Help turn EveryTown orange… June 2 for Hadiya


Our daughter, Hadiya, was the light of our life — and she shined even brighter after performing with her marching band at President Obama’s inauguration in 2013.Everytown for Gun Safety 

We never imagined that one week later, she would be murdered with a gun — shot at a park near her school in Chicago.

Hadiya’s high school classmates will be graduating next month. While Hadiya won’t get to walk across that stage, her friends are all going to wear orange on June 2 in her honor — and to inspire action to stop the gun violence that takes too many lives in this country. We’re writing to ask for your help.

Pledge to wear orange on June 2 and show that you’re one of the millions of Americans who believes we must do more to end gun violence in our country. People from all over the country will come together online and in person to declare June 2 National Gun Violence Awareness Day

Wear Orange on June 2: Take the Pledge

Hadiya’s friends chose the color orange because it symbolizes the value of human life. Hunters wear orange to alert other hunters that they’re there. It is a way to take care of their own life and the lives of others.

For us, it also represents the enormous potential that is lost when a young person like Hadiya is killed. By wearing orange, we reaffirm the right of every American to live a life free from gun violence.

This day is especially close to our hearts because June 2 would have also been Hadiya’s 18th birthday. We’ll be wearing orange to honor Hadiya and all the love and joy she brought to our community here in Chicago.

Please join us in wearing orange for your loved ones, your city, and our country.

Click below to automatically fill out your pledge, and you’ll receive a reminder to wear orange on June 2 for National Gun Violence Awareness Day:

http://act.everytown.org/sign/wear-orangeGun violence touches every corner of America. We don’t have to live in a country where shootings happen every day. If we all stand up together and demand change, we will succeed.

Thank you for being part of this movement with us.

Sincerely,

Nate and Cleo Pendleton

Cleo and Nate Pendleton

As a movement of Americans fighting for common-sense gun policies, we depend on contributions from supporters like you to fund important work to reduce gun violence.

Feb. 2015 So You Think You Can Dance USA vs. China


Top US super dancers:Russell Ferguson,Tight Eyez Krumping,Fik-Shun,Phillip Chbeeb,Billy Bell,Paul Karmiryan,Sasha Mallory,Jawn Ha,Jasmine Harper,Clarice Ordaz,Princess Lockerooo, Craig Smith and Micheline Marmol
2015 Dancing Oscar So You Think You Can Dance USA VS China (2):Each year, best USA

You can see Jasmine and her Partner in Video2 starting at 46:40 … amazing

Ellen and Michelle Obama Have a Dance Off


https://celebrity.yahoo.com/video/ellen-michelle-obama-dance-off-164416508.html

Southern Rites: The Heartbreaking Story of Justin Patterson’s Death


Wh<i>Best viewed in full screen mode</i><br>Julie and Bubba, 2002en Gillian Laub started photographing the racially divided town of Mount Vernon, Ga. — with its segregated homecomings and proms — she stumbled onto the story of Justin Patterson, a 22-year-old black man who was killed, on Jan. 29, 2011, by Norman Neesmith, a 62-year-old white man.

posted in Time

Patterson’s story, which further divided Mount Vernon, is the subject of Southern Rites, a HBO documentary premiering on May 18.

Dedee Clarke, Justin’s mother, spoke to TIME.

In HBO’s Southern Rites, photographer Gillian Laub goes to Mount Vernon, Ga., a racially divided town

Gillian Laub:Sha’von, Justin and Santa, 2012

“When I got the call, it was around 3.45 in the morning and my youngest son, Sha’von, said that Justin had been shot and he was dead… For a long time, Sha’von wouldn’t talk about it, he would only tell me things in bits and pieces. It wasn’t until 2013 that he told me the whole story. I think that the thing that bothered him the most was that the gun was actually aimed at him. Justin looked back, saw that and pushed Sha’von out of the way and took the shot himself. It’s something I don’t think he’ll really recover from. He just has to learn to live with it. It’s a day-by-day process, but I don’t think anybody can ever be the same.

The first time I met Gillian was in 2010. My youngest son, Sha’von, was attending the prom that year, and she was photographing it. I thought the work she was doing was great. But I didn’t know that much about her, I just knew that the pictures that she was taking were important. I didn’t get to know her on a deeper level until my son, Justin, died.

[When Gillian shifted her focus to what had happened to Justin], I was, at first, a little reluctant. But I could just see her passion and drive as she talked to me and I knew at that point that she really cared. I was more relaxed around her and I began to open up. But I just remember saying that it wasn’t going to be pretty sight because I was just not in the right state of mind, and she understood that.

You have to feel some kind of compassion when you do this. And Gillian had that; she felt it. And because she felt it, I believed that shows in her work.

Of course, it was very difficult to see Norman Neesmith in Gillian’s film. I had always made it a point not to really look directly at him. And to see him up close and personal in the film, it was very hard. It was hard to watch some of the things that he said. It’s just hard to hear that he never really acknowledged that his daughter invited them into his home. I felt that he thought he was a victim. I don’t think he understands that Justin had a life. He had a daughter. And she will never have her father.

Gillian’s work makes me feel that my son’s death was not in vain. That’s the one thing that I can hope for. I’m hoping that it will help someone. It’s too late for my son, but maybe it can help somebody else.

I’m hoping it will help other mothers to see that you can still survive that kind of pain and. I’m a survivor because God says I am. Everything that I believe in is because of God. He’s the reason that I’m here because there’s no way I could have done any of this by myself. I felt like nobody really cared because the story wasn’t out. It was a while before it was even in a paper. To see it now and to know that people really care, it does make me feel supported. It definitely does. I’m thinking that everyone will have an idea of what happened. This is real life. These people are real people; they feel that pain continuously every day.

My goal here is for people to know and understand that there’s still, very much so, a lot of injustice in this world and something has to be done about it.”

SWAY IS BACK!


dreamertobeliever:</p><br />
<p>2/27 Maks reposting the Sway video already posted