what a successful Presidency looks like


The following sponsored message was sent to you by AlterNet on behalf of DCCC:

This is what a successful Presidency looks like:

President Obama Took Office
(January 2009)
Today
7,949 The Dow Jones Index 17,573
7.8% Unemployment 5.8%
-5.4% GDP Growth 3.5%
9.8% Deficit GDP % 2.8%
37.7 Consumer Confidence 94.5

In 6 years under President Barack Obama, we’ve made incredible progress as a country.

Often in the face of incredible obstruction, the President has continued to fight for us and lead us forward.

Will you add your name now and say that you’re still standing with President Obama in his final two years in office?

Sign your name to say you’re standing with President Obama:
http:// action.dccc.org/i-stand-with-obama

WATCH: Jeb Bush Says Immigrants More Fertile, without Them America will Decline


Tell the Labor Department to support equal pay ~ a repost


BudgetEconomyTell the Labor Department to support equal pay

Did you know that some employers tell their workers that they cannot talk about their wages? Or that some workers could be punished for having a conversation with a co-worker about their paychecks?

For too many, that’s the truth. More than 6 in 10 private-sector workers say their employer either bars or discourages them from sharing information about their pay.

This unfair practice allows companies to keep wage discrepancies hidden. It also contributes to discrimination in the workplace. And that’s bad news for our work on equal pay.

But there’s good news, too: The Department of Labor is working on a plan to end these salary gag rules. Here’s your chance to tell it you support these efforts.

Tell the Department of Labor you support
this equal pay rule
Send a comment to the Department of Labor telling it that workersshould not be punished for talking about their pay.Take Action

If workers could talk about their wages openly and without fear, they could find out if they’re being paid less and determine if the discrepancy is due to discrimination based on their gender, race, or ethnicity.

And of course, women are hit hardest by wage discrepancies. Overall, women make just 78 cents for every dollar a man makes. African American women face a larger gap when their wages are compared to white men, making just 64 cents on the dollar. And Latinas make only 56 cents compared to white men.

Plus, the proposed rule wouldn’t just prohibit retaliation against workers who discuss their pay. It would also require contractors to give employees clear information about how they’re protected from retaliation for discussing pay.

Help us fight for equal pay for women today. Send a comment to the Department of Labor.

Thank you for taking action.

Sincerely,
Fatima Goss Graves
Vice President for Education and Employment
National Women’s Law Center

Carly No Es Mi Amiga


Brave New Films
Donate

Click here to watch the video

We don’t want Carly to bring racial profiling to California!

Through Carly Fiorina‘s fierce support of SB 1070 and racial profiling in Arizona one thing is clear, Carly is no friend of Latinos in California and Latinos everywhere.

Carly does NOT support comprehensive immigration reform and her real friends are Sheriff Arpaio and Arizona’s Governor Jan Brewer.

It is time to expose The REAL Carly! Today, we say: CARLY NO ES MI AMIGA (Carly is NOT my Friend).

Help spread the word about Carly Fiorina’s REAL views on Immigration and together we can stop the potential spread of racial profiling to California.

We want to make sure that California knows the REAL Carly. Can you contribute $15 so we can continue our education about the facts on Carly? Next we want to expose her track-record on jobs and her views on women’s issues. Please help us make this happen by donating here.

Thank you for your support.

Yours,
Robert Greenwald, Axel Caballero, Ofelia Yanez
and the Brave New Films team

History, Rebellion and Reconciliation : NMAAHC


NMAAHC -- National Museum of African American History and Culture

The Smithsonian’s National Museum
of African American History and Culture
presents a national conversation by hosting a daylong symposium,
 

HRR Logo.jpg

Saturday, April 25, 2015, 9:45am to 8:30pm EDT
National Museum of the American Indian
Rasmuson Theater
Independence and 4th St SW
Washington, D.C.

 Metro: Orange and Blue lines, L’Enfant Plaza or Federal Center SW
The symposium will be live streamed via Ustream


Admission is free and open to the public; however, seating is on a first-come, first-served basis and reservations are recommended. Reserve your free tickets by visiting Eventbrite. Please note if you wish to attend all panels, be sure to reserve a ticket for each panel.

A police shooting of an unarmed black man in Ferguson, Mo., this summer, along with other shootings by police officers around the county, led to weeks of protests in communities around the country. “We need to explore what this moment in our nation’s history means, especially in terms of leadership,” said Lonnie Bunch III, NMAAHC director. “What impact does generational change have on leadership and faith communities? What are the lessons to be learned from Ferguson, particularly within the context of community mobilization?”
Symposium Schedule

9:45am, director Lonnie Bunch opens the symposium and welcomes guests, followed by a discussion with Rev. Willis H. Johnson, pastor of Ferguson’s Wellspring Church. Willis will describe the conditions that led to the distrust between law enforcement and the city’s African American community.

10:30am-12:30pm, panel #1, “Ferguson: Impact, Importance & Long-Range Hopes.” This panel explores the evolution of the media, community leadership and activism as they relate to communities organized against excessive police force and economic inequality. Panel moderated by Juan Williams, journalist and Fox News political analyst. Panelists include: Lisa Crooms, Howard University law professor; Opal Tometi, founder of Black Lives Matter; Rev. F. Willis Johnson Jr., pastor Wellspring Church, Ferguson.

1:30pm to 2:30 pm, “On Art and History: A Conversation with Ava DuVernay.” Selma director, DuVernay, will discuss filmmaking and the creative responses to historic events such as the Selma to Montgomery march.

3:00pm – 5pm, panel #2, “Ferguson & Faith in the 21st Century.” This panel addresses the past, present and future roles of faith organizations as advocates for social change. It also examines changing roles of faith leaders. Moderated by Rex Ellis, NMAAHC associate director of curatorial affairs, the panel includes: Jeff Johnson, journalist and motivational speaker; Renee Harrison, Howard University School of Divinity professor and former Los Angeles police officer; Lerone A. Martin, assistant professor of Religion and Politics, John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics, Washington University, St. Louis; Rev. Osagyefo Uhuru Sekou, pastor, theologian, author, and community organizer; Stephanie Wolfe, dissertation fellow, John C. Danforth Center.

6:30pm – 8:30pm, panel #3, “#Words Matter: Making Revolution Irresistible.” This panel features the response of the creative community to excessive police violence, racism and communal demands for equality. Moderated by Jared Ball, associate professor of Communications, Morgan State University. The panel includes: Mark Bolden, psychologist and co-moderator; Jasiri X, Spoken Word artist; Jamilah Lemieux, senior digital editor, Ebony magazine; Jef Tate: DJ, Words, Beats and Life.
 

Other Presentations during the Symposium

12:30pm – 1:30pm, “Citizen” works by award-winning poet Claudia Rankine, interpreted on film by director John Lucas. The film shorts, titled Situation #1through 5, are based on Rankine’s book Citizen: An American Lyric.

5:00pm – 6 pm, view a slide presentation of social justice related objects from the museum’s collection and select artists, accompanied by a mix from DJ Jef Tate of “Words, Beats and Life.”

For questions about the symposium, email NMAAHCpubpgms@si.edu.

View the daylong symposium at Ustream. A dialogue on social media will be held throughout the symposium. The public may follow the museum on Twitter @NMAAHC to participate in the discussion using #HRRlive or #WordsMatter.

For more information, visit www.nmaahc.si.edu or call (202) 633-1000(202) 633-1000.