Category Archives: ~ politics petitions pollution &pop culture

1870 – In Perth Amboy, NJ, Thomas Munday Peterson became the first black to vote in the U.S.


Thomas Peterson-Mundy of Perth Amboy, New Jersey, became the 1st African American to vote. His vote was under the authority of the 15th Amendment, a day after it was adopted.

Peterson was born in Metuchen, New Jersey. His father, also named Thomas, worked for the Mundy family. It is unclear if he was a slave of the family or not. His mother, Lucy Green, was a slave of Hugh Newell (1744-1816) of Freehold Township, New Jersey. She was manumitted at age 21 by Newell’s will.

He was a school custodian and general handyman in Perth Amboy. Active in the Republican Party, he became that the city’s first African-American to hold elected office, on the Middlesex County Commission. He was also the city’s 1st “colored” person to serve on a jury.

Peterson voted in a local election held in Perth Amboy, NJ over the town’s charter. Some citizens wanted to revise the existing charter while others wished to abandon the charter altogether in favor of a township form of government. Peterson cast his ballot in favor of revising the existing charter. This side won 230 to 63. Peterson was afterward appointed to be a member of the committee of seven that made the revisions. Historical records as to his contribution to revisions in the form of minutes, writing, or other records are still wanting.

Read more about his life & legacy at  DailyBlackHistoryFacts

Resource: blackthen.com

COVID-19 on surfaces



National Institutes of Health found that the virus can live “in aerosols for up to three hours, up to four hours on copper, up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to two to three days on plastic and stainless steel.”

More recently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) studied cruise ships, including the Diamond Princess, and found that “SARS-CoV-2 RNA was identified on a variety of surfaces in cabins of infected passengers up to 17 days after cabins were vacated on the Diamond Princess but before disinfection procedures.”

Experts agree that thorough and frequent hand washing, as well as following best practices on disinfecting and cleaning surfaces, are the best steps to prevent the spread of the virus.

Resources

CDC Preventing the Spread of Coronavirus Disease 2019 in Homes and Residential Communities
Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) COVID-19 Control and Prevention
CDC Interim Recommendations for US Households with Suspected/Confirmed Coronavirus Disease 2019
FDA on Food Safety and the Coronavirus
WebMD on Pets and the Coronavirus

https://www.cdc.gov/
CDC Coronavirus Resources

History~ the month of March


 

The History Place - This Month in History

March 1

1781 – Formal ratification of the Articles of Confederation was announced by Congress. Under the Articles, Congress was the sole governing body of the new American national government, consisting of the 13 original states. The Articles remained in effect through the Revolutionary War until 1789, when the current U.S. Constitution was adopted.

March 30

1855 – About 5,000 “Border Ruffians” from western Missouri invaded the territory of Kansas and forced the election of a pro-slavery legislature. It was the first election in Kansas.

1958 – The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater gave its initial performance.

 1981 – Newly elected President Ronald Reagan was shot in the chest while walking toward his limousine in Washington, D.C., following a speech inside a hotel. The president was then rushed into surgery to remove a 22-caliber bullet from his left lung. “I should have ducked,” Reagan joked. Three others were also hit including Reagan’s Press Secretary, James Brady, who was shot in the forehead but survived. The president soon recovered from the surgery and returned to his duties.

1909 – In Oklahoma, Seminole Indians revolted against meager pay for government jobs.

1939 – The comic book “Detective Comics #27” appeared on newstands. This comic introduced Batman.

1981 – U.S. President Ronald Reagan was shot and wounded in Washington, DC, by John W. Hinckley Jr. Two police officers and Press Secretary James Brady were also wounded.

Birthday – Vincent Van Gogh (1853-1890) was born in Groot Zundert, Holland. He was a Postimpressionist painter, generally considered the greatest Dutch painter after Rembrandt. During his short (10-year) painting career he produced over 800 oil paintings and 700 drawings, but sold only one during his lifetime. In 1987, the sale of his painting Irises brought $53.9 million, the highest price ever paid for a work of art up to that time. During his life, Van Gogh suffered from despair and bouts of mental illness, at one point cutting off part of his own left ear. He committed suicide in 1890 by gunshot.

March 31

1945 – “The Glass Menagerie” by Tennessee Williams opened on Broadway.

1776 – Abigail Adams wrote to her husband John that women were “determined to foment a rebellion” if the new Declaration of Independence failed to guarantee their rights.

 1933 – The Civilian Conservation Corps, the CCC, was founded. Unemployed men and youths were organized into quasi-military formations and worked outdoors in national parks and forests.

 1968 – President Lyndon Johnson made a surprise announcement that he would not seek re-election as a result of the Vietnam conflict.

1885 – Binney & Smith Company was founded in New York City. The company later became Crayola, LLC.

1889 – In Paris, the Eiffel Tower officially opened.

1870 – In Perth Amboy, NJ, Thomas Munday Peterson became the first black to vote in the U.S.

1902 – In Tennessee, 22 coal miners were killed by an explosion.

1904 – In India, hundreds of Tibetans were slaughtered by the British.

1908 – 250,000 coal miners in Indianapolis, IN, went on strike to await a wage adjustment.

1900 – In France, the National Assembly passed a law reducing the workday for women and children to 11 hours.

 1991 – The Soviet Republic of Georgia, birthplace of Josef Stalin, voted to declare its independence from Soviet Russia, after similar votes by Lithuania, Estonia and Latvia. Following the vote in Georgia, Russian troops were dispatched from Moscow under a state of emergency.

Birthday – Boxing champion Jack Johnson (1878-1946) was born in Galveston, Texas. He was the first African American to win the heavyweight boxing title.

(Photo and picture credits: Library of Congress and U.S. National Archives)

A reminder POST: Tell your District Attorney: Don’t enforce abortion bans. Don’t criminalize pregnancy – Sign the Petition


We are in the midst of a coordinated and well-planned attack on reproductive freedom.

Abortion bans in 16 states are threatening to jail and punish pregnant people, scrutinizing every decision a pregnant person makes about their bodies. These laws are a violation of constitutional and human rights and do not uphold the sanctity of life in the slightest.

Abortion bans put pregnant people’s lives at risk. And we know Black, women, trans and gender-nonconforming folks are particularly vulnerable. Black women are already seen as less than human, purveyors of criminality, and unable to make decisions regarding our reproductive health. This perception along with other societal and health system factors is why Black women face the highest maternal and infant mortality rates in the country–which makes them even more susceptible to criminalization for their pregnancy outcomes. It’s been happening before the bans in Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia were even passed. Right now in Mississippi, Latice Fisher, a young Black mother who was charged with 2nd-degree murder after having a still birth, is fighting for her freedom as she faces life imprisonment and separation from her children. But things could be a lot different for Latice if the District Attorney had never charged her in the first place.

Law enforcement should never be involved in a pregnancy decision. And DAs have the discretion to keep their prosecutors out of maternal health matters. In the wake of the onslaught of abortion ban laws passing, some district attorneys are already taking a stand. District Attorneys across Georgia are refusing to enforce its unconstitutional abortion ban and Salt Lake County Attorney Sim Gill has declared that he will not enforce a Utah measure banning abortions after 18 weeks. Here’s why: criminalization discourages women who want an abortion or are experiencing pregnancy loss or complications from seeking medical care for fear of arrest and punishment.

Black women die from pregnancy complications at 3 to 4 times the rate of white women. And we cannot afford to add incarceration to the list of reasons our people avoid seeking medical care. That’s why we’re calling on district attorneys across the country to use their discretion and refuse to prosecute abortion, pregnancy loss or any other pregnancy decision. With your help, as a part of our national movement to hold prosecutors accountable to their communities, we can push them to uphold real justice and let women, trans and gender non-conforming people make their own decisions for their own bodies. Will you sign the petition to push your district attorney in the right direction?

Here is the Petition:
To local prosecutors:

We are calling on you to refuse to enforce laws that criminalize women based on their pregnancy outcomes and use your discretion to decline to prosecute. We urge you to create and advocate for safer and better policies and solutions to that uphold a woman’s fundamental right to reproductive freedom.

Salt Lake County Attorney Sim Gill has stated that he will not enforce a Utah measure banning abortions after 18 weeks. We are calling on you to take on this same level of leadership, and not give in to extremist political pressure that would restrict a woman’s basic rights and bodily freedom.
As a prosecutor, you have the power and responsibility to enact policies and infrastructure that would discourage police officers from making arrests of pregnant women based on the circumstances of their births and remove the fear that an abortion, miscarriage, stillborn, or other possible variation of a pregnancy outcome could result in a prison sentence. We are calling on you to take a proactive stand and end the practice of criminalizing women based on their pregnancy outcomes.

Now is your chance to take the right step in enforcing full humane lives for women.

change.org

Until justice is real,
–Clarise, Rashad, Arisha, Scott, Erika, Kristen M., Marybeth, Marena, Leonard, Kristen P., Madison, Tamar and the rest of the Color Of Change team
References:
1. “Alabama’s anti-abortion law isn’t alone. Here are all the states pushing to restrict access.” CNN, 16 May 2019. https://act.colorofchange.org/go/135858?t=13&akid=31971%2E1174326%2EUewegf
2. “Mississippi Woman Criminally Charged for Pregnancy Outcome After Home Birth (Updated).” Rewire News, 6 February 2018. https://act.colorofchange.org/go/135859?t=15&akid=31971%2E1174326%2EUewegf
3. “District attorneys from across metro Atlanta say they won’t prosecute women for abortions.” 11 Alive, 17 May 2019. https://act.colorofchange.org/go/135860?t=17&akid=31971%2E1174326%2EUewegf
4. “Salt Lake district attorney says he won’t enforce Utah’s abortion ban.” The Hill, 15 May 2019. https://act.colorofchange.org/go/135861?t=19&akid=31971%2E1174326%2EUewegf
5. Reproductive Health. Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 26 February 2019. https://act.colorofchange.org/go/135871?t=21&akid=31971%2E1174326%2EUewegf
6. “Report: Criminalizing Pregnancy a ‘Noose Around Your Neck.’” Rewire News, 23 May 2017. https://act.colorofchange.org/go/135863?t=23&akid=31971%2E1174326%2EUewegf
7. “Women’s Incarceration: The Whole Pie 2018.” Prison Policy Initiative, 13 November 2018. https://act.colorofchange.org/go/135862?t=25&akid=31971%2E1174326%2EUewegf
8. Ibid.
9. “The History Of American Slavery: “Good Breeders.” Slate, 24 August 2015. https://act.colorofchange.org/go/135867?t=27&akid=31971%2E1174326%2EUewegf
10. ‘Father Of Gynecology,’ Who Experimented On Slaves, No Longer On Pedestal In NYC.” NPR, 17 August 2018. https://act.colorofchange.org/go/135868?t=29&akid=31971%2E1174326%2EUewegf)
11. “Forced and Coerced Sterilization: The Nightmare of Transgender and Intersex Individuals.” Impakter, 4 February 2016. https://act.colorofchange.org/go/135869?t=31&akid=31971%2E1174326%2EUewegf
12. “The Moynihan Report Is Turning 50. Its Ideas on Black Poverty Were Wrong Then and Are Wrong Now.” In These Times, 30 June 2015. http://act.colorofchange.org/go/135864?t=33&akid=31971%2E1174326%2EUewegf
13. Ibid.
14. “Black women and the fight for abortion rights: How this brochure sparked the movement for reproductive freedom.” MSNBC, 25 March 2019. https://act.colorofchange.org/go/135870?t=35&akid=31971%2E1174326%2EUewegf

Good Friday ~ US


Good Friday occurs two days before Easter Sunday in the United States. It is the day when Christians commemorate Jesus Christ’s crucifixion, which plays an important part in the Christian faith. It is not a federal holiday in the United States, although it is a state holiday in some states.

Jesus Christ
Good Friday remembers the death of Jesus Christ.
©iStockphoto.com/kelly cline

What Do People Do?

Some Christians may attend special church services or prayer vigils. Good Friday is a day of mourning and quiet prayer for many Christians. The candles are often extinguished and statues, paintings and crosses may be draped in black, purple or gray cloth. Some Catholics treat Good Friday as a day of fasting, while others observe a partial fast involving the exclusion of meat.

Some homes keep a quiet atmosphere, with little or no outside activities and limited television, radio, and computer use, in observing Good Friday. Others choose to play music such as JS Bach’s St. Matthew’s Passion. Some people bake hot cross buns, a traditional Good Friday sweet.

Good Friday is another day at work for many Americans, as it is not a national holiday. Some people may choose to take a day off work and have a long “Spring Break” weekend. In some states, employees are given a day off on Good Friday.

Public Life

Good Friday is not an official holiday in the United States. Regular services will continue according the schedule in some areas, including Toledo, Ohio, where the city’s refuse will be collected during its regular schedule. However, financial markets, as well as many businesses, public schools and universities/colleges are closed on Good Friday.

Good Friday is a state holiday in some states such as Hawaii, where city and state offices are closed and some forms of public transport (eg. buses) run on the state holiday schedule. In some areas, such as Perry County in Tennessee, Good Friday is a school holiday. Good Friday is a holiday designated by the governor as a day of fasting and prayer in Connecticut.

In accordance with state law, Indiana state employees are given a day off on Good Friday, a religious holiday. In 1999, in the case of Bridenbaugh v O’Bannon, an Indiana state employee sued the governor for giving state employees Good Friday as a day off. The US Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals ruled against the plaintiff, stating that the government could give state employees a paid day off when that day is a religious holiday, including Good Friday, but only so long as the state can provide a valid secular purpose that coincides with the obvious religious purpose of the holiday.

Background

Good Friday is the day when Christians commemorate the crucifixion and death of Jesus Christ. The Easter date depends on the ecclesiastical approximation of the March equinox.

This is an important event in Christianity, as it represents the sacrifices and suffering in Jesus’ life. The crucifixion was the culmination of a number of events in Holy Week, including: the triumphal return of Jesus to Jerusalem on Palm Sunday; the washing of the disciples’ feet by Jesus; and the Last Supper on Maundy Thursday. Some churches organize a prayer vigil on Good Friday for various causes, such as for cancer patients or for the American troops who have been sent to the middle-east.

Symbols

The crucifix, or cross, which represents the way Jesus died, is an important symbol seen on Good Friday. Some crosses bear a figure of Christ. Other symbols of Good Friday include black cloth used to cover the cross, paintings and statues in churches and some homes to signify mourning.

timeanddate.com