President Obama Supports Equal Pay for Equal Work … does your member of Congress? a repost


Hi,

On average, full-time working women earn 77 cents for every dollar earned by men.

Worse still? Many women don’t even know they’re underpaid. And because 51% of women report they are discouraged or forbidden from discussing their wages, they can’t take steps that would ensure they’re earning fair pay at work.

That’s why today, on Equal Pay Day, President Obama is taking action.

See what President Obama is doing to address the gap — then share the news.

Women deserve fair pay at work. Check out this graphic, and pass it on.

Thanks,

Cecilia

Cecilia Muñoz
Director, Domestic Policy Council
The White House
@Cecilia44

Visit WhiteHouse.gov

Road Block – Chris Christie


 repost

A one-man roadblock to progress. It’s what I see when I look at Chris Christie.

Just look at the guy’s record as governor:

  • Vetoed equal pay
  • Vetoed marriage equality
  • Slashed family planning funding
  • Vetoed a minimum wage increase
  • 400,000 people unemployed in New Jersey

And he’s the first anti-choice governor of New Jersey since Roe v. Wade.

It’s right there in front of us — Chris Christie is the wrong governor for New Jersey.

Christie’s set on being a brick wall against New Jersey’s progressive values. So let’s beat this guy and elect a pro-choice Democratic woman in his place.

Contribute to Barbara Buono right now and stop Christie in his tracks before he gets the chance to take his roadblock any further.

The guy only gets worse when you look at the company he keeps.
Scott Walker — Wisconsin’s dreadfully anti-worker governor — hosted a fundraiser for Christie, and Christie has called Walker “courageous” for his attacks on working families.

Mitt Romney called Christie the future of the Republican Party.

And fellow extremist-in-disguise Scott Brown fundraised for Christie just a couple months ago.

I’ll tell you what, I wouldn’t mind a repeat performance of a true progressive sending a faux moderate packing — just like Elizabeth Warren did to Scott Brown.
Barbara Buono’s spent her career doing everything possible to improve the lives of New Jersey’s women and families. She’s everything Christie isn’t: staunchly pro-choice, a true friend to workers, and dedicated to real service for the people of her state.

Contribute to Barbara right now. Chris Christie is dangerous to New Jersey women and families — we’ve got to do everything possible to stop him.

The people of New Jersey deserve better. They deserve a true reformer like Barbara who actually cares about the people she represents, not her own self-interests.

Make it happen.

Jonathan Parker
Director of Campaigns, EMILY’s List

The 2009 Racial Justice Act


The North Carolina Racial Justice Act of 2009

…     prohibited seeking or imposing the death penalty on the basis of race. The act identified types of evidence that might be considered by the court when considering whether race was a basis for seeking or imposing the death penalty, and established a process by which relevant evidence might be used to establish that race was a significant factor in seeking or imposing the death penalty. The defendant had the burden of proving that race was a significant factor in seeking or imposing the death penalty, and the state was allowed to offer evidence to rebut the claims or evidence of the defendant. If race was found to be a significant factor in the imposition of the death penalty, the death sentence would automatically be commuted to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole.[1]

North Carolina General Assembly Repeal attempts[edit]

Under pressure from a group of 43 district attorneys, who expressed opposition to the act citing the clog of the court system in the state, the North Carolina Senate passed a bill by a 27-14 vote on November 28, 2011, that would have effectively repealed the Racial Justice Act.[2] However, on December 14, Governor Bev Perdue, a Democrat, vetoed the bill, saying that while she supports the death penalty, she felt it was “simply unacceptable for racial prejudice to play a role in the imposition of the death penalty in North Carolina.”[3] The state legislature did not have enough votes to override Perdue’s veto.

Major revision (2012)[edit]

The North Carolina General Assembly passed a major revision of the law in 2012 authored by Rep. Paul Stam (R-Wake). The rewrite “severely restricts the use of statistics to only the county or judicial district where the crime occurred, instead of the entire state or region. It also says statistics alone are insufficient to prove bias, and that the race of the victim cannot be taken into account.” The bill was vetoed by Gov. Perdue, but this time, the legislature overrode the governor’s veto.[4]

Repeal[edit]

The North Carolina General Assembly voted to effectively repeal the entire law in 2013 and Gov. Pat McCrory, a Republican, signed the repeal into law.[5]

Appeals under act[edit]

On April 20, 2012, in the first case appealed under the Racial Justice Act, the then-Senior Resident Superior Court Judge in Cumberland County (Fayetteville), Judge Greg Weeks, threw out the death sentence of Marcus Raymond Robinson, automatically commuting his sentence to life without parole. Robinson contended that when he was sentenced to death in 1994, prosecutors deliberately kept blacks off the jury. Robinson’s lawyers cited a study from Michigan State University College of Law indicating that prosecutors across North Carolina improperly used their peremptory challenges to systemically exclude qualified black jurors from jury service.[6][7][8]

References[edit]

  1. Jump up ^ Senate Bill 461, General Assembly of North Carolina, Session 2009
  2. Jump up ^ Bufkin, Sarah. “North Carolina General Assembly Votes To Repeal Landmark Racial Justice Law”. Think Progress: Justice. Retrieved 8 December 2011. 
  3. Jump up ^ Jarvis, Greg (2012-12-15). “Perdue veto saves death-row appeal law”. The News & Observer. 
  4. Jump up ^ News & Observer
  5. Jump up ^ Charlotte Observer
  6. Jump up ^ “Judge: Racism played role in Cumberland County trial, death sentence converted in N.C.’s first Racial Justice Act case”. The Fayetteville Observer. April 20, 2012. Retrieved April 21, 2012. 
  7. Jump up ^ “Racial bias saves death row man”. BBC News (BBC). April 20, 2012. Retrieved April 21, 2012. 
  8. Jump up ^ Zucchino, David (April 20, 2012). “Death penalty vacated under North Carolina’s racial justice law”. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved April 21, 2012.

Resource …wiki