1867 – Blacks voted in the municipal election in Tuscumbia, AL.


The Alabama 1867 voter registration records were created as a direct result of a Reconstruction Act passed by the United States Congress on March 23, 1867. The act required the commanding officer in each military district to hold, before September 1, 1867, a registration of all male citizens, 21 years and older, in each county who were also qualified to vote and who had taken the loyalty oath.

Alabama 1867 Voter Registration Records Database alabama.gov
Several Alabama counties were not yet established at the time of the 1867 voter registration: Chilton, Cullman, Escambia, Geneva, and Houston. There is no voter registration book available for Clarke County.

The books for the following counties were severely damaged from mold: Dallas; Franklin; Lauderdale; Limestone; Lowndes; Monroe; Randolph; and Washington. Some information may be missing due to the extent of the mold damage.

.About the Database | History | Corrections to the Database | Search

About the Database
This database was created by staff and volunteers from the entries in the 131 volumes of the 1867 Voter Registration Records maintained by the Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH). The volumes are significant genealogical records as this is one of the first statewide government documents that record African-American males living in Alabama. Because no index existed for individual volumes or for the records as a whole, and because of the deteriorating condition of the records, in 2004 ADAH staff began scanning the documents and keying the data from each entry into a computer database. When a successful search retrieves a name from the database, an image of the page where the entry resides will also be available for your use.

In creating the database, staff and volunteers were instructed to copy the entries exactly as they are written in each volume, to the best of their ability in interpreting the handwriting. If a staff member was unable to determine the spelling of an entry, s/he placed a question mark within brackets to indicate that the name/spelling is uncertain.

There are several points that users should understand about the 1867 Voter Registration Records before using the database. 1) Because the local military authorities responsible for registering individuals in 1867 may have interpreted the Act (see History) regarding the creation of the records differently, a number of otherwise eligible citizens living in the county may not be reflected in the volumes. 2) Each volume has columns for the following information: Name, Race, County of residence, Precinct, Length of residence (in state, in county, in precinct), Book and page where the individual’s Loyalty Oath” (Loyalty Oath series closed due to condition. Appointment required for viewing.) is recorded, Native country or state, and other remarks. However, not every entry includes each piece of information. 3) Many entries have the first names abbreviated. The common abbreviations used are:

Chas = Charles
Geo = George
Danl = Daniel
Jas = James
Jno = John
Jos = Joseph
Robt = Robert
Thos = Thomas
Wash = Washington
Wm = William

History
The Alabama 1867 voter registration records were created as a direct result of a Reconstruction Act passed by the United States Congress on March 23, 1867. The act required the commanding officer in each military district to hold, before September 1, 1867, a registration of all male citizens, 21 years and older, in each county who were also qualified to vote and who had taken the loyalty oath. (See http://www.legislature.state.al.us/misc/history/constitutions/1868/1868enablinginst.html for full text of the act.) Each registrant visited the local registration office, took the oath, and was listed in the Voter Registration record.

Corrections to the Database:
Staff members will do their best to make any corrections to obvious misspellings or errors in data entry.

Alabama 1867 Voter Registration Records Database
Several Alabama counties were not yet established at the time of the 1867 voter registration: Chilton, Cullman, Escambia, Geneva, and Houston. There is no voter registration book available for Clarke County.

The books for the following counties were severely damaged from mold: Dallas; Franklin; Lauderdale; Limestone; Lowndes; Monroe; Randolph; and Washington. Some information may be missing due to the extent of the mold damage.

About the Database
This database was created by staff and volunteers from the entries in the 131 volumes of the 1867 Voter Registration Records maintained by the Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH). The volumes are significant genealogical records as this is one of the first statewide government documents that record African-American males living in Alabama. Because no index existed for individual volumes or for the records as a whole, and because of the deteriorating condition of the records, in 2004 ADAH staff began scanning the documents and keying the data from each entry into a computer database. When a successful search retrieves a name from the database, an image of the page where the entry resides will also be available for your use.

In creating the database, staff and volunteers were instructed to copy the entries exactly as they are written in each volume, to the best of their ability in interpreting the handwriting. If a staff member was unable to determine the spelling of an entry, s/he placed a question mark within brackets to indicate that the name/spelling is uncertain.

There are several points that users should understand about the 1867 Voter Registration Records before using the database. 1) Because the local military authorities responsible for registering individuals in 1867 may have interpreted the Act (see History) regarding the creation of the records differently, a number of otherwise eligible citizens living in the county may not be reflected in the volumes. 2) Each volume has columns for the following information: Name, Race, County of residence, Precinct, Length of residence (in state, in county, in precinct), Book and page where the individual’s Loyalty Oath” (Loyalty Oath series closed due to condition. Appointment required for viewing.) is recorded, Native country or state, and other remarks. However, not every entry includes each piece of information. 3) Many entries have the first names abbreviated. The common abbreviations used are:

Chas = Charles
Geo = George
Danl = Daniel
Jas = James
Jno = John
Jos = Joseph
Robt = Robert
Thos = Thomas
Wash = Washington
Wm = William

History
The Alabama 1867 voter registration records were created as a direct result of a Reconstruction Act passed by the United States Congress on March 23, 1867. The act required the commanding officer in each military district to hold, before September 1, 1867, a registration of all male citizens, 21 years and older, in each county who were also qualified to vote and who had taken the loyalty oath. (See http://www.legislature.state.al.us/misc/history/constitutions/1868/1868enablinginst.html for full text of the act.) Each registrant visited the local registration office, took the oath, and was listed in the Voter Registration record.

Corrections to the Database:
Staff members will do their best to make any corrections to obvious misspellings or errors in data entry.

ancestry.com

alabama.gov

Women In Technology – Women’s History Month


Code Like A Girl

Will You Help Us Grow Our Community?

https://www.pexels.com/photo/amplifier-audio-blur-close-up-39343/

Thank you.

Thank you for reading this article.

Thank you for caring about Women In Technology.

Thank you for sharing your time, your interest, and your comments with all of us at Code Like A Girl.

It has been an amazing first year for us. I’m amazed that we have more than 350 articles, written by more than 200 authors! In just the last 3 months, our readers have spent about 3500 hours reading Code Like A Girl articles. To put that in perspective, the last 3 months combine for a total of 2160 hours. If you read 24 hours a day, you’d have to read for 145 days to read what Code Like A Girl readers read in the last 90 days.

We now have more that 16, 000 followers and we’re growing fast — with more than 2000 new followers in the last 30 days. That is an amazing community we’ve built together in just over a year.

Community is a powerful thing. I ❤ Community. I remember getting my first taste of what participating in, building and leading a community could be when I was a teenager. At that time, I had two places where I was soaking up everything I could about community: Grand River Collegiate Institute and the AR Kaufmann YMCA.

In both places, I had the opportunity, which I am very grateful for, to belong. At my high-school, Grand River Collegiate Institute, I became involved in theatre and school paper. I made friends and learned skills that continue to be an important part of my life today. At my local YMCA, I was mentored as a camp leader and eventually worked summers as a camp counsellor.

Since then I’ve worked on conferences, election campaigns, started tech meet-ups, sat on boards, and volunteered around the world. Here’s one of the most important lessons I’ve ever learned about community: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed, citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”

This quote by Margaret Mead is one that has inspired me for a long time. I guess I consider myself to be a thoughtful and committed citizen — so Mead’s words feel like they are being spoken to me. I am certainly an optimist with a great deal of hope for the future. That hope is founded on my belief that things can get better and we can, each of us, make a difference. I also believe that together — that difference can change the world.

That’s what this publication is all about. Code Like A Girl is a publication that celebrates redefining society’s perceptions of women in technology. The world of Women in Technology is changing — for the better. Not always and not in every way, but we are making progress. Our mission, at Code Like A Girl, is to amplify the voices that are driving this change — a community of thoughtful, committed citizens who are trying to change the world.

I started this by saying Thank You and sharing some stats about Code Like A Girl. Here’s one I didn’t share with you. According to toppub.xyz Code Like A Girl is currently ranked at 104th by followers. That’s amazing. It’s an accomplishment we’re very proud of. But we think we can do better — we need to do better. And we need your help. Today.

We need your help to get us into the top 100. Why is this important? Is this just a vanity metric? Perhaps, but there is something significant about this kind of measurement. It helps demonstrate the traction of this project within the context of Medium.com’s publication ecosystem. It provides a simple and easy message about our growth and stature. This objective is about accelerating our growth, to grow a larger audience — to grow our community.

Here’s how we’re going to work together to achieve this outcome. Our goal is to add 5000 new followers by the end of March 2017. We need your to help by introducing Code Like A Girl to your network. This isn’t about posting a meme on your feed (although that could be pretty cool too). This is about genuine and authentic sharing about something you care about and want to see continue to succeed and grow.

Our mission is to amplify the voices that are celebrating the changing role of women in technology. Please help us by participating in our #AmpCodeLikeAGirl campaign.

We are asking you to introduce 5 people you know to Code Like A girl over the next 25 days. We’re also asking you to spread the word, share your favourite Code Like A Girl article on FB, Twitter and LinkedIn and tag it with the hashtag #AmpCodeLikeAGirl.

We need your help over the next 25 days. We need you to introduce Code Like A Girl to 5 new people.

When someone in your network follows us, they can post about it with the #AmpCodeLikeAGirl hashtag, sharing something like:

“Hey — I just followed Code Like A Girl, an awesome publication about #WomenInTech http://code.likeagirl.io/ #AmpCodeLikeAGirl” or their own message.

You can also invite them to comment on this article — we’d love to hear from new followers as we work together to #AmpCodeLikeAGirl.

Thanks!

on this day … 3/23 1889 – U.S. President Harrison opened Oklahoma for white colonization.


1026 – Koenraad II crowned himself king of Italy.

1066 – The 18th recorded perihelion passage of Halley’s Comet took place.

1490 – The first dated edition of Maimonides “Mishna Torah” was published.

1657 – France and England formed an alliance against Spain.

1775 – American revolutionary Patrick Henry declared, “give me liberty, or give me death!”

1794 – Josiah G. Pierson patented a rivet machine.

1806 – Explorers Lewis and Clark, reached the Pacific coast, and began their return journey to the east.

1808 – Napoleon’s brother Joseph took the throne of Spain.

1835 – Charles Darwin reached Los Arenales, in the Andes.

1836 – The coin press was invented by Franklin Beale.

1839 – The first recorded printed use of “OK” [oll korrect] occurred in Boston’s Morning Post.

1840 – The first successful photo of the Moon was taken.

1848 – Hungary proclaimed its independence of Austria.

1857 – Elisha Otis installed the first modern passenger elevator in a public building. It was at the corner of Broome Street and Broadway in New York City.

1858 – Eleazer A. Gardner patented the cable streetcar.

1861 – John D. Defrees became the first Superintendent of the United States Government Printing Office.

1861 – London’s first tramcars began operations.

1868 – The University of California was founded in Oakland, CA.

1880 – John Stevens patented the grain crushing mill. The mill increased flour production by 70 percent.

1881 – The Boers and Britain signed a peace accord ending the first Boer war.

1881 – A gas lamp caused a fire in an opera house in Nice, France. 70 people were killed.

1889 – U.S. President Harrison opened Oklahoma for white colonization.

1901 – Dame Nellie Melba, revealed the secret of her now famous toast.

1901 – It was learned that Boers were starving in British concentration camps in South Africa.

1901 – Shots were fired at Privy Councilor Pobyedonostzev, who was considered to be Russia’s most hated man.

1902 – In Italy, the minimum legal working age was raised from 9 to 12 for boys and from 11 to 15 for girls.

1903 – The Wright brothers obtained an airplane patent.

1903 – U.S. troops were sent to Honduras to protect the American consulate during revolutionary activity.

1909 – British Lt. Shackleton found the magnetic South Pole.

1909 – Theodore Roosevelt began an African safari sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution and National Geographic Society.

1910 – In the Canary Islands, women offered candidates for legislative elections.

1912 – The Dixie Cup was invented.

1917 – Austrian Emperor Charles I made a peace proposal to French President Poincare.

1917 – In the Midwest U.S., four tornadoes kill 211 people over a four day period.

1918 – Lithuania proclaimed independence.

1919 – Benito Mussolini founded his Fascist political movement in Milan, Italy.

1920 – Britain denounced the U.S. because of their delay in joining the League of Nations.

1920 – The Perserikatan Communist of India (PKI) political party was formed.

1921 – Arthur G. Hamilton set a new parachute record when he safely jumped from 24,400 feet.

1922 – The first airplane landed at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC.

1932 – In the U.S., the Norris-LaGuardia Act established workers’ right to strike.

1933 – The German Reichstag adopted the Enabling Act. The act effectively granted Adolf Hitler dictatorial legislative powers.

1934 – The U.S. Congress accepted the independence of the Philippines in 1945.

1936 – Italy, Austria & Hungary signed the Pact of Rome.

1937 – The L.A. Railway Co. started using PCC streetcars.

1940 – “Truth or Consequences” was heard on radio for the first time.

1942 – The Japanese occupy the Andaman Islands.

1942 – During World War II, the U.S. government began evacuating Japanese-Americans from West Coast homes to detention centers.

1950 – “Beat the Clock” premiered on CBS-TV.

1951 – U.S. paratroopers descended from flying boxcars in a surprise attack in Korea.

1956 – Pakistan became the first Islamic republic. It was still within the British Commonwealth.

1956 – Sudan became independent.

1957 – The U.S. Army sold the last of its homing pigeons.

1965 – America’s first two-person space flight took off from Cape Kennedy with astronauts Virgil I. Grissom and John W. Young aboard. The craft was the Gemini 3.

1965 – The Moroccan Army shot at demonstrators. About 100 people were killed.

1967 – Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. called the Vietnam War the biggest obstacle to the civil rights movement.

1970 – Mafia “Boss” Carlo Gambino was arrested for plotting to steal $3 million.

1972 – The U.S. called a halt to the peace talks on Vietnam being held in Paris.

1972 – Evel Knievel broke 93 bones after successfully jumping 35 cars.

1973 – The last airing of “Concentration” took place. The show had been on NBC for 15 years.

1980 – The deposed shah of Iran, Muhammad Riza Pahlavi, left Panama for Egypt.

1981 – U.S. Supreme Court upheld a law making statutory rape a crime for men but not women.

1981 – CBS Television announced plans to reduce “Captain Kangaroo” to a 30-minute show each weekday morning.

1983 – U.S. President Reagan first proposed development of technology to intercept enemy missiles. The proposal became known as the Strategic Defense Initiative and “Star Wars.”

1983 – Dr. Barney Clark died after 112 days with a permanent artificial heart.

1989 – A 1,000-foot diameter asteroid missed Earth by 500,000 miles.

1989 – Joel Steinberg was sentenced to 25 years for killing his adopted daughter.

1989 – Two electrochemists, Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischman, announced that they had created nuclear fusion in a test tube at room temperature.

1990 – Former Exxon Valdez Captain Joseph Hazelwood was ordered to help clean up Prince William Sound and pay $50,000 in restitution for the 1989 oil spill.

1993 – U.N. experts announced that record ozone lows had been registered over a large area of the Western Hemisphere.

1994 – Luis Donaldo Colosio, Mexico’s leading presidential candidate, was assassinated in Tijuana. Mario Aburto Martinez was arrested at the scene and confessed to the killing.

1994 – Wayne Gretzky broke Gordie Howe‘s National Hockey League (NHL) career record with his 802nd goal.

1994 – Howard Stern formally announced his Libertarian run for New York governor.

1996 – Taiwan held its first democratic presidential elections.

1998 – Germany’s largest bank pledged $3.1 million to Jewish foundations as restitution for Nazi looting.

1998 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that term limits for state lawmakers were constitutional.

1998 – Russian President Boris Yeltsin fired his Cabinet.

1998 – The movie “Titanic” won 11 Oscars at the Academy Awards.

1998 – The German company Bertelsmann AG agreed to purchase the American publisher Random House for $1.4 billion. The merger created the largest English-language book-publishing company in the world.

1999 – Paraguay’s Vice President Luis Maria Argana was shot to death by two gunmen.

1999 – NATO Secretary-General Javier Solana gave formal approval for air strikes against Serbian targets.

1999 – Near Mandi Bahauddin, Pakistan, a bus fell into a fast-moving canal. Nine were confirmed dead, 31 were missing and presumed dead, and 20 were injured.

2001 – Russia’s orbiting Mir space station plunged into the South Pacific after its 15-years of use.