1997 – Jesse K. Timmendequas was convicted in Trenton, NJ, of raping and strangling a 7-year-old neighbor, Megan Kanka. The 1994 murder inspired “Megan’s Law,” requiring that communities be notified when sex offenders move in.


California’s Megan’s Law was enacted in 1996 Penal Code § 290.46. It mandates the California Department of Justice (CA DOJ) to notify the public about specified registered sex offenders. Megan’s Law also authorizes local law enforcement agencies to notify the public about sex offender registrants found to be posing a risk to public safety. Megan’s Law is named after seven-year-old Megan Kanka, who was raped and killed by a known child molester who had moved across the street from the family without their knowledge. In the wake of that tragedy, the Kankas sought to have local communities warned about sex offenders in the area. All states in the U.S. now have some form of Megan’s Law.

The California Sex and Arson Registry is the source of sex offender information displayed on this website. This database contains registration information provided by the offender to local law enforcement agencies. This website indicates that some of the registrants are currently in violation of their registration requirements. Any information you may have on these individuals should be reported to your local law enforcement agency.

meganslaw.ca.gov.com

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