44 Women Who Have Run for President


 

Women Presidential Candidates

Women Who Ran for President

Who were the early women candidates for president? Hillary Clinton in her 2008 run for the Democratic nomination for US President came the closest so far that any woman has come to winning the nomination of a major political party in the United States. But Clinton is not the first woman to run for United States President, and not even the first to run for a major party’s nomination. Here’s a list of the female presidential candidates, arranged chronologically by each woman’s first campaign for the office. The list is current through the 2012 election; women running in 2016 will be added after that election’s over.

Who was the first woman to run for president?

What woman ran for US president first? And which women have run since?

73208640.jpg - Kean Collection/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

American feminist politician and radical Victoria Claflin Woodhull and her sister Tennessee Claflin attempt to assert their right to vote in New York and are denied, circa 1875. Kean Collection/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Victoria Woodhull

Equal Rights Party: 1872
Humanitarian Party: 1892

Victoria Woodhull was the first woman to run for president in the United States. Frederick Douglass was nominated as Vice President, but there’s no record that he accepted. Woodhull was also known for her radicalism as a woman suffrage activist and her role in a sex scandal involving noted preacher of the time, Henry Ward Beecher. More »

Belva Lockwood - Courtesy of the Library of Congress. Modifications © 2003 Jone Johnson Lewis.

Belva Lockwood. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. Modifications © 2003 Jone Johnson Lewis.

Belva Lockwood

National Equal Rights Party: 1884, 1888Belva Lockwood, an activist for voting rights for women and for African Americans, was also one of the earliest women lawyers in the United States. Her campaign for president in 1884 was the first full-scale national campaign of a woman running for president. More »

Laura Clay

Democratic Party, 1920Laura Clay, a Southern women’s rights advocate who supported state suffrage amendments so that the Southern states could limit suffrage to white women, had her name placed in nomination at the 1920 Democratic National Convention, to which she was a delegate. More »

Grace Allen

Surprise Party: 1940Comedian and actress, partner with husband George Burns on the George Burns and Gracie Allen Show, Grace Allen ran for president in 1940 as a publicity stunt. She was not on the ballot — it was, after all, a stunt — but she did get write-in votes.

Margaret Chase Smith

Republican Party: 1964She was the first woman to have her name placed in nomination for president at a major political party’s convention. She was also the first woman elected to serve in both the House of Representatives and the Senate. More »

Charlene Mitchell

Communist Party: 1968Nominated by the (tiny) Communist Party in 1968, Charlene Mitchell was the first African American woman nominated for president in the United States. She was on the ballot in two states in the general election, and received less than 1,100 votes nationally.

Shirley Chisholm Announcing Her Run for the Presidency 1972 - Don Hogan Charles/New York Times Co./Getty Images

Shirley Chisholm Announcing Her Run for the Presidency 1972. Don Hogan Charles/New York Times Co./Getty Images

Shirley Chisholm

Democratic Party: 1972A civil rights and women’s rights advocate, Shirley Chisholm ran for the Democratic nomination in 1972 with the slogan, “Unbought and Unbossed.” Her name was placed in nomination at the 1972 convention, and she won 152 delegates. More »

Patsy Takemoto Mink

Democratic Party: 1972She was the first Asian American to seek nomination as president by a major political party. She was on the Oregon primary ballot in 1972. She was at that time a member of the U.S. Congress, elected from Hawaii.

Bella Abzug in 1971 - Tim Boxer/Getty Images

Bella Abzug in 1971. Tim Boxer/Getty Images

Bella Abzug

Democratic Party: 1972One of three women to seek the Democratic Party nomination for president in 1972, Abzug was at the time a member of Congress from the West Side of Manhattan. More »

Linda Osteen Jenness

Socialist Workers Party: 1972Underage for the Constitution’s requirements for the presidency, Linda Jenness ran against Nixon in 1972 and was on the ballot in 25 states. In three states where Jenness was not accepted for the ballot because of her age, Evelyn Reed was in the presidential slot. Their vote total was less than 70,000 nationally.

Truly remarkable African American women


TRULY REMARKABLE AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN
March is Women’s History Month and the National Museum of African American History and Culture is shining a spotlight on remarkable African American women who overcame racism and gender discrimination to shape our nation’s history.

Here are just three of the pioneering African American women who the Museum is honoring this month – amazing individuals whose stories every American should know!

  • Mary McLeod BethuneMary McLeod Bethune was an educator, civil rights activist, stateswoman, and philanthropist. Born in 1875 to parents who had been enslaved, Bethune developed an early belief in the power of education and attended college – a rare achievement for African American women at the time. In 1904, she started a private school for African American girls in Florida that later grew to become Bethune-Cookman College. Bethune went on to become a leading advocate for black Americans, particularly women, and founded the National Council of Negro Women in 1935. A close friend of President Franklin Roosevelt and his wife Eleanor, she served in the “Black Cabinet”, an advisory board to the Roosevelt Administration on issues facing African Americans. Bethune died on May 18, 1955.
  • Shirley ChisholmU.S. Rep. Shirley Chisholm, was the first black woman elected to the U.S. Congress and the first major-party African American candidate for president. Born to immigrant parents from Guyana and Barbados on November 30, 1924, she distinguished herself early as a dedicated student and skilled debater. She graduated from Brooklyn College in 1946 and later earned a master’s degree in elementary education from Columbia University. After working as an educator, Chisholm launched her political career, winning a seat in the New York State Assembly in 1965. In 1968, she was elected to Congress, where she served seven terms. In 1972, she waged her historic campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination, a quest chronicled in the award-winning 2005 documentary Shirley Chisholm ’72: Unbought and Unbossed, directed and produced by African-American filmmaker Shola Lynch. Chisholm died on January 1, 2005.
  • Henrietta Lacks was the unwitting source of the first human immortal cell line – now known as the “HeLa” cell line – which has been used in vaccine and treatment research, gene mapping, chemical safety testing and countless other scientific pursuits. She was born on August 1, 1920, and went on to have five children. After the birth of her last child, a cancerous tumor was discovered on her cervix. Cells taken from the tumor without her consent were cultured to become the HeLa line. Unfortunately, the cancer metastasized throughout Lack’s body, and she died on October 4, 1951. Her life and legacy are celebrated in Rebecca Skloot’s best-selling 2010 book “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks”, which was featured in Oprah’s book club.

When we open our Museum’s doors on September 24, 2016, these women and other notable African Americans – both well-known and the nearly forgotten – will finally receive the recognition they are due. And as a supporter, you can take personal pride in helping to bring the stories of these African American heroes to life.

Thank you for everything you’ve done to make the National Museum of African American History and Culture a reality!

Lonnie Bunch All the Best,
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Lonnie G. Bunch
Founding Director

P.S. We can only reach our $270 million goal with your help. I hope you will consider joining as a Charter Member or making straight gift donation today.

Clothes : Can they be ethical … a repost


beaseedforchangestickersGREENjust another rant …

Second hand or flea market shopping has been in the news occasionally for years and as folks join the movement to keep material out of landfills or reduce their eco-footprint; some push buy made in the US of A only; while others believe reusing is best. The problem that needs to be addressed over and over is, how toxic are the material used for fashions?

The idea of wearing toxic fashions let alone recycling it is a disturbing thought given what we now know and at the end of the day, it always seems to go back to making that dollar dollar

There are a few who do 2ndhand because of financial issues, some wear it for personal reasons and even more, are on that path toward sustainable living, but as a whole 2nd hand, up-cycling or living Eco-friendly seems are great names but being ethically stylish? I guess that means intentionally buying, wearing, devoting your dollar dollars to sustainably made only. The fact is …it is a lot tougher than folks think. Have you looked at your clothing labels?

The dictionary states that being ethical means acting in an ethical manner from an ethical point of view. Being “ethically stylish” is almost a mission impossible.  Before you say she needs more education; don’t get me wrong because I definitely get being “ethically stylish,” “acting with intent” but when store buyers, the fashion industry and whatnot go out of their way to use cheap labor or toxic material, being ethical demands that the industry cooperate as well lest we talk about where the industry gets their material … and sadly the industry isn’t as vital here

Unfortunately, this is an ongoing fight and here we are in the year 2020.  I wonder, have other people bought and overpaid for a dress or two over the years; tried buying American made only as well but found more often than not; I buy because of the “cute factor” first then price while looking at the tags later finding that it was not made in the US of A or out of sustainable material, which definitely offends the “ethically stylish “code.  Sometime in the ’90s, word got out that the likelihood of fashion corporations outsourcing work because it was more cost-effective, the material was cheap and maybe not so sustainable yet meant more for the money;  remember when big-name models, entertainment folks and designers were caught using sweatshops. Levis’s, once thought to only be made here are imported as well and the 501’s which are my favorite can have insane prices though more sustainable.

Back in the day,  hearing the fashion industry in all its forms, say they are selling or being more ethically stylish was frustrating.  There were always reports of companies and brands, which sell the USA, made, but may among others in the industry possibly be using toxic materials.  This news made the giant move toward 100% Organic, Natural or Sustainable take several giant steps backward to rehash rethink who when why when and with what.  America needs to buy and sell local, but again, almost a mission impossible as” Made in America” is not only more expensive the labels are far and few these days, the material is often blended with stuff we cannot pronounce. The history of the fashion industry and American Made is definitely a love-hate thing as designers and stars back in the day were wearing fabulous clothes rarely found on the racks, only to find out they were actually getting their clothes made by sweatshops, in some well-known and unknown countries …  and sustainable; probably not.

Yes, “Made in the USA” faded out to a blank whiteboard and the NYC garment district was but a memory for quite a while. There were some great “Where and what are they doing now” shows with older “go to” fashion designers, clothiers stating the fabric just is not the same nor are the people. The opportunity to make more clothes with cheap labor & material seemed to have become addictive and the image of what was going on in those countries is not good.   Fashion will always be a work in progress, but learning that unfair labor practices and or that companies are producing great looking garments, but possibly using toxic material since or before is sad considering all that has happened to the industry over the years. Thus, making it tough to be ethical let alone wear fashion that is ethically stylish or sustainable.

I still buy using the cute fit fab factor while believing in reuse reclaim repurpose redecorate  and reduce too … which keeps most material out of landfills

FYI … this was written back in November of 2012