on this day … 11/2 1983 – U.S. President Ronald Reagan signed a bill establishing a federal holiday on the third Monday of January in honor of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. 


1721 – Peter the Great (Peter I), ruler of Russia, changed his title to emperor.

1776 – During the American Revolutionary War, William Demont, became the first traitor of the American Revolution when he deserted.

1783 – U.S. Gen. George Washington gave his “Farewell Address to the Army” near Princeton, NJ.

1883 – Thomas Edison executed a patent application for an electrical indicator using the Edison effect lamp (U.S. Pat. 307,031).

1889 – North Dakota and South Dakota were admitted into the union as the 39th and 40th states.

1895 – In Chicago, IL, the first gasoline powered car contest took place in America.

1903 – Business and civic leader, Maggie L Walker, opens the St Luke Penny Savings Bank in Richmond, VA, blackfacts.com

1917 – British Foreign Secretary Arthur Balfour expressed support for a “national home” for the Jews of Palestine.

1920 – The first commercial radio station in the U.S., KDKA of Pittsburgh, PA, began regular broadcasting.

1921 – Margaret Sanger’s National Birth Control League combined with Mary Ware Denetts Voluntary Parenthood League to form the American Birth Control League.

1930 – Haile Selassie was crowned emperor of Ethiopia.

1930 – The DuPont Company announced the first synthetic rubber. It was named DuPrene.

1937 – The play “I’d Rather be Right” opened in New York City.

1947 – Howard Hughes flew his “Spruce Goose,” a huge wooden airplane, for eight minutes in California. It was the plane’s first and only flight. The “Spruce Goose,” nicknamed because of the white-gray color of the spruce used to build it, never went into production.

1948 – Harry S. Truman defeated Thomas E. Dewey for the U.S. presidency. The Chicago Tribune published an early edition that had the headline “DEWEY DEFEATS TRUMAN.” The Truman victory surprised many polls and newspapers. (Illinois>

1959 – Charles Van Doren, a game show contestant on the NBC-TV program “Twenty-One” admitted that he had been given questions and answers in advance.

1960 – In London, the novel “Lady Chatterly’s Lover,” was found not guilty of obscenity.

1962 – U.S. President Kennedy announced that the U.S.S.R. was dismantling the missile sites in Cuba.

1963 – South Vietnamese President Ngo Dihn Diem was assassinated in a military coup.

1966 – The Cuban Adjustment Act allows 123,000 Cubans to apply for permanent residence in the U.S.

1979 – Joanna Chesimard, a black militant escaped from a New Jersey prison, where she’d been serving a life sentence for the 1973 murder of a New Jersey state trooper.

1983 – U.S. President Ronald Reagan signed a bill establishing a federal holiday on the third Monday of January in honor of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. 

1984 – Velma Barfield became the first woman to be executed in the U.S. since 1962. She had been convicted of the poisoning death of her boyfriend.

1985 – The South African government imposed severe restrictions on television, radio and newspaper coverage of unrest by both local and foreign journalists.

1986 – The 12-by-16-inch celluloid of a poison apple from Walt Disney’s “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”” was purchased for $30,800.
Disney movies, music and books

1986 – American hostage David Jacobson was released after being held in Lebanon for 17 months by Shiite Muslims kidnappers.

1989 – Carmen Fasanella retired after 68 years and 243 days of taxicab service in Princeton, NJ.

1993 – Christie Todd Whitman was elected the first woman governor of New Jersey

1995 – The play “Sacrilege” opened.

1995 – The U.S. expelled Daiwa Bank Ltd. for allegedly covering up $1.1 billion in trading losses.

2001 – The computer-animated movie “Monsters, Inc.” opened. The film recorded the best debut ever for an animated film and the 6th best of all time.

2003 – In the U.S., the Episcopal Church diocese consecrated the church’s first openly gay bishop.

on this day 11/1 African-Americans are disenfranchised. The Mississippi Plan, approved on November 1, used literacy and “understanding” tests to disenfranchise black American citizens. Similar statutes were adopted by South Carolina (1895), Louisiana (1898), North Carolina (1900), Alabama (1901), Virginia (1901), Georgia (1908), and Oklahoma (1910).


1512 – Michelangelo’s paintings on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel were first exhibited to the public.

1604 – “Othello,” the tragedy by William Shakespeare, was first presented at Whitehall Palace in London. 

1611 – “The Tempest,” Shakespeare’s romantic comedy, was first presented at Whitehall Palace in London. 

1755 – At least 60,000 people were killed in Lisbon, Portugal by an earthquake, its aftershocks and the ensuing tsunami.

1765 – The British Parliament enacted The Stamp Act in the American colonies. The act was repealed in March of 1766 on the same day that the Parliament passed the Declaratory Acts which asserted that the British government had free and total legislative power of the colonies.

1800 – U.S. President John Adams became the first president to live in the White House when he moved in.

1848 – The first medical school for women, founded by Samuel Gregory, opened in Boston, MA. The Boston Female Medical School later merged with Boston University School of Medicine.

1856 – The first photography magazine, Daguerreian Journal, was published in New York City, NY.

1861 – Gen. George B. McClellan was made the general-in-chief of the American Union armies.

1864 – The U.S. Post Office started selling money orders. The money orders provided a safe way to payments by mail.

1870 – The U.S. Weather Bureau made its first meteorological observations using 24 locations that provided reports via telegraph. 

1879 – Thomas Edison executed his first patent application for a high-resistance carbon filament (U.S. Pat. 223,898).

1890 – African-Americans are disenfranchised. The Mississippi Plan, approved on November 1, used literacy and “understanding” tests to disenfranchise black American citizens. Similar statutes were adopted by South Carolina (1895), Louisiana (1898), North Carolina (1900), Alabama (1901), Virginia (1901), Georgia (1908), and Oklahoma (1910). blackfacts.com

1894 – “Billboard Advertising” was published for the first time. It later became known as “Billboard.”

1894 – Russian Emperor Alexander III died.

1898 – Allen, C. W. Self_leveling table Nov. 1, 1898 Patent No.613,436 blackfacts.com

1904 – The Army War College in Washington, DC, enrolled the first class.

1911 – Italy used planes to drop bombs on the Tanguira oasis in Libya. It was the first aerial bombing.

1936 – Benito Mussolini made a speech in Milan, Italy, in which he described the alliance between Italy and Nazi Germany as an “axis” running between Berlin and Rome.

1937 – “Hilltop House” was aired for the first time on CBS Radio.

1937 – “Terry and the Pirates” debuted on NBC Radio.

1940 – “A Night in the Tropics” was released. It was the first movie for Abbott and Costello.

1944 – “Harvey,” by Mary Chase, opened on Broadway.

1947 – The famous racehorse Man o’ War died.

1949 – In Washington, 55 people were killed when a fighter plane hit an airliner.

1950 – Two Puerto Rican nationalists tried to assassinate U.S. President Harry Truman. One of the men was killed when they tried to force their way into Blair House in Washington, DC.

1952 – The United States exploded the first hydrogen bomb on Eniwetok Atoll in the Marshall Islands.

1954 – Algeria began to rebel against French rule.

1959 – Jacques Plante, of the Montreal Canadiens, became the first goalie in the NHL to wear a mask.

1963 – The USSR launched Polyot I. It was the first satellite capable of maneuvering in all directions and able to change its orbit.

1968 – The movie rating system of G, M, R, X, followed by PG-13 and NC-17 went into effect.

1973 – Leon Jaworski was appointed the new Watergate special prosecutor in the Watergate case.

1979 – Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini urged all Iranians to demonstrate on November 4 and to expand their attacks against the U.S. and Israel. On November 4, Iranian militants seized the U.S. embassy in Tehran and took 63 Americans hostage.

1981 – The U.S. Postal Service raised the first-class letter rate to 20 cents.

1985 – In the village of Ignacio Aldama, 22 members of a Mexican anti-narcotics squad were killed by alleged drug traffickers.

1987 – Deng Xiaoping retired from China’s Communist Party’s Central Committee.

1989 – Tens of thousands of refugees to fled to the West when East Germany reopened its border with Czechoslovakia.

1989 – Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega announced the end of a cease-fire with the Contra rebels.

1993 – The European Community’s treaty on European unity took effect.

1994 – The Amazon.com domain name was registered.

1995 – In Dayton, OH, the Bosnian peace talks opened with the leaders of Bosnia, Serbia and Croatia present.

1998 – Nicaraguan Vice President Enrique Bolanos announced that between 1,000 and 1,500 people were buried in a 32-square mile area below the slopes of the Casita volcano in northern Nicaragua by a mudslide caused by Hurricane Mitch.

1998 – Iridium inaugurated the first handheld, global satellite phone and paging system.