~~ Fact Sheet ~~ Climate Change


budgetblow2climate
 Obama knows that climate change is real
CLIMATE CHANGE SCIENCE
A study published in May 2013 found that 97% of
scientists agree that man-made climate change is a
reality.
The scientific consensus is that climate change is
occurring, is caused largely by human activities, and
poses significant risks for public health and welfare.
There is no significant scientific disagreement on these
facts.
[NASA, accessed 7/6/2013]
Climate change is caused by increased levels of carbon
dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere, caused by human
activity like burning fossil fuels and land use changes.
CO2 traps energy from the sun, raising the earth’s
average temperature, and causing unpredictable—and
dangerous—effects.
[NASA, accessed 7/16/2013]
According to scientists, carbon dioxide levels in the
atmosphere are at the highest levels in 3-5 million years.
(New York Times, 5/10/2013)
Climate change is happening. The 12 hottest years on
record have all come in the last 15 years.  Severe storms,
the most severe drought in decades, and the worst
wildfires some states have ever seen have all occurred
in the past few years.
(NASA, 1/15/2013)
Heat waves, droughts, wildfires, and floods are all now
more frequent and intense, and are projected to worsen
in the future.
(USGCRP, 2009)
Climate change could cause sea levels to rise between
one to six feet within the next hundred years, causing
grave damage to coastal cities and communities.
[NOAA, 12/6/2012]
Climate change will have other severe economic
impacts, causing disruptions across our economy,
including in the energy, agricultural, and transportation
sectors.
[USGCRP, 2009]
GET THE FACTS
PRESIDENT OBAMA’S CLIMATE PLAN
PRINTED BY VOLUNTEERS
PRESIDENT OBAMA’S CLIMATE PLAN
President Obama has said that we must respond to the threat of climate change, knowing that the failure
to do so would betray our children and future generations. He called on Congress to take action, but made
it clear that if they won’t act, he will.
On Tuesday, June 25, President Obama laid out his vision for a common-sense plan to combat climate change
by reducing carbon pollution, preparing our country for the impacts of climate change, leading global efforts
to fight it, and putting America’s ingenuity to work. Details of the President’s plan can be found at barackobama.
com/climate.
As a nation of innovators, we will meet the challenge of climate change in a way that advances our economy,
our environment, and public health at the same time. We don’t have to choose between the health of our
children and the health of our economy. Taking action to reduce carbon pollution will spark new jobs and
industries building cleaner and more efficient American-made energy technologies.
OFA CLIMATE STRATEGY
1.
In order for the President to make the changes we
need to prevent the worst effects of climate change,
we need to change the conversation and the politics
on climate.
2.
OFA volunteers have a unique ability to advance
the President’s climate plan by raising the profile
of this important issue, taking on climate change
deniers in Congress, and advancing the clean
energy economy locally.
3.
Volunteers are organizing in congressional districts
across the country to work with supportive lawmakers
to lead on this issue, push lawmakers in the middle
who acknowledge the problem but have not supported
action on a solution, and take on the climate change
deniers whose extremism has been so damaging to
progress in Congress and to the public debate.
GET THE FACTS
PRESIDENT OBAMA’S CLIMATE PLAN
PRINTED BY VOLUNTEERS
4.
Volunteers are helping educate Americans about
their ability switch to clean energy—from cities
and counties working to adopt clean energy, to
individuals making their own everyday choices
about how they use energy.
5.
Volunteers are working to build support for the
President’s plan in Congress, and build support
for the EPA actions that will help America meet its
commitments to reduce the dangerous pollution
that causes climate change.
6.
All of this organizing will continue to advance
the conversation on climate, and bridge the gap
between public support for action and what
Congress is willing to do