Meet Republican Carly Fiorina


Meet Republican Carly Fiorina of California: She’s anti-choice, anti-gay and she’s mocked climate change concerns as just being “worried about the weather.” And like so many other Republican candidates this year, she’s a multimillionaire corporate executive trying to buy her way into public office.

Now meet California’s Democratic Senator Barbara Boxer: She’s a progressive leader who’s spent her career fighting for everyday Americans against corporations, Wall Street lobbyists… and multimillionaire corporate executives like Carly Fiorina.

Senator Boxer stands up and leads in a U.S. Senate that needs progressive women.

Carly will stand up for corporations instead of people and she’ll do anything to win. That’s exactly why Carly Fiorina is writing million dollar checks to her own campaign. She wrote herself $2.5 million in January and then $1.1 million more in May. That’s a lot of money — and it makes Carly a formidable candidate who’s able to go negative and scare California voters.

But it’s also the backing of just one person… the world’s smallest fan club. So today, we’re going to help Barbara Boxer send California a message: 100,000 Americans stand strong with Barbara Boxer, while her opponent stands alone.

Contribute $3 to Barbara Boxer today and help her reach 100,000 donors

Senator Boxer is a strong woman with a record of leading progressive victories in the U.S. Senate and she can win again on Election Day. But she’s facing her toughest opponent yet in a year that the pundits claim will be a tough election for Democrats. So here’s the thing, if some Democrats lose this November, it’s never been more important for us to make sure progressive leaders like Barbara Boxer win.

We’re proving people matter more than money, so it doesn’t matter how much you contribute today. What matters is the message of support showing that everyday Americans contributing small amounts can beat back the power of multimillion dollar corporations and their lackeys who run for Congress.

Carly Fiorina’s support amounts to herself and her checkbook. Barbara Boxer has the support of over 100,000 Americans.

Let’s prove it — Contribute $3 to Barbara Boxer right now

Thank you for everything you do to make sure progressives win in 2010.

-Charles

Charles Chamberlain, Political Director
Democracy for America

Democracy for America relies on you and the people-power of more than one million members to fund the grassroots organizing and training that delivers progressive change on the issues that matter. Please Contribute Today and support our mission.

9 Insane Facts About Your Food That Will Give You The Ultimate Shock!


Originally posted on The Zeit:

Mother feeding child Shocking Food Facts
Photo by marin

1- The most expensive coffee in the world is brewed from beans partially digested and defecated by toddy cats. How do you take your “poo”? With sugar and cream please.

2- The common bread ingredient L-cysteine is derived from human hair. Don’t believe it’s only hair from your head if you know what I mean; eeuww!

3- Chicken McNuggets contain industrial chemicals. TBHQ, a petroleum derivative, is used as a stabilizer in oil field chemicals amongst other things. TBHQ has been linked to stomach tumors. Another chemical used as an ingredient is Dimethylpolysiloxane which is a type of silicone. It is used as a filler for breast implants, and is the key ingredient in Silly Putty.

View original 351 more words

How many Bolivians are dying because foodies love quinoa?


By Virginia Heffernan

A long time ago, “Bolivian marching powder” meant cocaine.

Now it could mean quinoa. Quinoa is a massive crop that for millennia has honed its extraterrestrial nutritional powers in the dizzying altitudes of the Andes. In recent years, this curious substance—like coke before it—has also become a major export for Peru and Bolivia.

But, as the Guardian recently reported, the foreign market for the good seed has driven the street price of quinoa up so high that most Bolivians and Peruvians can no longer afford their homegrown staple. For the people who used to live on it, protein-dense quinoa is now more expensive than chicken. That’s rich.

Denied their indigenous marching grain (technically a “pseudocereal”), Bolivian and Peruvian peasants are turning to junk food—the same sugary bunk that sickens and malnourishes millions of us in the U.S. And thus we net a nifty parable of globalism, progress and nutrition, with one clear upshot: Foodism, like every other ideology, is dangerous—and carries unintended consequences.

I would tell you what quinoa is, in hair-splitting pseudo-agricultural detail, but then I’d sound like just one of them. The foodies. Those people who are always saying—oh, I can’t even mock them. Suffice it to say I’d rather hear an Oxycontin addict talk about how he puts the edge back on with Adderall than I would a foodie talk about how he balances the acids in mustard greens with cake flour. At least the Oxy folks don’t turn their boring and expensive pleasure into sanctimony. In my experience, they’re even somewhat private and sheepish about it.

But let’s just say quinoa is a thing that foodies adore, that exists by the gunnysackful in the stockrooms of liberal-elite restaurants and liberal-elite kitchens in Boston, San Francisco, Manhattan, Portland, Chicago, Austin and Seattle.

Quinoa is stylish and, furthermore, believed by the Timothy Learys of the foodists to goose or balance “amino-acid levels,” without which many noble vegans and carniphobes would perish (or have to resort to yucky supplements). To be a good sport, since I live in foodie Brooklyn myself, I have tried quinoa with beets and cheese and fish, in muffins, beside eggs—wherever regular American carbs like potatoes used to be served.

The people of the Andes like to eat quinoa this way too, it turns out. Quinoa is known to Andean folks as the “lost crop of the Incas,” as well as a “miracle grain” for its near-holy amino-acid balance. But then, suddenly, rich people in other countries, including the United States, some of whom have shifted their taste from white powder to this other intoxicant measured in grams, wanted to sample the latest Bolivian miracle. So we enriched many farmers by buying up the quinoa—and further impoverished the Andeans, by dooming them to malnutrition.

What a story! Quinoa prices, according to the Bolivian department of agriculture, have almost tripled in five years, during which time Bolivia’s own quinoa consumption has dropped by a third. In areas where quinoa is grown, chronic malnutrition in children marches upward.

Of course, there’s a style issue in Bolivia, too. Kids in Park Slope, Brooklyn or Marin County, Calif., raised in the cult of Alice Waters and Whole Foods, may like quinoa, but regular kids in countries that aren’t hyper-trophically developed don’t typically ask for it. Sensibly, they ask for what’s sugary and on circus-colored billboards. Explains Víctor Hugo Vásquez, vice minister of rural development and agriculture in Bolivia, “If you give them boiled water, sugar and quinoa flour mixed into a drink, they prefer Coca-Cola.”

At the same time, ballooning quinoa prices also raise questions that could, if answered, change the story from ironic and sad to more complex still.

As Marc F. Bellemare, an assistant professor at Duke University, points out in his blog, the tragic take on the quinoa boom assumes that Bolivian households are mostly quinoa consumers penalized by a bull market and not quinoa farmers and sellers who stand to gain from it. In fact, agricultural economists haven’t sorted this out yet. Journalists who make the opposite, and equally unfounded, assumption—that Bolivians are mostly quinoa farmers (and not children starving for want of quinoa)—sound like delirious free-market boosters. In The Globe and Mail, Doug Saunders has raved that for Bolivians the quinoa craze is “the greatest thing that has happened to them. … Quinoa had all but died out as a staple in Bolivia, replaced by beans and potatoes, until farmers began planting it in the 1980s with exports to North America in mind.”

The important thing, then, is to follow the food without getting ideological, not only about wholesome classy quinoa, but also about delicious tawdry Coca-Cola, that bugbear of foodies who are perpetually disgusted to discover that the feeble-minded among us still like a little sugar with our water. Eat what you want, but stop preaching about it, and it surely can’t hurt to leave some Andean quinoa for the people of the Andes.

To help children in Bolivia, where more than half the kids 6 months to 5 years old suffer from malnutrition, and 54 in a thousand die in childhood, consider supporting MAP’s Community School for Life.

NFL player fired for supporting gay rights?


Zygi Wilf: Release Vikings’ complete discrimination investigation report to the public

Chris Kluwe
United States

Just in: the new food revolution starts NOW


 {UCS
Tell President Obama it’s time for a National Food Policy.

Mr. President, we want a food revolution.

Our food and agriculture system is broken. A National Food Policy would transform our food system to ensure healthy, sustainably grown food for all.

ACTION ALERT
Tell President Obama: It’s Time for a National Food Policy

 

Have you heard? In this weekend’s Washington Post, UCS joined prominent food leaders Michael Pollan, Mark Bittman, and Olivier de Schutter in a call to President Obama. It urges the president to do something bold and necessary: issue an executive order establishing a National Food Policy.

We all know our food and agriculture system is broken. For decades, UCS has demonstrated the costs of diet-related disease, the environmental toll of industrial agriculture practices, and the iron grip corporate giants have on information about what we eat. Government policies have contributed to this mess, and legislative attempts to fix it have been disjointed, lacked a clear direction, and often just made the problems worse.

A national policy for food, health, and well-being would, for the first time, define a comprehensive vision for our health, the sustainability of agricultural lands, and social and economic justice. It’s the first step toward the massive overhaul that we need to transform our food system to ensure healthy, sustainably grown food for all.

This won’t happen overnight. But right now, the real work begins—with you.

Sign the petition today to tell President Obama that you want a National Food Policy.

Take Action

Sincerely,
Ashley Elles
Ashley Elles
National Field Organizer
Food & Environment Program
Union of Concerned Scientists
Twitter: @acelles