Category Archives: ~ politics petitions pollution &pop culture

on this day … 3/4 The 11th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was passed by the U.S. Congress.


World1634 – Samuel Cole opened the first tavern in Boston, MA.

1681 – England’s King Charles II granted a charter to William Penn for an area that later became the state of Pennsylvania.

1766 – The British Parliament repealed the Stamp Act, which had caused bitter and violent opposition in the U.S. colonies.

1778 – The Continental Congress voted to ratify the Treaty of Amity and Commerce and the Treaty of Alliance. The two treaties were the first entered into by the U.S. government.

1789 – The first Congress of the United States met in New York and declared that the U.S. Constitution was in effect.

1791 – Vermont was admitted as the 14th U.S. state. It was the first addition to the original 13 American colonies.

1794 – The 11th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was passed by the U.S. Congress. The Amendment limited the jurisdiction of the federal courts to automatically hear cases brought against a state by the citizens of another state. Later interpretations expanded this to include citizens of the state being sued, as well.

1813 – The Russians fighting against Napoleon reached Berlin. The French garrison evacuated the city without a fight.

1826 – The first railroad in the U.S. was chartered. It was the Granite Railway in Quincy, MA.

1837 – The state of Illinois granted a city charter to Chicago.

1861 – The Confederate States of America adopted the “Stars and Bars” flag.

1877 – Emile Berliner invented the microphone.

1880 – Halftone engraving was used for the first time when the “Daily Graphic” was published in New York City.

1881 – Eliza Ballou Garfield became the first mother of a U.S. President to live in the executive mansion.

1902 – The American Automobile Association was founded in Chicago.

1904 – In Korea, Russian troops retreated toward the Manchurian border as 100,000 Japanese troops advanced.

1908 – The New York board of education banned the act of whipping students in school.

1908 – France notified signatories of Algeciras that it would send troops to Chaouia, Morocco.

1914 – Doctor Fillatre successfully separated Siamese twins.

1917 – Jeanette Rankin of Montana took her seat as the first woman elected to the House of Representatives.

1925 – Calvin Coolidge took the oath of office in Washington, DC. The presidential inauguration was broadcast on radio for the first time.

1930 – Emma Fahning became the first woman bowler to bowl a perfect game in competition run by the Women’s International Bowling Congress in Buffalo, NY.

1933 – U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt gave his inauguration speech in which he said “We have nothing to fear, but fear itself.”

1933 – Labor Secretary Frances Perkins became the first woman to serve in a Presidential administrative cabinet.

1942 – “Junior Miss” starring Shirley Temple aired on CBS radio for the first time.

1942 – The Stage Door Canteen opened on West 44th Street in New York City.

1947 – France and Britain signed an alliance treaty.

1950 – Walt Disney’s “Cinderella” was released across the U.S.
Disney movies, music and books

1952 – U.S. President Harry Truman dedicated the “Courier,” the first seagoing radio broadcasting station.

1952 – Ronald Reagan and Nancy Davis were married.

1954 – In Boston, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital reported the first successful kidney transplant.

1974 – “People” magazine was available for the first time.

1975 – Queen Elizabeth knighted Charlie Chaplin.

1986 – “Today” debuted in London as England’s newest, national, daily newspaper.

1989 – Time, Inc. and Warner Communications Inc. announced a plan to merge.

1991 – Sheik Saad al-Jaber al-Sabah, the prime minister of Kuwait, returned to his country for the first time since Iraq’s invasion.

1994 – Bosnia’s Croats and Moslems signed an agreement to form a federation in a loose economic union with Croatia.

1997 – U.S. President Clinton barred federal spending on human cloning.

1998 – Microsoft repaired software that apparently allowed hackers to shut down computers in government and university offices nationwide.

1998 – The U.S. Supreme Court said that federal law banned on-the-job sexual harassment even when both parties are the same sex.

1999 – Monica Lewinsky’s book about her affair with U.S. President Clinton went on sale in the U.S.

2002 – Canada banned human embryo cloning but permitted government-funded scientists to use embryos left over from fertility treatment or abortions.

2012 – Vladimir Putin won re-election in Russia’s presidential election.

History… March 4


1634 – Samuel Cole opened the first tavern in Boston, MA.

1681 – England’s King Charles II granted a charter to William Penn for an area that later became the state of Pennsylvania.

1766 – The British Parliament repealed the Stamp Act, which had caused bitter and violent opposition in the U.S. colonies.

1778 – The Continental Congress voted to ratify the Treaty of Amity and Commerce and the Treaty of Alliance. The two treaties were the first entered into by the U.S. government.

1789 – The first Congress of the United States met in New York and declared that the U.S. Constitution was in effect.

1791 – Vermont was admitted as the 14th U.S. state. It was the first addition to the original 13 American colonies.

1794 – The 11th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was passed by the U.S. Congress. The Amendment limited the jurisdiction of the federal courts to automatically hear cases brought against a state by the citizens of another state. Later interpretations expanded this to include citizens of the state being sued, as well.

1813 – The Russians fighting against Napoleon reached Berlin. The French garrison evacuated the city without a fight.

1826 – The first railroad in the U.S. was chartered. It was the Granite Railway in Quincy, MA.

1837 – The state of Illinois granted a city charter to Chicago.

1861 – The Confederate States of America adopted the “Stars and Bars” flag.

1877 – Emile Berliner invented the microphone.

1880 – Halftone engraving was used for the first time when the “Daily Graphic” was published in New York City.

1881 – Eliza Ballou Garfield became the first mother of a U.S. President to live in the executive mansion.

1902 – The American Automobile Association was founded in Chicago.

1904 – In Korea, Russian troops retreated toward the Manchurian border as 100,000 Japanese troops advanced.

1908 – The New York board of education banned the act of whipping students in school.

1908 – France notified signatories of Algeciras that it would send troops to Chaouia, Morocco.

1914 – Dr. Gustave Le Fillatre successfully separated three-month-old Siamese twins. One of the twins died four days later.

1917 – Jeanette Rankin of Montana took her seat as the first woman elected to the House of Representatives.

1925 – Calvin Coolidge took the oath of office in Washington, DC. The presidential inauguration was broadcast on radio for the first time.

1930 – Emma Fahning became the first woman bowler to bowl a perfect game in competition run by the Women’s International Bowling Congress in Buffalo, NY.

1933 – U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt gave his inauguration speech in which he said “We have nothing to fear, but fear itself.”

1933 – Labor Secretary Frances Perkins became the first woman to serve in a Presidential administrative cabinet.

1942 – “Junior Miss” starring Shirley Temple aired on CBS radio for the first time.

1942 – The Stage Door Canteen opened on West 44th Street in New York City.

1947 – France and Britain signed an alliance treaty.

1950 – Walt Disney’s “Cinderella” was released across the U.S.
Disney movies, music and books

1952 – U.S. President Harry Truman dedicated the “Courier,” the first seagoing radio broadcasting station.

1952 – Ronald Reagan and Nancy Davis were married.

1954 – In Boston, Peter Bent Brigham Hospital reported the first successful kidney transplant.

1974 – “People” magazine was available for the first time.

1975 – Queen Elizabeth knighted Charlie Chaplin.

1986 – “Today” debuted in London as England’s newest, national, daily newspaper.

1989 – Time, Inc. and Warner Communications Inc. announced a plan to merge.

1991 – Sheik Saad al-Jaber al-Sabah, the prime minister of Kuwait, returned to his country for the first time since Iraq’s invasion.

1994 – Bosnia’s Croats and Moslems signed an agreement to form a federation in a loose economic union with Croatia.

1997 – U.S. President Clinton barred federal spending on human cloning.

1998 – Microsoft repaired software that apparently allowed hackers to shut down computers in government and university offices nationwide.

1998 – The U.S. Supreme Court said that federal law banned on-the-job sexual harassment even when both parties are the same sex.

1999 – Monica Lewinsky’s book about her affair with U.S. President Clinton went on sale in the U.S.

2002 – Canada banned human embryo cloning but permitted government-funded scientists to use embryos left over from fertility treatment or abortions.

2012 – Vladimir Putin won re-election in Russia’s presidential election.

on-this-day.com

“Only Thing We Have to Fear Is Fear Itself” – FDR’s First Inaugural Address


Image result for fdr 1932

Franklin D. Roosevelt had campaigned against Herbert Hoover in the 1932 presidential election by saying as little as possible about what he might do if elected. Through even the closest working relationships, none of the president-elect’s most intimate associates felt they knew him well, with the exception perhaps of his wife, Eleanor. The affable, witty Roosevelt used his great personal charm to keep most people at a distance. In campaign speeches, he favored a buoyant, optimistic, gently paternal tone spiced with humor. But his first inaugural address took on an unusually solemn, religious quality. And for good reason—by 1933 the depression had reached its depth. Roosevelt’s first inaugural address outlined in broad terms how he hoped to govern and reminded Americans that the nation’s “common difficulties” concerned “only material things.”

his speech made on 3/4/1933 historymatters.gmu.edu


I am certain that my fellow Americans expect that on my induction into the Presidency I will address them with a candor and a decision which the present situation of our people impel. This is preeminently the time to speak the truth, the whole truth, frankly and boldly. Nor need we shrink from honestly facing conditions in our country today. This great Nation will endure as it has endured, will revive and will prosper. So, first of all, let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself—nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance. In every dark hour of our national life a leadership of frankness and vigor has met with that understanding and support of the people themselves which is essential to victory. I am convinced that you will again give that support to leadership in these critical days.

In such a spirit on my part and on yours we face our common difficulties. They concern, thank God, only material things. Values have shrunken to fantastic levels; taxes have risen; our ability to pay has fallen; government of all kinds is faced by serious curtailment of income; the means of exchange are frozen in the currents of trade; the withered leaves of industrial enterprise lie on every side; farmers find no markets for their produce; the savings of many years in thousands of families are gone.

More important, a host of unemployed citizens face the grim problem of existence, and an equally great number toil with little return. Only a foolish optimist can deny the dark realities of the moment.

Yet our distress comes from no failure of substance. We are stricken by no plague of locusts. Compared with the perils which our forefathers conquered because they believed and were not afraid, we have still much to be thankful for. Nature still offers her bounty and human efforts have multiplied it. Plenty is at our doorstep, but a generous use of it languishes in the very sight of the supply. Primarily this is because the rulers of the exchange of mankind’s goods have failed, through their own stubbornness and their own incompetence, have admitted their failure, and abdicated. Practices of the unscrupulous money changers stand indicted in the court of public opinion, rejected by the hearts and minds of men.

True they have tried, but their efforts have been cast in the pattern of an outworn tradition. Faced by failure of credit they have proposed only the lending of more money. Stripped of the lure of profit by which to induce our people to follow their false leadership, they have resorted to exhortations, pleading tearfully for restored confidence. They know only the rules of a generation of self-seekers. They have no vision, and when there is no vision the people perish.

The money changers have fled from their high seats in the temple of our civilization. We may now restore that temple to the ancient truths. The measure of the restoration lies in the extent to which we apply social values more noble than mere monetary profit.

Happiness lies not in the mere possession of money; it lies in the joy of achievement, in the thrill of creative effort. The joy and moral stimulation of work no longer must be forgotten in the mad chase of evanescent profits. These dark days will be worth all they cost us if they teach us that our true destiny is not to be ministered unto but to minister to ourselves and to our fellow men.

Recognition of the falsity of material wealth as the standard of success goes hand in hand with the abandonment of the false belief that public office and high political position are to be valued only by the standards of pride of place and personal profit; and there must be an end to a conduct in banking and in business which too often has given to a sacred trust the likeness of callous and selfish wrongdoing. Small wonder that confidence languishes, for it thrives only on honesty, on honor, on the sacredness of obligations, on faithful protection, on unselfish performance; without them it cannot live.

Restoration calls, however, not for changes in ethics alone. This Nation asks for action, and action now.

Our greatest primary task is to put people to work. This is no unsolvable problem if we face it wisely and courageously. It can be accomplished in part by direct recruiting by the Government itself, treating the task as we would treat the emergency of a war, but at the same time, through this employment, accomplishing greatly needed projects to stimulate and reorganize the use of our natural resources.

Hand in hand with this we must frankly recognize the overbalance of population in our industrial centers and, by engaging on a national scale in a redistribution, endeavor to provide a better use of the land for those best fitted for the land. The task can be helped by definite efforts to raise the values of agricultural products and with this the power to purchase the output of our cities. It can be helped by preventing realistically the tragedy of the growing loss through foreclosure of our small homes and our farms. It can be helped by insistence that the Federal, State, and local governments act forthwith on the demand that their cost be drastically reduced. It can be helped by the unifying of relief activities which today are often scattered, uneconomical, and unequal. It can be helped by national planning for and supervision of all forms of transportation and of communications and other utilities which have a definitely public character. There are many ways in which it can be helped, but it can never be helped merely by talking about it. We must act and act quickly.

Finally, in our progress toward a resumption of work we require two safeguards against a return of the evils of the old order; there must be a strict supervision of all banking and credits and investments; there must be an end to speculation with other people’s money, and there must be provision for an adequate but sound currency.

There are the lines of attack. I shall presently urge upon a new Congress in special session detailed measures for their fulfillment, and I shall seek the immediate assistance of the several States.

Through this program of action we address ourselves to putting our own national house in order and making income balance outgo. Our international trade relations, though vastly important, are in point of time and necessity secondary to the establishment of a sound national economy. I favor as a practical policy the putting of first things first. I shall spare no effort to restore world trade by international economic readjustment, but the emergency at home cannot wait on that accomplishment.

The basic thought that guides these specific means of national recovery is not narrowly nationalistic. It is the insistence, as a first consideration, upon the interdependence of the various elements in all parts of the United States—a recognition of the old and permanently important manifestation of the American spirit of the pioneer. It is the way to recovery. It is the immediate way. It is the strongest assurance that the recovery will endure.

In the field of world policy I would dedicate this Nation to the policy of the good neighbor—the neighbor who resolutely respects himself and, because he does so, respects the rights of others—the neighbor who respects his obligations and respects the sanctity of his agreements in and with a world of neighbors.

If I read the temper of our people correctly, we now realize as we have never realized before our interdependence on each other; that we can not merely take but we must give as well; that if we are to go forward, we must move as a trained and loyal army willing to sacrifice for the good of a common discipline, because without such discipline no progress is made, no leadership becomes effective. We are, I know, ready and willing to submit our lives and property to such discipline, because it makes possible a leadership which aims at a larger good. This I propose to offer, pledging that the larger purposes will bind upon us all as a sacred obligation with a unity of duty hitherto evoked only in time of armed strife.

With this pledge taken, I assume unhesitatingly the leadership of this great army of our people dedicated to a disciplined attack upon our common problems.

Action in this image and to this end is feasible under the form of government which we have inherited from our ancestors. Our Constitution is so simple and practical that it is possible always to meet extraordinary needs by changes in emphasis and arrangement without loss of essential form. That is why our constitutional system has proved itself the most superbly enduring political mechanism the modern world has produced. It has met every stress of vast expansion of territory, of foreign wars, of bitter internal strife, of world relations.

It is to be hoped that the normal balance of executive and legislative authority may be wholly adequate to meet the unprecedented task before us. But it may be that an unprecedented demand and need for undelayed action may call for temporary departure from that normal balance of public procedure.

I am prepared under my constitutional duty to recommend the measures that a stricken nation in the midst of a stricken world may require. These measures, or such other measures as the Congress may build out of its experience and wisdom, I shall seek, within my constitutional authority, to bring to speedy adoption.

But in the event that the Congress shall fail to take one of these two courses, and in the event that the national emergency is still critical, I shall not evade the clear course of duty that will then confront me. I shall ask the Congress for the one remaining instrument to meet the crisis—broad Executive power to wage a war against the emergency, as great as the power that would be given to me if we were in fact invaded by a foreign foe.

For the trust reposed in me I will return the courage and the devotion that befit the time. I can do no less.

We face the arduous days that lie before us in the warm courage of the national unity; with the clear consciousness of seeking old and precious moral values; with the clean satisfaction that comes from the stern performance of duty by old and young alike. We aim at the assurance of a rounded and permanent national life.

We do not distrust the future of essential democracy. The people of the United States have not failed. In their need they have registered a mandate that they want direct, vigorous action. They have asked for discipline and direction under leadership. They have made me the present instrument of their wishes. In the spirit of the gift I take it.

In this dedication of a Nation we humbly ask the blessing of God. May He protect each and every one of us. May He guide me in the days to come.

Source: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Inaugural Address, March 4, 1933, as published in Samuel Rosenman, ed., The Public Papers of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Volume Two: The Year of Crisis, 1933 (New York: Random House, 1938), 11–16.

historymatters.gmu.edu

FDA/USDA march RECALLS & UPDATES FOR PREVIOUS MONTHS ~ SAFETY ALERTS~ 2021


** El Abuelito Cheese of Paterson, NJ is recalling all Queso Fresco (Fresh, soft cheese), Quesillo (Oaxaca, string cheese), and Requeson (Ricotta) products, because it has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria monocytogenes infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

All Queso Fresco products with sell by dates through 032821; all Quesillo (Oaxaca, string cheese) products with sell by dates through 041621; and all Requeson (Ricotta) products with sell by dates through 031421 have been recalled. The products are sold as El Abuelito Cheese brand, distributed in CT, NJ, PA, NY; Rio Grande Food Products brand, distributed in VA, NC, MD; Rio Lindo distributed in NC and MD and Viejito, El Paisano, El Sabrosito, La Cima, Quesos Finos, San Carlos, and Ideal Brands.

The products were distributed through Feb 16, 2021 and were available in supermarkets, wholesale, and retails stores.

The following products being recalled were produced at Plant #34-12179 in the following form. Retailers may have repackaged the bulk Quesillo into smaller containers and sold this repackage product to consumers. This repackaged product may not bear the original labeling and product information as described below.

Quesillo
BrandProduct NameSizeContainer TypeUPC Code
El Abuelito CheeseQuesillo Abuelito12ozVacuum Pack673130200000
Quesillo Abuelito5LbsVacuum Bag Loose Bag673130500001
Quesillo Abuelito10LbsVacuum Bag Loose Bag673130600008
El ViejitoEl Viejito10LbsVacuum Bag Loose Bag718122180950
El PaisanoEl Paisano5LbsVacuum Bag799456415468
El Paisano10LbsVacuum Bag799456415482
El SabrositoEl Sabrosito10LbsVacuum Bag749390337586
La CimaLa Cima5LbsVacuum Bag072632891653
Quesos FinosQuesos Finos5LbsVacuum Bag851800004145
San CarlosSan Carlos14LbsLoose Bag814920000039
IdealIdeal5LbsVacuum Bag610563082674
Ideal10LbsVacuum Bag897930001951
Requeson/Ricotta
BrandProduct NameSizeContainer TypeUPC Code
El Abuelito Cheese, Inc.El Abuelito Requeson Ricotta12ozClam Shell Container673130300014
El Abuelito Requeson Ricotta – Promocion $3.9912oz.Clam Shell Container673130300014
El ViejitoEl Viejito Requeson/Ricotta12oz.Clam Shell Container718122180912

As of February 27, 2021, the CDC reports ten people infected with the outbreak strain of Listeria monocytogenes from four states.

El Abuelito has ceased the production and distribution of the product as FDA and El Abuelito continue their investigation as to what caused the problem.

As part of this outbreak investigation, the Connecticut Department of Public Health collected product samples of El Abuelito-brand Hispanic-style fresh and soft cheeses from a store where a sick person bought cheeses. On 2/19/2021, Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) analysis conducted by the Connecticut State Laboratory determined that the Listeria monocytogenes found in the samples is a match to the outbreak strain.

Consumers who have purchased the stated Queso Fresco, Quesillo (Oaxaca, string cheese), and Requeson (Ricotta) products are urged not to consume and to return product to the place of purchase for a full refund. FDA recommends that anyone who purchased or received any El Abuelito brand Quesillo, Requeson, or recalled Queso Fresco cheeses use extra vigilance in cleaning and sanitizing any surfaces and containers that may have come in contact with these products to reduce the risk of cross-contamination. Listeria can survive in refrigerated temperatures and can easily spread to other foods and surfaces. Consumers with questions may contact El Abuelito Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. EST at (973) 345-3503.

RETAIL DISTRIBUTION FOR El ABUELITO BRAND QUESO FRESCO, REQUESON, AND QUESILLO PRODUCTS

** J&J Distributing of St. Paul, MN, is recalling multiple products because they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The recalled products follow:

Brand / RetailerDESCRIPTIONUPCCode Date
HaugTaco Tray 16 oz6-10014-16383-93-Mar
HaugMini 7 Layer Dip Tray 22 oz6-10014-16414-03-Mar
HaugTaco Tray 16 oz6-10014-16415-73-Mar
HaugTaco Tray 29 oz6-10014-16416-43-Mar
Fresh ThymeTaco Dip 10oz8-41330-123683-Mar
TastebudsLayered Fiesta Taco Dip 9 oz0-38232-31611-83-Mar
TastebudsTaco Platter 26 oz0-38232-31683-53-Mar
TastebudsTaco Platter 15.8 oz0-38232-33235-43-Mar
TastebudsTaco Dip 9 oz0-38232-31612-53-Mar
EarthgrownMini Taco Dip6-10014-22341-03-Mar
CaribouTurkey Sandwich 9 oz7-98493-17447-526-Feb
Kwik TripTaco Dip 8oz0-38232-36091-33-Mar
Kwik TripTaco Dip 15.8oz0-38232-36090-63-Mar

The recalled products were distributed nationwide in retail stores.

No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with this problem.

The potential for contamination was noted after routine testing by the company revealed the presence of Listeria monocytogenes in a utensil used to produce the products.

Consumers who have purchased any of the affected products are urged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact the company at 651-221-0560, Monday through Friday, 7 am to 5 pm.

** Milky Way International Trading Corp., doing business as MW Polar, a Norwalk, Calif., firm, is recalling approximately 297,715 pounds of ready-to-eat canned corned beef products that were imported and distributed in the United States without the benefit of FSIS import re-inspection, the U.S. Department of…

IMPACTED PRODUCTS

OX & PALM CORNED BEEF ORIGINAL CHUNKY STYLEOX & PALM SITA CAMP PIE LUNCHEON LOAFOX & PALM CORNED BEEF WITH JUICES – ONIONOX & PALM CORNED BEEF WITH JUICES – CHILI & GARLIC

** Update- You are subscribed to FSIS Recall Cases: Retail Lists for the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service. Updated information is now available. The lists of retail consignees have been updated for recalls:

Vitakraft Sun Seed Inc. of Weston, OH, is voluntarily recalling one lot of Vitakraft Vita Smart Hedgehog Food because it has the potential to be contaminated with SalmonellaSalmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Vitakraft Sun Seed was notified on February 19, 2021, by the Michigan Department of Agriculture that Salmonella was detected in an inspection sample of product from Lot Number 343422. The tests which discovered the bacteria were part of random testing performed by the State of Michigan on consumer products, and not prompted by any consumer concerns. To date there have been no reports of illness.

Products matching the specific lot number below are being recalled:

UPC #DESCRIPTIONLOTEXP
0-51233-34792-9Vitakraft Vita Smart Hedgehog Food, 25oz34342211/06/22

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Retailers and distributors who received the recalled lots have been contacted and asked to pull these lots from their inventory and shelves. Consumers who have purchased a product from the recalled lot should discontinue use of the product and may return the unused portion to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Customers who have further questions are welcome to contact Customer Service at 1-800-221-6175 Extension 123, Monday through Friday between 8:30am and 5:00pm EST.

** The FDA has identified this as a Class I recall, the most serious type of recall. Use of these devices may cause serious injuries or death.

Recalled Product

  • HVAD Pump Implant Kits for the HeartWare HVAD System
  • Lots:
    • 8721869-001-01
    • 8722375-001-01
    • 8722375-002-02
  • Model: Medtronic HVAD Pump Implant Kits, labeled as:
    • PUMP 1103
    • PUMP 1104
    • PUMP 1104JP
  • Distribution Dates: October 23, 2017 to April 30, 2020
  • Devices Recalled in the U.S.: 157
  • Date Initiated by Firm: November 19, 2020

Device Use

The HeartWare Ventricular Assist Device (HVAD) Pump Implant Kit is part of the HeartWare HVAD System, which is used to help the heart continue to pump blood to the rest of the body. The HVAD system is used as a bridge to cardiac transplants in patients who are at risk of death from end-stage left ventricular heart failure, for heart tissue recovery, or as destination therapy (DT) in patients where new transplants are not planned.

Contact Information

Customers who need additional information about this recall can contact Medtronic Mechanical Circulatory Support Customer Service by phone at 877-367-4823 or mail:

Medtronic Inc
710 Medtronic Pkwy Mailstop Ls245
Minneapolis MN 55432-5603

** The Quaker Oats Company, a subsidiary of PepsiCo, Inc., today issued a voluntary recall for 3.03 oz. bags of Quaker Rice Crisps Sweet Barbecue Flavor because they may contain undeclared soy ingredients

People who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to soy run the risk of a serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume the product contained inside the recalled bags. If you have purchased the impacted product, we advise you not to consume the product and urge you to dispose it. A total of 4,550 bags are being recalled with a specific best before date of May 29, 2021.

The products covered by this recall may have been distributed to retail stores in the following states: Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, Nevada, North Carolina, Oregon, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, and Washington. 

No other Quaker products or Rice Crisps bag sizes or flavors are impacted by this recall.

At this time, there are no reports of illness. Quaker has informed the FDA of the action.

Consumers with the product noted below can return the product to a retailer for a refund or contact Quaker Consumer Relations at 1-800-367-6287 (8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. EST, Monday-Friday).

The specific recalled product information is listed below:

Product DescriptionSizeUPCBest Before
Quaker Rice Crisps Sweet Barbecue Flavor3.03 oz. Bags0 30000 31984 0MAY29213M21

Representative Product:

See Images Below

About The Quaker Oats Company

The Quaker Oats Company, headquartered in Chicago, is a unit of PepsiCo, Inc., one of the world’s largest consumer packaged goods companies. For more than 140 years, Quaker’s brands have served as symbols of quality, great taste and nutrition. Quaker® Oats, Quaker® Rice Cakes and Quaker Chewy® Granola Bars are consumer favorites. For more information, please visit www.QuakerOats.comExternal Link Disclaimer,External Link Disclaimer http://www.facebook.com/QuakerExternal Link Disclaimer or follow us on TwitterExternal Link Disclaimer and Instagram @QuakerExternal Link Disclaimer.

About PepsiCo

PepsiCo products are enjoyed by consumers more than one billion times a day in more than 200 countries and territories around the world. PepsiCo generated more than $67 billion in net revenue in 2019, driven by a complementary food and beverage portfolio that includes Frito-Lay, Gatorade, PepsiCola, Quaker, and Tropicana. PepsiCo’s product portfolio includes a wide range of enjoyable foods and beverages, including 23 brands that generate more than $1 billion each in estimated annual retail sales. Guiding PepsiCo is our vision to Be the Global Leader in Convenient Foods and Beverages by Winning with Purpose. “Winning with Purpose” reflects our ambition to win sustainably in the marketplace and embed purpose into all aspects of the business. For more information, visit www.pepsico.comExternal Link Disclaimer.

1933 – Labor Secretary Frances Perkins became the first woman to serve in a Presidential administrative cabinet


Portrait of Frances Perkins in her office, standing at her desk

Caption: above:
Perkins, Frances. Harris & Ewing, photographer
[between 1905 and 1945]
Prints & Photographs Division
Library of Congress

Frances Perkins became the 1st woman appointed to a presidential Cabinet when she was sworn in as Secretary of Labor on March 4, 1933.

Frances Perkins was born in Boston in 1880 and graduated from Mount Holyoke College in 1902. She received her Master’s in Political Science from Columbia University in 1910 and after graduation, she became head of the New York Consumers League in 1910. It was during her tenure at the Consumers League that she witnessed the horrible Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire which left a lasting impression.

In 1919, Governor Al Smith added her to the Industrial Commission of the State of New York and, in 1929 when Franklin Roosevelt was elected governor, he appointed her Commissioner of the New York State Department of Labor.External Link

loc.gov