Cinnamon Toast Crunch


English: A Bowl Of Cinnamon Toast Crunch

English: A Bowl Of Cinnamon Toast Crunch (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Homemade Cinnamon Toast Crunch
Makes 5 to 6 cups

1¼ c. white whole wheat flour or whole wheat pastry flour
1¼ c. all-purpose flour

2 tsp. baking soda
2 tsp. cinnamon

⅓ c. coconut oil, at room temperature (or room temperature butter)
⅓ c. brown sugar

2 tbsp. granulated sugar
1 tbsp. vanilla extract

2 tbsp. honey
½ c. buttermilk maybe coconut milk

For the cinnamon sugar topping
1 tbsp. coconut oil, melted (or melted butter)

2 tbsp. granulated sugar
¾ tsp. cinnamon

Dark and Milk Chocolate


Chocolate

05/21/2015 1:15 PM EDT
FDA is releasing more information about its study finding that some dark chocolate products contain varying amounts of milk. And you can’t always tell that’s the case simply by reading the food label.

Read the Consumer Update to learn more.

Pursuing transformative technology with the Google Impact Challenge: Disabilities


GOOGLeWhen Laura Palmaro was 10 years old, she woke one morning to find that the central vision in her left eye had all but disappeared. She was not ill and had no genetic issues—it was completely out of the blue. When she was 14, the same rare condition struck her right eye, and she began her freshman year of high school legally blind. Suddenly she was forced to depend on other people to read everything aloud, from school assignments to menus. The toughest part, according to Laura, was losing her sense of independence—and not knowing when or how she would get it back.

Laura has since adopted technological solutions to her vision challenges, using a combination of screen-readers and magnification software to read, work and more. Now a program manager at Google, she is following her passion, helping Chrome and Chrome OS teams make their products more accessible. “Technology has truly transformed my life,” she says. “Assistive technology can tear down boundaries, and empower people to find their independence and fulfill their dreams.”

We agree with Laura about the power of technology to change lives. And in order to support more people like her—people who see obstacles as opportunities—we’re launching the Google Impact Challenge: Disabilities. We’re putting $20 million in Google.org grants behind nonprofits using emerging technologies to increase independence for people living with disabilities, and today we’re issuing an open call to identify new areas of opportunity at g.co/ImpactChallengeDisability.

We’re kicking things off with support for two remarkable organizations. Each of these organizations is using technology to dramatically reduce the cost of and access to prosthetic limbs and auditory therapy, respectively—which could be transformative for hundreds of millions of people.

  • The Enable community connects people who want prosthetics with volunteers who use 3D printers to design, print, assemble, and fit them, for free. This dramatically cuts costs, increases speed of distribution, and meets unmet needs. We’ll support the Enable Community Foundation’s efforts with a $600,000 grant to advance the design, distribution and delivery of open-source 3D-printed upper-limb prosthetics.
  • Diagnosing auditory challenges can be a struggle in low income communities—the equipment is expensive, bulky and unrealistic, particularly in the developing world. With our support, and a $500,000 grant, World Wide Hearing will develop, prototype and test an extremely low cost tool kit for hearing loss using smartphone technology that’s widely available—and affordable—in the developing world.

The Google Impact Challenge: Disabilities will seek out nonprofits and help them find new solutions to some serious “what ifs” for the disabled community. We will choose the best of these ideas and help them to scale by investing in their vision, by rallying our people and by mobilizing our resources in support of their missions.

But of course, we realize there’s always room to improve our products as well. We have a team committed to monitoring the accessibility of Google tools; and we provide engineering teams with training to incorporate accessibility principles into products and services. That doesn’t just mean improving existing Google tools, it means developing new ones as well. For example, Liftware is a stabilizing utensil designed to help people with hand tremors eat more easily, and self-driving cars could one day transform mobility for everyone.

Historically, people living with disabilities have relied on technologies that were often bulky, expensive, and limited to assisting with one or two specific tasks. But that’s beginning to change. Thanks to groups like Enable and World Wide Hearing, and with tools like Liftware, we’re starting to see the potential for technologies that can profoundly and affordably impact millions. But we’ll all get there sooner if we make it a team effort—which is why we’re launching Google Impact Challenge: Disabilities today. Together, we can create a better world, faster.

Posted by Jacquelline Fuller, Director, Google.org

The One Thing You Need to Know When Buying Vanilla Ice Cream


We devoured pint after pint to get the scoop on vanilla ice cream — and uncovered the best-tasting brand along the way.

The One Thing You Need to Know When Buying Vanilla Ice Cream

Go to the freezer section of your local supermarket and you’re bound to find a number of brands peddling vanilla ice cream. Sounds fine, right? However, there’s a problem lurking among the labels: Brands that print phrases like “natural vanilla” on their packages may actually be pushing products that contain anything but.

RELATED: Want to make your own ice cream? Arm yourself with the best recipes and detailed video tutorials (try it for free).

In our America’s Test Kitchen TV taste test segment for supermarket vanilla ice cream, Jack Bishop explains that counterfeit vanilla is a bigger problem than one might think, and implores smart shoppers to read labels before buying a pint of the stuff.

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“Vanilla extract is the key to buying ice cream with good vanilla flavor,” says Bishop. “If it doesn’t say vanilla extract, walk on by.”

Bishop explains to co-host Christopher Kimball that shoppers might see the words “natural vanilla flavor” printed on ice cream cartons. “Sounds pretty good, right? It’s actually imitation extract made from wood pulp.”

RELATED: Not sure if a Vitamix is worth it? Read our review of blenders. Shopping for a new skillet? We have you covered.

Vanilla flavoring was all over the map in the 8 ice creams we included in our taste test, ranging from barely detectable in some to overpowering in others. We looked on the back of the cartons and noticed that each brand seemed to list vanilla in a different way—as Bishop explained—from the wordy and virtuous “fair-traded certified vanilla extract” to “natural vanilla flavor” to simply “vanilla.” Dairy expert Scott Rankin, a professor of food science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, explained that the different wordings on the labels amount to an industry shorthand for specific kinds of natural or artificial flavorings. As he helped us break the code, we looked at our favorite (and not-so-favorite) ice creams according to the type of vanilla.

First, a little background: The flavor in vanilla beans is predominantly due to the presence of a compound known as vanillin. Vanillin is produced three ways: from vanilla beans, from wood, and from resins. The first two types are considered natural, while the vanillin from resins is synthetic. Not surprisingly, our top three top-ranked brands all contained the real deal—“vanilla extract”—natural vanillin extracted from vanilla beans, just like the real vanilla extract in your pantry. Less favored brands were made with vanillin extracted from wood (“natural vanilla flavor”), which is chemically identical to the synthetic vanillin found in artificial vanilla extract. Simple “vanilla” turned out to be code for a combination of synthetic and natural vanillin, while “natural flavors” (with no mention of vanilla at all) indicates just a trace of natural vanilla (there’s no required level) and other flavorings such as nutmeg that merely trigger an association.

Bottom line: Our tasters strongly preferred brands containing real vanilla extract.

FDA/USDA ~~ Alerts & Safety May


USFDA_footer

05/27/2015 05:12 PM EDT Vitamin Cottage Natural Food Markets Inc., a Lakewood, Colo., based natural grocery chain, is recalling two lots of Natural Grocers brand Macadamia nuts as the product has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems.
05/26/2015 05:56 PM EDT  Jose Madrid Salsa of Zanesville, Ohio has issued a voluntary recall of Jose Madrid Salsa Original Mild Salsa packaged in 13oz jars, due to potentially improperly sealed jars. An unknown number of jar lids may have been convex instead of vacuum sealed.
05/26/2015 05:57 PM EDT House of Spices of Flushing, NY is recalling its 200 gm packages of “Laxmi Dry Apricot” food treats because they contained undeclared sulfites. Consumers who have severe sensitivity to sulfites run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reactions if they consume this product.
05/26/2015 05:56 PM EDT
Jose Madrid Salsa of Zanesville, Ohio has issued a voluntary recall of Jose Madrid Salsa Original Mild Salsa packaged in 13oz jars, due to potentially improperly sealed jars. An unknown number of jar lids may have been convex instead of vacuum sealed.
05/23/2015 08:20 PM EDT Falcon Trading Company, Inc./SunRidge Farms of Royal Oaks, CA announced that it has taken the precautionary measure of voluntarily recalling the one bulk item mentioned below. This item was distributed to the East Coast on May 7, 2015.
05/23/2015 09:11 AM EDT  Falcon Trading Company, Inc./SunRidge Farms of Royal Oaks, CA announced that it has taken the precautionary measure of voluntarily recalling the one bulk item mentioned below. The product may contain very small stainless steel wire, the kind and type used in the screening process during manufacturing.

 

Recall Summary Name of product: Nest Booster SeatOXO Nest Booster Seat

Hazard: if you bought one from September 2014 – present

Consumer Contact:

OXO at (800) 545-4411 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, email at info@oxo.com or online at www.oxo.com and click on Customer Service under the Contact Us tab at the bottom of the page for more information.

The stitching on the restraint straps can loosen which allows the straps to separate from the seat, posing a fall hazard to children

http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2015/OXO-Recalls-Nest-Booster-Seats/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=Recalls+RSS#remedy

 

LQNN, Inc. Recalls Poultry, Beef and Pork Products Produced Without the Benefit of Inspection and Misbranded With Unauthorized Use of the USDA Mark of Inspection

LQNN, Inc., a Garden Grove, Calif. firm is recalling approximately 213,192 pounds of chicken, beef and pork products that were produced without the benefit of inspection and misbranded because of the unauthorized use of a USDA mark of inspection. The products which were moved and sold in commerce, included the unapproved use of another facility’s mark of inspection, which has been identified as Establishment number 18995. LQNN, Inc., operating as Lee’s Sandwiches, has been processing products from federally-inspected establishments and re-packaging them without the benefit of inspection. Products produced without inspection present potential of increased human health risk.

05/19/2015 06:50 PM EDT  A&S FOOD TRADING INC at 4425B 1ST AVE, BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 11232 is recalling HUA ZHI YING BRAND GOURD CANDY because it contains undeclared sulfites. People who have severe sensitivity to sulfites run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reactions if they consume this product.

NHTSA Statement on Takata Air Bag Inflators

“The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration received notification from BMW, Chrysler, Ford, Honda, Mazda, Nissan and Toyota that they are conducting limited regional recalls to address a possible safety defect involving Takata brand air bag inflators.

“Today’s action is influenced by a NHTSA investigation into six reports of air bag inflator ruptures, all of which occurred in Florida and Puerto Rico.

“Based on the limited data available at this time, NHTSA supports efforts by automakers to address the immediate risk in areasthat have consistently hot, humid conditions over extended periods of time.

Consumers impacted by the recalls should have their vehicles serviced promptly once they receive notification from their vehicle manufacturer. NHTSA remains in close communication with the supplier and automakers to gather additional data and will take appropriate action based on our findings.”

05/18/2015 11:15 AM EDT ZYK Enterprises, Inc. a Duvall, WA establishment, is recalling 2,522 pounds of boneless veal trim and whole veal muscle cut products that may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7.
05/15/2015 08:48 PM EDT OC Raw Dog of Rancho Santa Margarita, CA is voluntarily recalling 2055 lbs. of Turkey & Produce Raw Frozen Canine Formulation, because it has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella. An organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems.
05/15/2015 10:09 PM EDT Aurora Products, Inc. is conducting a voluntary recall of RAW MACADAMIA NUTS packaged under the Aurora brand label and various Store brand labels. Products are being recalled because they have the potential to contain Salmonella which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain.

Blue Bell Ice Cream Recalls 3 oz. Institutional/Food Service leads to layoffs of 1450 of listeria

Safety 2015-04-21 | http://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls/ucm439533.htm

Firm’s Press Release Third Recall Expansion. FDA Investigates Listeria monocytogenes in Ice Cream Products from Blue Bell Creameries.

FDA Investigates Listeria monocytogenes in Ice Cream Food

2015-05-14 | http://www.fda.gov/food/recallsoutbreaksemergencies/outbreaks/ucm438104.htm

contact with the potentially contaminated ice cream, it is Blue Bell urges consumers who have purchased these items pm CST or go to bluebell.com

05/14/2015 07:15 PM EDT AA Poultry Processing, LLC, a Ridgeland, Wis. establishment, is recalling approximately 2,191 pounds of chicken and 21 pounds of turkey products, which may have been contaminated with trichloro-s-triazinetrione, which is not approved for use in poultry processing.
05/11/2015 12:44 PM EDT  Good Seed Inc. of Springfield, VA is recalling all packages of soybean sprouts and mung bean sprouts because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections to individuals with weakened immune systems.
05/02/2015 02:14 AM EDT Sun Rich Fresh Foods Inc. of Richmond, BC, Canada is voluntarily recalling sliced apple and products containing sliced apples, from its Northeast Fresh Facility located in Brampton, ON, Canada because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems.
05/02/2015 01:17 AM EDT
Bi-Lo Supermarket #5406, a Rossville, Ga. establishment, is recalling approximately 11-22 pounds of ground beef products that may be contaminated with pieces from a small plastic pop-up timer.
05/02/2015 01:17 AM EDT
Victory Kitchens, a Toronto, Ontario, Canada firm, is recalling approximately 4,672 pounds of chicken noodle soup products that contain chicken from a country that is not eligible to send product to the U.S.