1973 Roe V Wade



1973 – Abortion became legal in the U.S. as the Supreme Court announced its decision in the case of Roe vs. Wade striking down local state laws restricting abortions in the first six months of pregnancy. In more recent rulings (1989 and 1992) the Court upheld the power of individual states to impose some restrictions.

By Patricia Yuu Pan
Roe versus Wade, better known as Roe v. Wade, is the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion within the first two months of pregnancy. Up until then, individual state laws regulated abortions thereby forcing women to illegal clinics or untrained practitioners. The lack of proper medical supervision in these situations was dangerous for the women.

The case was appealed and landed in the U.S. Supreme Court. On January 22, 1973, the Court handed down its decision in favor of Roe, declaring:
[The] right to privacy, whether it be founded in the Fourteenth Amendment’s concept of personal liberty and restrictions upon state action, as we feel it is, or, as the district court determined, in the Ninth Amendment’s reservation of rights to the people, is broad enough to encompass a woman’s decision whether or not to terminate her pregnancy.”

for more: dummies.com

History… January 22


1666 – Shah Jahan, a descendant of Genghis Khan and Timur, died at the age of 74. He was the Mongul emperor of India that built the Taj Mahal as a mausoleum for his wife Mumtaz-i-Mahal.

1771 – The Falkland Islands were ceded to Britain by Spain.

1824 – The Asante army crushed British troops in the Gold Coast.

1879 – James Shields began a term as a U.S. Senator from Missouri. He had previously served Illinois and Minnesota. He was the first Senator to serve three states.

1879 – British troops were massacred by the Zulus at Isandhlwana.

1889 – The Columbia Phonograph Company was formed in Washington, DC.

1895 – The National Association of Manufacturers was organized in Cincinnati, OH.

1900 – Off of South Africa, the British released the German steamer Herzog, which had been seized on January 6.

1901 – Queen Victoria of England died after reigning for nearly 64 years. Edward VII, her son, succeeded her.

1903 – The Hay-Herrán Treaty was signed by United States Secretary of State John M. Hay and Colombian Chargé Dr. Tomás Herrán. The treaty granted the United States rights to the land proposed for the Panama Canal.

1905 – Insurgent workers were fired on in St Petersburg, Russia, resulting in “Bloody Sunday.” 500 people were killed.

1917 – U.S. President Wilson pleaded for an end to war in Europe, calling for “peace without victory.” America entered the war the following April.

1924 – Ramsay MacDonald became Britain’s first Labour Prime Minister.

1930 – In New York, excavation began for the Empire State Building.

1936 – In Paris, Premier Pierre Laval resigned over diplomatic failure in the Ethiopian crisis.

1938 – “Our Town,” by Thornton Wilder, was performed publicly for the first time, in Princeton, NJ.

1941 – Britain captured Tobruk from German forces.

1944 – Allied forces began landing at Anzio, Italy, during World War II.

1947 – KTLA, Channel 5, in Hollywood, CA, began operation as the first commercial television station west of the Mississippi River.

1950 – Alger Hiss, a former adviser to U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt, was convicted of perjury for denying contacts with a Soviet agent. He was sentenced to five years in prison.

1951 – Fidel Castro was ejected from a Winter League baseball game after hitting a batter. He later gave up baseball for politics.

1953 – The Arthur Miller drama “The Crucible” opened on Broadway.

1956 – Raymond Burr starred as Captain Lee Quince in the “Fort Laramie” debut on CBS radio.

1957 – Suspected “Mad Bomber” was arrested in Waterbury, CT. George P. Metesky was accused of planting more than 30 explosive devices in the New York City area.

1957 – The Israeli army withdrew from the Sinai. They had invaded Egypt on October 29, 1956.

1959 – British world racing champion Mike Hawthorn was killed while driving on the Guildford bypass.

1961 – Wilma Rudolph, set a world indoor record in the women’s 60-yard dash. She ran the race in 6.9 seconds.

1962 – Cuba’s membership in the Organization of American States (OAS) was suspended.

1964 – Kenneth Kaunda was sworn in as the first Prime Minister of Northern Rhodesia.

1968 – “Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In”, debuted on NBC TV.

1970 – The first regularly scheduled commercial flight of the Boeing 747 began in New York City and ended in London about 6 1/2 hours later.

1972 – The United Kingdom, the Irish Republic, and Denmark joined the EEC.

1973 – Joe Frazier lost the first fight of his professional career to George Foreman. He had been the undefeated heavyweight world champion since February 16, 1970 when he knocked out Jimmy Ellis.

1973 – The U.S. Supreme Court struck down state laws that had been restricting abortions during the first six months of pregnancy. The case (Roe vs. Wade) legalized abortion.

1983 – Bjorn Borg retired from tennis. He had set a record by winning 5 consecutive Wimbledon championships.

1984 – Apple introduced the Macintosh during the third quarter of Super Bowl XVIII.

1987 – Phil Donahue became the first talk show host to tape a show from inside the Soviet Union. The shows were shown later in the year.

1992 – Rebel soldiers seized the national radio station in Kinshasa, Zaire’s capital, and broadcast a demand for the government’s resignation.

1995 – Two Palestinian suicide bombers from the Gaza Strip detonated powerful explosives at a military transit point in central Israel, killing 19 Israelis.

1997 – The U.S. Senate confirmed Madeleine Albright as the first female secretary of state.

1998 – Theodore Kaczynski pled guilty to federal charges for his role as the Unabomber. He agreed to life in prison without parole.

2000 – Elian Gonzalez’s grandmothers met privately with U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno as they appealed for help in removing the boy from his Florida relatives and reuniting him with his father in Cuba.

2001 – Former National Football League (NFL) player Rae Carruth was sentenced to a minimum 18 years and 11 months in prison for his role in the 1999 shooting death of his pregnant girlfriend, Cherica Adams. Adams died a month later from her wounds. The baby survived and lives with the victim’s mother.

2001 – Acting on a tip, authorities captured four of the “Texas 7” in Woodland Park, CO, at a convenience store. A fifth convict killed himself inside a motor home.

2002 – In Calcutta, India, Heavily armed gunmen attacked the U.S. government cultural center. Five police officers were killed and twenty others, including one pedestrian and one private security guard, were wounded.

2002 – Lawyers suing Enron Corp. asked a court to prevent further shredding of documents due to the pending federal investigation.

2002 – Amazon.com announced that it had posted its first net profit in the fourth quarter (quarter ending December 31, 2001).

2002 – AOL Time Warner filed suit against Microsoft in federal court seeking damages for harm done to AOL’s Netscape Internet Browser when Microsoft began giving away its competing browser.

2002 – Marc Chagall’s work “Study for ‘Over Vitebsk” was found at a postal installation in Topeka, KS. The 8×10 oil painting is valued at about $1 million. The work was stolen a year before from the Jewish Museum in New York City.

2002 – Kmart Corp. filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy making it the largest retailer in history to seek legal protection from its creditors.

2003 – In New York, the “Leonardo da Vinci, Master Draftsmen” exhibit opened at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

2003 – It was reported that scientists in China had found fossilized remains of a dinosaur with four feathered wings.

on-this-day.com

In memory of 1/22 ~ Stories That Show What Abortion Was Like Before Roe v. Wade -a reminder, a repost


23029258922_d3dfe48bbd_z

In this era of trump …

January 19, 2016 by 

As the anniversary of Roe v. Wade approaches on Jan. 22—and with the Supreme Court set to revisit women’s fundamental right to access abortion in the Whole Woman’s Health v. Cole case, the most serious threat to abortion since 1992—the Ms. Blog decided to look back at the realities of illegal abortion pre-Roe, and for women today who lack access to proper care.

As part of our #WeWontGoBack campaign, Ms. Blog readers are sharing their own stories, or the stories of friends and family members who have resorted to illegal abortions because they had no choice. Use the hashtag to share your story on social media.

Below, read pre-Roe abortion stories collected from the Ms. Facebook page.

“In 9th grade a good friend became pregnant by our AAU coach. He threatened to kill her if she told how she became pregnant. Her parents were divorced and her mother had committed suicide a few weeks prior. She borrowed money from everyone and wrote a check on [her] dad’s account to go to [the] local abortionist. She died in [the] girls bathroom a week later. … She was a very talented artist and composed music. I had known her since third grade and even now, at 62, can hear her laughter and have a caricature of myself she drew. She had to be buried in a different cementary as was Catholic raised, as did her mom. After her death a group told the coach to quit or we would tell. We were 14-year-old kids doing the best we could for our friend. … She was just a baby herself.” — Evelyn H.

“When I was in a Midwest high school, we pooled our babysitting money to help our 16-year-old friend fly to Mexico, alone, for an abortion. Her parents thought she was staying at a friend’s home overnight. Imagine. I am 64. Never again—not going back.” — Bonnie B.

“My mom had one in Tijuana in the late 1960s. She told me she remembers watching the doctor use fire to sterilize the tools. She was OK, but terrified. She had given up a child for adoption a few years prior and couldn’t face that loss again. … I need to get the full story from her soon. I was afraid to ask for more details. It seemed like something she had kept hidden for so long. She only shared this with me when I was in my late 20s. Abortion must remain a safe and legal option.” — Jena G.

“I had a roommate in Madison, Wisconsin who became pregnant and, because in 1969 you couldn’t get an abortion in Wisconsin, the four roommates chipped in to buy her a plane ticket to NYC to have the abortion. She came home in fine shape but it was traumatic for her not to have a regional option and not having the funds as a college student to pay for it. So when I read about the closing of Planned Parenthood clinics so that underserved women don’t have regional options even for breast exams or Pap smears it is infuriating!” — Susan A.K.

My submission is very short. It is about my Mother, b. 1924, d. 1971.

She was found in a pool of blood on her cold white tile bathroom floor. Her mother found her. She was discovered, [she] did not die. Later, she had my sister and me. After her suicide at age 46, her mother told [me] about finding her daughter unconscious in a pool of blood.” — Carol F.

“In 1932 at the height of the Great Depression, my grandmother had one little boy and was five months pregnant with her second child. She was a lifelong, devout Catholic. My grandfather just came home to their tiny-two room apartment and informed her that he was leaving her for another woman. She had no job and was about to be evicted from her apartment. She was desperate, terrified and alone. A week after my grandfather left, she found a back-alley abortionist who performed [the] abortion and she very nearly bled to death. … [Then] she returned home and delivered a ‘stillborn’ (or so her parents thought) baby boy. She developed peritonitis and lapsed into a weeklong coma. When she regained consciousness and realized what she had done, she cried non-stop for two months. I was the only person she ever told; she told me that her grief and sorrow was so intense that she feared dying as she was terrified of having to face the child she aborted. She lived to be 102 and never once allowed herself forgiveness.” — Patricia H.

“My mom spoke of aunts and other beloved female family members who could not afford and/or could not handle another pregnancy and child. All that was available to them was ‘kitchen table’ abortions done in secret with a coat hanger. The pregnancy was aborted, but these women died horrible deaths from peritonitis due to internal punctures and infections. They felt as though they had no choice and were desperate not to have more children. My mom was haunted by their stories and the fact they felt so trapped. It was such a loss for her and the family to lose these lively, strong women. This was in the 1930s and ’40s.” — Jayne B.

“I’m a 62-year-old man but I know that my single mother had an illegal abortion in her teens, before I was born, that almost killed her. She couldn’t stop bleeding and couldn’t go to the hospital without facing criminal charges. All she could do was wait it out in a hotel room. Apparently, her boyfriend collected newspapers for her to sit on to collect the blood.” — Wm P.

Photo via Flickr user Kool Cats Photography licensed under Creative Commons 2.0

In the Library ~~ Before Roe V Wade , by Linda Greenhouse&Reva Siegel


lindagreenhouse&revasiegel

Before Roe v. Wade: Voices that Shaped the Abortion Debate Before the Supreme Court’s Ruling (2d edition, 2012)

The Supreme Court’s 1973 decision in Roe v. Wade legalized abortion–but the debate was far from over, continuing to be a political battleground to this day. Bringing to light key voices that illuminate the case and its historical context, Before Roe v. Wade looks back and recaptures how the arguments for and against abortion took shape as claims about the meaning of the Constitution—and about how the nation could best honor its commitment to dignity, liberty, equality, and life.

In this ground-breaking book, Linda Greenhouse, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who covered the Supreme Court for 30 years for The New York Times, and Reva Siegel, a renowned professor at Yale Law School, collect documents illustrating cultural, political, and legal forces that helped shape the Supreme Court’s decision and the meanings it would come to have over time. A new afterword to the book explores what the history of conflict over abortion in the decade before Roe might reveal about the logic of conflict in the ensuing decades. The entanglement of the political parties in the abortion debate in the period before the Court ruled raises the possibility that Roe itself may not have engendered political polarization around abortion as is commonly supposed, but instead may have been engulfed by it.

The Hyde Amendment … a reminder~~STARTED 12/13/1971 ENDED 1/22/1973 internet


Unhappy Birthday to the Amendment That Started the War on Women

I received a like & a few comments from someone from the extreme right, well, a breitbart team member.  I have no respect for what breitbart represented.

I also have issues with FOX being considered a news program that is actually a Republican station, so any use of them as a resource is just not going to fly. When it comes to Election2012, I am definitely concerned about the folks that Ryan represents the fact that he not only follows, but also quotes Ayn Rand while quietly plotting out a plan to overturn roe V wade. The top of the ticket is an even scarier thought because Ryan like Romney along with other Republicans have planned NOT to give Americans the necessary information to make intelligent choices. Though folks are starting to tune in this – is the most important election Americans have had to participate in and Republicans are doing whatever they have to in order that left leaning folks right to vote is suppressed in election2012. I am, particularly concerned about a woman’s right to choose as Republican Governors  took it upon themselves to pass unacceptable legislation ,screamed about their religious freedoms have been violated. While women all over the World watched in horror as a panel of men who not only refused to listen to Sandra fluke, they denied Eleanor Holmes Norton a seat at the table as well. I don’t know about you but I was pissed, scared and determined not to let a group of men turn back the clock in a fight for by women who suffered from a lack of Equality in all its forms, I mean are these men serious? do they think women are too stupid to make their own health care decisions or is there another reason for the sudden need to ban birth control possibly trash roe V wade.  Maybe. I know Women’s suffrage was about a whole lot more than reproductive rights and we all must remember VAMA and the Equal pay Act are bills sitting waiting to become laws. While those in Congress, specifically republicans have decided, no business is good for their Elections there is a lot of Republican talk out there about birth control and abortion, which should scare Women. As VP Joe Biden stated in the debate, roe V wade is only as safe as the Supreme Court justices allowed to sit on the court are objective.    The Hyde amendment was a knee jerk reaction from a man or group of men who believed that had the right to invade a Woman’s personal space, life and their right to choose. Unfortunately, in the end it became a law. We all know 98% of women use birth control. I know plenty girls (women) who have had abortions at 18, some are now married , have kids doing quite well thank you… went to college have good jobs and some are in that 47% because they are single parents . As a person of colour and mom, I am more than scared to be governed by Romney/Ryan … imagine that finger wagging Gov. Brewer did ; only it will be Romney/Ryan after having eliminated all social programs warning all of us brown, black ,mixed and whites folks considered a part of that low life 47%.  So, as we gasp at most if not at all of what Conservatives are saying  we hear so-called Republican, Trump and the rest of the new Republicans the notion that the time has come for the Rich to Rule America is in full effect this very moment.

I grew up thinking America was a good place to live for everyone but given the push from the “have it all” but it’s not enough seem to be trying to buy Election2012 Votes, we must all stay the course, fight back with our votes to fight the mission to turn back the clock or change our democracy.  I have some serious doubts, especially with what I am reading on your blog – Republicans have taken a big risk and trashed 47% ,do not forget this includes Vets, teachers, firefighters police …City County and State workers have been cut, slashed and burned by the GOP.

I know the write up was negative … Though it might be a good opportunity to trade information, find out exactly why ideology rates higher than the greater good … well, at least ask.

FYI … from the Center for American Progress

Unhappy Birthday to the Amendment That Started the War on Women

… birth control become controversial?” In some ways, we can thank former Rep. Henry Hyde (R.-Ill.) for setting us on this path. The attacks on contraceptive coverage can be traced back to an amendment of his that turns 36 years old today. The Hyde Amendment…

By Jessica Arons | Monday, October 1, 2012

  • Introduction: 30 Years is Long Enough, by Jessica Arons
  • Part One: Hyde Amendment History, by Marlene Gerber Fried
  • Part Two: Dignity and Justice for Some?, by Sarah Horsley
  • Part Three: Does the Hyde Amendment Violate Human Rights?, by Patty Skuster and Jamie D. Brooks
  • Part Four: Expanding Reproductive Choice, by Susan Jenkins
  • Part Five: The Future of Hyde, by Toni M. Bond Leonard