Tag Archives: cheney

Uacceptable !


Yesterday, Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters indicted Cincinnati University Police Officer Ray Tensing on 1st degree murder charges for violently killing 43-year-old Sam DuBose 10 days ago.Unfortunately, what’s shocking about this case is not just the vile racism and brutality of Officer Tensing’s actions, but the fact that he was charged and how quickly.

For every 1,000 people killed by police only 1 police officer is ever convicted of a crime.2 And yesterday’s rare indictment is both an important step forward and a painful reminder of the countless other Black families who have lost a loved one to police violence and will likely never have their day in court. While police are murdering Black people with impunity, our national leaders have done little more than offer superficial reforms at best and endorse systemic racism and abusive policing at worst.3 It’s time to hold their feet to the fire.

Next week, Cleveland will host the 1st Republican presidential debate. We’ve purchased 9 billboards right outside the convention center. Will you chip in $20 to cover the costs and make sure the crisis of discriminatory policing is front and center at this debate and beyond?

Billboard artwork on the police killing of Tamir Rice, Tanisha Anderson and John Crawford

The above images reference the tragic police killings of 12-year-old Tamir Rice, 22-year-old John Crawford, and 37-year-old Tanisha Anderson, respectively.4,5,6 All three were killed by Ohio police in the last year and not one of the abusive and discriminatory police who killed them have faced any criminal charges. In fact, they are all still employed as police officers. And in every single one of these cases it was not the first time these officers had killed or harmed a Black person — and it likely won’t be the last.7

The Department of Justice and local prosecutors that have failed to hold these officers accountable are responsible for the unconscionable loss of Black life we have seen in the past year. Mike Brown, VonDerrit Myers, Eric Garner, Rekia Boyd, Tamir Rice, Tanisha Anderson, Yuvette Henderson, Freddie Gray, Mya Hall, Sandra Bland, Sam DuBose, Kindra Chapman, Ralkina Jones, and Jonathan Sanders, just to name a few. Make no mistake, the challenge before us is centuries old. But the growing awareness around police killings has created a new opportunity to hold our leaders accountable and win the type of transformative change that can finally put an end to this madness.

It’s likely that without these billboards, Republican candidates will ignore systemic racism and discriminatory policing in next week’s debate. That no one will raise the fact that police kill Black Americans at nearly the same rate as Jim Crow era lynchings and more than 175 Black people have been killed by police this year alone.8,9 But we cannot afford to allow this dangerous silence to continue. The billboards around the convention center will honor Tamir, Tanisha and John, while probing debate moderators to ask the questions we need answered:

Does the GOP support responsible body camera policies? Will candidates support a national database documenting police practices? Does the GOP support the federal government continuing to militarize police? How can we expect police to police themselves when one of their own commits a crime? Should cops with a history of racism and abuse still have jobs?We need both parties — Republicans and Democrats — to place the issues of mass incarceration and policing at the center of their policy agendas if we ever hope to see any kind of real change at the federal level.

Billboards in the right location have a great chance of catching the eyes of debate moderators. Click here to hold presidential candidates accountable for addressing discriminatory policing and mass incarceration.

Thanks and peace,

— Rashad, Arisha, Shani, Lyla and the rest of the ColorOfChange.org team
July 30th, 2015

References,

1. “Dashcam and bodycam footage from shooting of Sam Dubose,” Raw Story 07-29-2015
http://act.colorofchange.org/go/5075?t=5&akid=4619.1174326.tI8Ytj

2. “New Study: For Every 1000 People Killed by Police, Only 1 Cop is Convicted of a Crime,” Free Thought Project 05-15-2015
http://act.colorofchange.org/go/5085?t=7&akid=4619.1174326.tI8Ytj

3. “Jeb Bush Says No One Should Apologize For Telling Black Activists That ‘All Lives Matter’,” Think Progress 07-23-2015
http://act.colorofchange.org/go/5085?t=9&akid=4619.1174326.tI8Ytj

4. “In Tamir Rice Case, Many Errors by Cleveland Police, Then a Fatal One,” NYTimes 01-22-2015
http://act.colorofchange.org/go/5086?t=11&akid=4619.1174326.tI8Ytj

5. “No Charges in Ohio Police Killing of John Crawford as Wal-Mart Video Contradicts 911 Caller Account,” Democracy Now 09-24-2015
http://act.colorofchange.org/go/4477?t=13&akid=4619.1174326.tI8Ytj

6. “‘Black women unnamed': How Tanisha Anderson’s bad day turned into her last,” RawStory 06-06-2015
http://act.colorofchange.org/go/5087?t=15&akid=4619.1174326.tI8Ytj

7. “Officer in Tamir Rice Case Was Accused of Choking and Beating a Woman,” Mother Jones 06-03-2015
http://act.colorofchange.org/go/5088?t=17&akid=4619.1174326.tI8Ytj

8. “Mike Brown’s shooting and Jim Crow lynchings have too much in common. It’s time for America to own up,” The Guardian 08-25-2015
http://act.colorofchange.org/go/3985?t=19&akid=4619.1174326.tI8Ytj

9. “The Counted,” The Guardian June 2015
http://act.colorofchange.org/go/5011?t=21&akid=4619.1174326.tI8Ytj

The scientists are crying


Climate change is wreaking havoc on our planet — and scientists are literally crying in despair. The biggest climate summit of the decade is just four months away. If we can pack the streets at the largest climate march in history we can get our leaders to agree to end fossil fuels for good — join now!

I’m in

summer … sounds for driving


Campaign 2016 …


dscc

2016 Senate Map

Learn more about how we’ll take back the Senate in 2016.

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Pursuing transformative technology with the Google Impact Challenge: Disabilities ~ a repost


GOOGLeWhen Laura Palmaro was 10 years old, she woke one morning to find that the central vision in her left eye had all but disappeared. She was not ill and had no genetic issues—it was completely out of the blue. When she was 14, the same rare condition struck her right eye, and she began her freshman year of high school legally blind. Suddenly she was forced to depend on other people to read everything aloud, from school assignments to menus. The toughest part, according to Laura, was losing her sense of independence—and not knowing when or how she would get it back.

Laura has since adopted technological solutions to her vision challenges, using a combination of screen-readers and magnification software to read, work and more. Now a program manager at Google, she is following her passion, helping Chrome and Chrome OS teams make their products more accessible. “Technology has truly transformed my life,” she says. “Assistive technology can tear down boundaries, and empower people to find their independence and fulfill their dreams.”

We agree with Laura about the power of technology to change lives. And in order to support more people like her—people who see obstacles as opportunities—we’re launching the Google Impact Challenge: Disabilities. We’re putting $20 million in Google.org grants behind nonprofits using emerging technologies to increase independence for people living with disabilities, and today we’re issuing an open call to identify new areas of opportunity at g.co/ImpactChallengeDisability.

We’re kicking things off with support for two remarkable organizations. Each of these organizations is using technology to dramatically reduce the cost of and access to prosthetic limbs and auditory therapy, respectively—which could be transformative for hundreds of millions of people.

  • The Enable community connects people who want prosthetics with volunteers who use 3D printers to design, print, assemble, and fit them, for free. This dramatically cuts costs, increases speed of distribution, and meets unmet needs. We’ll support the Enable Community Foundation’s efforts with a $600,000 grant to advance the design, distribution and delivery of open-source 3D-printed upper-limb prosthetics.
  • Diagnosing auditory challenges can be a struggle in low income communities—the equipment is expensive, bulky and unrealistic, particularly in the developing world. With our support, and a $500,000 grant, World Wide Hearing will develop, prototype and test an extremely low cost tool kit for hearing loss using smartphone technology that’s widely available—and affordable—in the developing world.

The Google Impact Challenge: Disabilities will seek out nonprofits and help them find new solutions to some serious “what ifs” for the disabled community. We will choose the best of these ideas and help them to scale by investing in their vision, by rallying our people and by mobilizing our resources in support of their missions.

But of course, we realize there’s always room to improve our products as well. We have a team committed to monitoring the accessibility of Google tools; and we provide engineering teams with training to incorporate accessibility principles into products and services. That doesn’t just mean improving existing Google tools, it means developing new ones as well. For example, Liftware is a stabilizing utensil designed to help people with hand tremors eat more easily, and self-driving cars could one day transform mobility for everyone.

Historically, people living with disabilities have relied on technologies that were often bulky, expensive, and limited to assisting with one or two specific tasks. But that’s beginning to change. Thanks to groups like Enable and World Wide Hearing, and with tools like Liftware, we’re starting to see the potential for technologies that can profoundly and affordably impact millions. But we’ll all get there sooner if we make it a team effort—which is why we’re launching Google Impact Challenge: Disabilities today. Together, we can create a better world, faster.

Posted by Jacquelline Fuller, Director, Google.org