on this day … 8/6 1965 – The Voting Rights Act was signed by U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson. 


1787 – At the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia debate began on the first draft of the U.S. Constitution. 

1806 – The Holy Roman Empire went out of existence as Emperor Francis II abdicated.

1825 – Bolivia declared independence from Peru.

1879 – The first Australian rules football game to be played at night took place at the Melbourne Cricket Ground. The game was to promote the introduction of electricity to the city of Melbourne.

1890 – Cy Young achieved his first major league victory. He would accumulate 511 in his career.

1914 – Austria-Hungary declared war against Russia. Serbia declared war against Germany.

1926 – Gertrude Ederle became the first American woman to swim the English Channel. She was 19 years old at the time. The swim took her 14 1/2 hours. 

1926 – Warner Brothers premiered its Vitaphone system in New York. The movie was “Don Juan,” starring John Barrymore.

1945 – The American B-29 bomber, known as the Enola Gay, dropped the first atomic bomb on an inhabited area. The bomb named “Little Boy” was dropped over the center of Hiroshima, Japan. An estimated 140,000 people were killed. (8:16am Japanese time) 

1949 – Chicago White Sox player Luke Appling played in the 2,154th game of his 19-year, major league career.

1952 – Satchel Paige, at age 46, became the oldest pitcher to complete a major league baseball game. 

1960 – Nationalization of U.S. and foreign-owned property in Cuba began. 

1962 – Jamaica became an independent dominion within the British Commonwealth. 

1965 – The Voting Rights Act was signed by U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson

1969 – The first fair ball to be hit completely out of Dodger Stadium occurred. Willie “Pops” Stargell, of the Pittsburgh Pirates, hit the ball 506 feet from home plate.

1981 – Fire fighters in Indianapolis, IN, answered a false alarm. When they returned to their station it was ablaze due to a grease fire.

1981 – Lee Trevino was disqualified from the PGA Championship in Duluth, GA when he had his scorecard signed by Tom Weiskopf instead of himself.

1985 – The 40th anniversary of the Hiroshima atomic bombing brought tens of thousands of Japanese and foreigners to Hiroshima. 

1986 – William J. Schroeder died. He lived 620 days with the Jarvik-7 manmade heart. He was the world’s longest surviving recipient of a permanent artificial heart.

1986 – Timothy Dalton became the fourth actor to be named “James Bond.”

1989 – Jaime Paz Zamora was inaugurated as the president of Bolivia.

1990 – The U.N. Security Council ordered a worldwide trade embargo with Iraq. The embargo was to punish Iraq for invading Kuwait.

1993 – The U.S. Senate confirmed Louis Freeh to be the director of the FBI.

1993 – Morihiro Hosokawa was elected prime minister of Japan.

1995 – Thousands of glowing lanterns were set afloat in rivers in Hiroshima, Japan, on the 50th anniversary of the first atomic bombing. 

1996 – NASA announced the discovery of evidence of primitive life on Mars. The evidence came in the form of a meteorite that was found in Antarctica. The meteorite was believed to have come from Mars and contained a fossil. 

1997 – Apple Computer and Microsoft agreed to share technology in a deal giving Microsoft a stake in Apple’s survival.

2012 – The Mars rover Curiosity landed on the floor of Gale Crater. The Mars Science Laboratory/Curiosity spacecraft launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL, on November 26, 2011.

1965 – The Voting Rights Act was signed by U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson.


The National Voting Rights Act of 1965 (42 U.S.C. § 1973–1973aa-6) outlawed discriminatory voting practices that had been responsible for the widespread disenfranchisement of African Americans in the United States.

Echoing the language of the 15th Amendment, the Act prohibited states from imposing any “voting qualification or prerequisite to voting, or standard, practice, or procedure … to deny or abridge the right of any citizen of the United States to vote on account of race or color.” Specifically, Congress intended the Act to outlaw the practice of requiring otherwise qualified voters to pass literacy tests in order to register to vote, a principal means by which Southern states had prevented African-Americans from exercising the franchise. The Act was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson, a Democrat, who had earlier signed the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964 into law.

worldhistoryproject.org  by rob brent/wiki

The Act established extensive federal oversight of elections administration, providing that states with a history of discriminatory voting practices (so-called “covered jurisdictions”) could not implement any change affecting voting without first obtaining the approval of the Department of Justice, a process known as preclearance. These enforcement provisions applied to states and political subdivisions (mostly in the South) that had used a “device” to limit voting and in which less than 50 percent of the population was registered to vote in 1964. Congress has amended and extended the Act several times since its original passage, the most recent being the 25-year extension signed by President George W. Bush.

The Act is widely considered a landmark in civil-rights legislation, though some of its provisions have sparked political controversy. During the debate over the 2006 extension, some Republican members of Congress objected to renewing the preclearance requirement (the Act’s primary enforcement provision), arguing that it represents an overreach of federal power and places unwarranted bureaucratic demands on Southern states that have long since abandoned the discriminatory practices the Act was meant to eradicate. Conservative legislators also opposed requiring states with large Spanish-speaking populations to provide bilingual ballots. Congress nonetheless voted to extend the Act for twenty-five years with its original enforcement provisions left intact.