loaf of bread goes stale because no
one wants to eat sandwiches today, and the grapes we bought as healthy
snacks for the kids’ lunches languish in the crisper. With a little
creativity, and an eye toward vanquishing waste in our lives, we can
make use of more of our food before it goes to waste. Here are a few
ideas for you.

Using Up Vegetables

1. Leftover mashed potatoes from dinner? Make them into patty shapes
the next morning and cook them in butter for a pretty good “mock hash
brown.”

2. Don’t toss those trimmed ends from onions, carrots, celery, or
peppers. Store them in your freezer, and once you have a good amount
saved up, add them to a large pot with a few cups of water and make
homemade vegetable broth. This is also a great use for cabbage cores and
corn cobs.

3. Don’t toss broccoli stalks. They can be peeled and sliced, then prepared just like broccoli florets.

4. If you have to dice part of an onion or pepper for a recipe, don’t
waste the rest of it. Chop it up and store it in the freezer for the
next time you need diced onion or peppers.

5. Roasted root vegetable leftovers can be turned into an easy,
simple soup the next day. Add the veggies to a blender, along with
enough broth or water to thin them enough to blend. Heat and enjoy.

6. If you’re preparing squash, don’t toss the seeds. Rinse and roast
them in the oven, just like you would with pumpkin seeds. The taste is
pretty much the same.

7. Celery leaves usually get tossed. There’s a lot of good flavor in
them; chop them up and add them to meatloaf, soups, or stews.

8. Use up tomatoes before they go bad by drying them in the oven. You can then store them in olive oil in the refrigerator (if you plan on using them within a week) or in the freezer.

9. Canning is always a good option. If you’re doing tomatoes, you can use a boiling water bath. If you’re canning any other type of veggie, a pressure canner is necessary for food safety.

10. Before it goes bad, blanch it and toss it in the freezer. This
works for peas, beans, corn, carrots, broccoli, brussels sprouts,
cauliflower, and leafy greens like spinach and kale.

11. Too many zucchini? Make dark chocolate zucchini cake, zucchini bread or muffins. If you don’t want to eat the bread now, bake it and freeze it, then defrost when you’re ready to eat it.

12.Pickle it.
Cucumbers are the first veggie most of us think of pickling, but in
reality, just about any vegetable can be preserved through pickling.

Ideas for Cutting Down on Fruit Waste

13. Make smoothies with fruit before it goes bad. Berries, bananas, and melons are great candidates for this use-up idea.

14. Jam is really easy to make, and will keep for up to a year if you
process the jars in a hot water bath. If you don’t do the water
processing part, you can keep the jam in the refrigerator for a month,
which is a lot longer than the fruits would have lasted.

15. Dry your fruit and store it in the freezer or in airtight containers.

16. Make fruit leather.

17. Make a big fruit salad or “fruit kebabs” for your kids. For some
reason, they seem to eat more fruit if it’s in these “fancier” forms.

18. Use up the fall bounty of apples by making applesauce or apple butter.

19. Don’t throw out those watermelon rinds! Pickled watermelon rind is a pretty tasty treat.

20. Make a fruit crumble out of almost any fruit you have on hand.
Assemble and bake it now, or leave it unbaked and store it in the
freezer for a quick dessert.

The Everest of excrement is actually Mount Everest


  • Everest
  • Rubbish left at one of Mount Everest’s base camps.
    Image: Mary Plage
    Nepal has a stinky situation on its hands.Human waste left by climbers on Mount Everest has become a major problem, and is even threatening the spread of disease, Ang Tshering, the chief of Nepal’s mountaineering association, said, The Associated Press reports.Everest’s climbing season only lasts a measly two months, but nearly 700 climbers brave the world’s tallest peak and not all of them dispose of their trash, urine and feces properly.

    None of Mount Everest’s four base camps, which are located at 17,380 feet, have proper facilities. The camps have tents, equipment, supplies and even cooks, but no toilets. The waste is collected in a drum in a toilet tent, where it is then carried to a lower altitude and disposed.

    But not all climbers use the camps’ facilities to do their business.

    “Climbers usually dig holes in the snow for their toilet use and leave the human waste there,” Tshering told The Associated Press, adding that waste around the base camps has been accumulating for years.

    Away from the base camp, as climbers head toward the 29,035 foot summit, human waste is also an issue.

    “It is a health hazard and the issue needs to be addressed,” said Dawa Steven Sherpa, who has been at the forefront of Everest cleanup expeditions since 2008. Some climbers carry disposable toilet bags with them to the higher camps that don’t have any facilities, Sherpa said.

    FARTHEST SUMMIT I

    The advance base camp for people climbing Mount Everest sits on the mountain’s north slope at about 21,000 feet.

    Image: Dave Watson/Associated Press

    Last year the Nepalese government imposed new rules, which requires climbers to return to the base camp with 17.6 pounds of waste. The weight is an estimate of the average amount of trash climbers accumulate en route.

    The government does not currently have plans to deal with the human waste issue

    The government does not currently have plans to deal with the human waste issue, however Puspa Raj Katuwal, the head of the government’s Mountaineering Department, said officials will strictly monitor it, adding that climbing teams must submit a $4,000 deposit that they will lose if regulations are broken.

    Human fecal waste and trash isn’t the only thing left on the mountainside. According to an article released in 2012 by Smithsonian Magazine, more than 200 human bodies remain frozen on the mountain. Some of them are even used as landmarks.

    More than 4,000 climbers have braved the mountain since its first expedition in 1953.

The Record ~ Toxic Legacy …


girlPollution

http://toxiclegacy.northjersey.com/

I recommend checking out the Mann V Ford post and click on some of the links … the link above is a hidden gem of fierce documentation of corporate excessive use of and possibly the worse abuse of power …

The Global clean-water crisis


the Global clean-water crisis … last call at the Oasis

The Scientists in Jessica Yu’s documentary, about the global clean-water crisis, say that half the world’s population will not have access to adequate drinking water by the year 2025. Deftly constructed and devastating, the film is a stunning eye-opener that will, at the very least, have you taking shorter showers and turning off the tap while you brush your teeth. – jg -vogue

Buy a lady a drink ~~ Stella Artois …. water.org


Today, 750 million people around the world live without access to clean water. This crisis disproportionately affects women, who walk a combined 200 million hours a day to collect water for their families. Stella Artois is supporting Water.org to help solve the global water crisis. Learn how you can help at http://BuyALadyADrink.com