Tag Archives: Democratic

FDR had something to say about voting


Franklin D. Roosevelt once said

“Nobody will ever deprive the American people of the right to vote except the American people themselves and the only way they could do this is by not voting.”

I Have Decided To Stick With Love … MLK jr.


“I have decided to stick with love. Hate is too great a burden to bear.”   Thus spake Martin Luther King. Sort of.

MLK jr.

Excerpt from his August 16, 1967 “Where Do We Go From Here” speech.

He actually said this:

I have also decided to stick with love, for I know that love is ultimately the only answer  to mankind’s problems. And  I’m going  to  talk about it everywhere  I go. I know it isn’t popular to talk about it in some circles today. And I’m not talking about emotional bosh when  I talk about love; I’m talking about a strong, demanding  love.  For  I have seen  too much hate. I’ve seen too much hate on the faces of sheriffs in the South. I’ve seen hate on  the  faces of too many Klansmen and  too many White Citizens Councilors in  the South to want to hate, myself, because every time I see it, I know that it does something to their faces and their personalities, and I say to myself that hate is too great a burden to bear.  I have decided to love.

 

 

below is a commentary by: Her Bad Mother

If you are seeking the highest good, I think you can find it through love.

He’s right, of course. And he’s still right that talking about love isn’t popular in some circles, that for some, talk of love is just so much bosh and crap and none of us really believes that stuff, do we? Because talking about love is too easy, and real problems require real solutions, not sentimentalism, and isn’t everyone who prattles on about love at best a misguided optimist, of the cock-eyed variety, at worst an insincere manipulator, and shouldn’t we all just be getting angry?

No. No. Because nothing good was ever achieved through anger and hate. Because moving through the world wearing shit-colored glasses blinds us to the world-changing possibilities of hope and friendship and community and, yes, love. Because whether we’re talking about the assholes that wander the Internet looking for opportunities to spread ugliness and hostility or the pundits and politicos who put their enemies in crosshairs or the poor, miserable souls who think – or claim to think – that God tells them to hate – we’re talking about the same thing. We’re talking about the burden of hate. It drags us down. Whether it comes in small parcels or large, it weighs us down. It breaks our backs and it binds our arms and it (alongside, I would argue, apathy, which is just hate leached of its color and energy) is the thing that prevents us from seeing good and feeling good and realizing real change. It blinds us. It makes us ugly, and it makes it so that we can’t see how ugly we’ve become.

But. We can refuse it. We can decide to refuse the burden of hate; we can opt to not let it touch our shoulders. We can choose to stick with love, whatever that looks like. We can choose to stick with love. It’s not always easy – I get angry; I get lots angry and I get bitchy and I sometimes really struggle with the whole love thy neighbor thing because, seriously, the global neighborhood includes people like the Westboro Baptists – but still. We can choose to stick with love.

Let’s.

Please …

The Right to Vote and LBJ … a repost


By

Like CAP Action on Facebook and follow us on Twitter!

Defending And Expanding The Right To Vote

This week marks the 50th anniversary of President Lyndon B. Johnson signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964. President Obama, along with former presidents George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and Jimmy Carter, traveled to the LBJ Presidential Library Civil Rights Summit in Austin, Texas to pay tribute to the historic legislation and the man who spearheaded its passage.

In celebrating the milestone, however, both Obama and Clinton also took the opportunity to bring up another critical piece of LBJ’s civil rights legacy currently under attack for the first time in decades: the Voting Rights Act. Last year the Supreme Court gutted the law by deciding that discrimination is no longer rampant enough in Southern states to warrant extra scrutiny. And since then, several of these states, along with GOP-led swing states, have made a concerted effort to suppress the vote under the guise of combating the virtually non-existent problem of voter fraud. (A new rule in Miami-Dade county prohibits voters from using the bathroom, no matter how long the line is.)

Obama, in stirring remarks during which he credits LBJ’s accomplishments as a big part of “why I’m standing here today,” lauded President Johnson’s persistence to pursue voting rights after the Civil Rights Act was passed:

And he didn’t stop there, even though his advisers again told him to wait, again told him, let the dust settle; let the country absorb this momentous decision. He shook them off. The meat in the coconut, as President Johnson would put it, was the Voting Rights Act. So he fought for and passed that as well.

Clinton, meanwhile, took more direct approach. Speaking about the impacts of Texas’s new strict voter ID law, he said:

Here in Texas, the concealed carry permit counts [as a voter ID], but there’s one photo ID that doesn’t count: one from a Texas institution of higher education. This is a way of restricting the franchise after 50 years of expanding it. …Anytime you erect a barrier to political participation that disenfranchises people based on their income or race, it undermines the spirit of the Civil Rights Act.

These comments come as progressives organize to fight back against these repressive laws. States across the country are working to pass laws that don’t suppress the vote, but make it more accessible for every American:

votingexpand

And some of the Democratic party’s biggest names are putting a spotlight on the issue: Vice President Joe Biden recorded a video urging supporters to get involved. Bill and Hillary Clinton are “fired up.” And President Obama recently called efforts to prevent people from voting “un-American.”

BOTTOM LINE: After being arrested for leading a protest to pass the Voting Rights Act, Martin Luther King, Jr. wrote from a Selma, Alabama jail cell that voting is the “foundation stone for political action.” Today, that basic right is being threatened again. Defending the right to vote shouldn’t have to be a partisan issue; everybody should be able to agree to make voting more accessible for all.

Who Really Has A “Right to Rise” Under jeb?


| By  a repost

Another Bush Is Running For President

Jeb Bush announced he is running for president today, surprising everyone who thought he already made that announcement six months ago. Nearly ten years after the end of his two terms as governor of Florida and after a major staff shakeup, Jeb has officially launched his campaign as an “inclusive” Republican. But despite his promises to “make opportunity common again,” Bush’s record as governor and his policy positions since suggest he is more likely to protect the opportunity of those who already have it. Bush’s tenure was marked by a decrease in access to higher education, access to the American dream, and access to justice —all critical to increased opportunity.

Ahead of Bush’s announcement, CAP action examined the impact of Bush’s policy positions and actions as governor and analyzed how they would impact the entire country. We found that the rhetoric we saw in his announcement speech today doesn’t match up with the reality of his leadership:

Affirmative Action:
Rhetoric: “We stopped processing kids along as if we didn’t care – because we do care, and you don’t show that by counting out anyone’s child. You give them all a chance.”

Reality: As governor of Florida, Jeb Bush repealed affirmative action for public higher education institutions, and as a result African American enrollment at Florida universities decreased by 10.9 percent. Over the same time period, African American enrollment in public universities nationwide actually increased by 3.5 percent. If, instead of increasing, national black enrollment decreased at the same rate Florida’s did, it would mean 13.9 percent fewer black students in these universities in 2013 – a total of 85,726 fewer black students enrolled. That’s equivalent to all the African American students in all California public universities – five times over.

Immigration:
Rhetoric: “The next president of the United States will pass meaningful immigration reform.”
Reality: Bush has been so vocal an opponent of President Obama’s executive action on immigration that he compared the president to a “Latin American dictator.” A report from the Center for American Progress shows that President Obama’s actions to reform our immigration system would grow our economy by $230 billion over ten years. Bush’s home state of Florida would see nearly $10 billion in GDP growth and allow 230,000 immigrants to come out of the shadows, work and pay taxes.

Stand Your Ground:
Rhetoric: “…Every life matters and everyone has the right to rise.”
Reality: We can thank Jeb Bush for signing the first “Stand Your Ground” law in the nation. In 2012, a study by the Tampa Bay Times of Stand Your Ground cases in Florida found that people who invoke the law to justify a killing are more likely to be successful if the victim was black: 73% of perpetrators who killed a black victim faced no penalty versus 59% of perpetrators who killed a white victim. Since Bush passed the Stand Your Ground Law a defendant in Florida is 24 percent more likely to win a case if the victim were black than if the victim were white. Florida’s law paved the way for other states to adopt similar laws, which have contributed to an additional 600 homicides per year.

Women:
Rhetoric: Bush talks often about giving everyone the ability to rise up, lamenting that, “we’re moving to a world that is sticky in the ends, where it’s harder for people in poverty to move up and where the rich are doing really well and the middle is getting squeezed.”
Reality: Bush may say that everyone has the right to rise, but while governor he opposed a federal effort to expand paid sick leave, a policy that heavily impacts working women. Instead of opening the door to opportunity, Bush said these types of policies “are best left to businesses.” But passing paid leave would benefit the more than 40 million American workers that can’t take a single day off work to recover from an illness or take care of a family member without risking losing their jobs.

BOTTOM LINE: On these issues and many more, Jeb Bush is a divider, not a uniter. His announcement speech today was full of rhetoric promising to expand opportunity for hard working Americans, but Bush’s record paints a much different picture.