the Senate ~~ CONGRESS ~~ the House


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The Senate stands adjourned until 2:00pm on Monday, February 8, 2016.

Following any leader remarks, the Senate will be in a period of morning business until 5:00pm with senators permitted to speak therein for up to 10 minutes each.

At 5:00pm, the Senate will proceed to Executive Session to consider the nomination of Executive Calendar #360, Rebecca Ebinger, to be US District Judge for the Northern District of Iowa. There will be 30 minutes for debate followed by a roll call vote on confirmation of the nomination.

Monday at 5:30pm – 1 roll call vote

  1. Confirmation of Executive Calendar #360, Rebecca Ebinger, to be US District Judge for the Northern District of Iowa.

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House Floor Activities
Legislative Day of February 04, 2016

0:00:39 A.M. The House convened, starting a new legislative day.
10:00:44 A.M. The Speaker designated the Honorable Alexander X. Mooney to act as Speaker pro tempore for today.
10:00:51 A.M. Today’s prayer was offered by the House Chaplain, Rev. Patrick J. Conroy.
10:02:13 A.M. The Speaker announced approval of the Journal. Pursuant to clause 1, rule I, the Journal stands approved.
10:02:16 A.M. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE – The Chair designated Ms. Stefanik to lead the Members in reciting the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag.
10:02:33 A.M. ONE MINUTE SPEECHES – The House proceeded with one minute speeches which by direction of the Chair, would be limited to 5 per side of the aisle.
10:12:24 A.M. The House received a message from the Clerk. Pursuant to the permission granted in Clause 2(h) of Rule II of the Rules of the U.S. House of Representatives, the Clerk notified the House that she had received the following message from the Secretary of the Senate on February 4, 2016 at 9:06 a.m.: That the Senate passed H.R. 907, with an amendment and H.R. 3033, with an amendment.
10:13:03 A.M. H.R. 766 Considered under the provisions of rule H. Res. 595. H.R. 766 — “To provide requirements for the appropriate Federal banking agencies when requesting or ordering a depository institution to terminate a specific customer account, to provide for additional requirements related to subpoenas issued under the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act of 1989, and for other purposes.”
10:13:08 A.M. H.R. 766 Resolution provides for consideration of H.R. 1675 and H.R. 766.
10:13:39 A.M. H.R. 766 House resolved itself into the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union pursuant to H. Res. 595 and Rule XVIII.
10:13:40 A.M. H.R. 766 The Speaker designated the Honorable Alexander X. Mooney to act as Chairman of the Committee.
10:13:47 A.M. H.R. 766 GENERAL DEBATE – The Committee of the Whole proceeded with one hour of general debate on H.R. 766.
11:21:54 A.M. H.R. 766 An amendment, offered by Mr. Sherman, numbered 1 printed in Part B of House Report 114-414 to clarify that bill does not prevent federal banking regulators from requesting or requiring a financial institution to terminate a relationship with a customer because (1) the customer poses a threat to national security, (2) is engaged in terrorist financing, (3) is doing business with Iran, North Korea, Syria, or another State Sponsor of Terrorism, or (4) is doing business with an entity in any of those countries.
11:22:13 A.M. H.R. 766 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 595, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Sherman amendment No. 1.
11:28:26 A.M. H.R. 766 On agreeing to the Sherman amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
11:28:56 A.M. H.R. 766 An amendment, offered by Mr. Gosar, numbered 2 printed in Part B of House Report 114-414 to require notice to banking customers if a customer account is terminated at the direction of federal banking regulators
11:29:15 A.M. H.R. 766 DEBATE – Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 595, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Gosar amendment No. 2.
11:38:17 A.M. H.R. 766 On agreeing to the Gosar amendment; Agreed to by voice vote.
11:38:26 A.M. H.R. 766 The House rose from the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union to report H.R. 766.
11:38:56 A.M. H.R. 766 The previous question was ordered pursuant to the rule.
11:39:56 A.M. H.R. 766 Ms. Castor (FL) moved to recommit with instructions to the Committee on Financial Services.
11:40:11 A.M. H.R. 766 DEBATE – The House proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Castor (FL) motion to recommit with instructions. The instructions contained in the motion seek to require the bill to be reported back to the House with an amendment to add at the end of the bill the following to ensure financial institutions must prove to federal banking regulatory agencies that in the preceding 5 years they have not been subjected to a consent order, settlement, deferred prosecution agreement, or civil or criminal penalty for unfair or deceptive acts and practices relating to the sale of a mortgage product.
11:50:11 A.M. H.R. 766 The previous question on the motion to recommit with instructions was ordered without objection.
12:08:56 P.M. H.R. 766 On motion to recommit with instructions Failed by the Yeas and Nays: 177 – 240 (Roll no. 62).
12:10:04 P.M. H.R. 766 MOMENT OF SILENCE – The House observed a moment of silence in memory of 12 Marines who lost their lives in a January 14 training accident in Hawaii.
12:17:50 P.M. H.R. 766 On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 250 – 169 (Roll no. 63).
12:17:50 P.M. H.R. 766 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
12:17:51 P.M. The House received a communication from the Honorable Bill Johnson. Mr. Johnson (OH) submitted his resignation from the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. The resignation was accepted without objection.
12:17:51 P.M. The House received a communication from the Honorable Mike Bost. Mr. Bost submitted his resignation from the Committee on Small Business. The resignation was accepted without objection.
12:17:51 P.M. The House received a communication from the Honorable Marsha Blackburn. Mrs. Blackburn submitted her resignation from the Committee on the Budget. The resignation was accepted without objection.
12:20:09 P.M. H. Res. 602 Considered as privileged matter. H. Res. 602 — “Electing certain Members to standing committees of the House of Representatives.”
12:20:31 P.M. H. Res. 602 On agreeing to the resolution Agreed to without objection.
12:20:39 P.M. H. Res. 602 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
12:20:52 P.M. H. Res. 603 Considered as privileged matter. H. Res. 603 — “Ranking Members of a certain standing committee of the House of Representatives.”
12:21:07 P.M. H. Res. 603 On agreeing to the resolution Agreed to without objection.
12:21:12 P.M. H. Res. 603 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
12:21:35 P.M. H.R. 3033 Mr. Smith (TX) asked unanimous consent that the House agree to the Senate amendment.
12:21:56 P.M. H.R. 3033 On motion that the House agree to the Senate amendment Agreed to without objection.
12:21:57 P.M. H.R. 3033 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
12:24:02 P.M. COLLOQUY ON HOUSE SCHEDULE – The Chair recognized Mr. Hoyer for the purpose of engaging the Majority Leader in a colloquy on the legislative schedule for the House during the upcoming week.
12:45:15 P.M. Mr. McCarthy asked unanimous consent That when the House adjourns on Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016, it adjourn to meet at 2 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 8, 2016 and that the order of the House of Jan. 5, 2016, regarding Morning-Hour Debate not apply on that day. Agreed to without objection.
12:45:16 P.M. ONE MINUTE SPEECHES – The House proceeded with further one minute speeches.
12:54:13 P.M. Mr. LaMalfa moved that the House do now adjourn.
12:54:22 P.M. On motion to adjourn Agreed to by voice vote.
12:54:23 P.M. The House adjourned pursuant to a previous special order. The next meeting is scheduled for 2:00 p.m. on February 8, 2016.

Happy Birthday Martin Luther King Jr.


Martin Luther King Jr. Biography

Civil Rights Activist, Minister (1929–1968)Martin Luther King Jr.

 Martin Luther King – Mini Biography (TV-14; 04:39) Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is widely considered the most influential leader of the American civil rights movement. He fought to overturn Jim Crow segregation laws and eliminate social and economic differences between blacks and whites.

Martin Luther King Jr. was born on January 15, 1929, in Atlanta, Georgia. King, both a Baptist minister and civil-rights activist, had a seismic impact on race relations in the United States, beginning in the mid-1950s. Among many efforts, King headed the SCLC. Through his activism, he played a pivotal role in ending the legal segregation of African-American citizens in the South and other areas of the nation, as well as the creation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. King received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, among several other honors. King was assassinated in April 1968, and continues to be remembered as one of the most lauded African-American leaders in history, often referenced by his 1963 speech, “I Have a Dream.”

 

Martin Luther King Jr. was a Baptist minister and social activist, who led the Civil Rights Movement in the United States from the mid-1950s until his death by assassination in 1968.

 

American History … Culture


Black History Unsung Heroes: Claudette Colvin

The human factor in history — Dred Scott and Roger B. Taney


Lonnie Bunch, museum director, historian, lecturer, and author, is proud to present A Page from Our American Story, a regular on-line series for Museum supporters. It will showcase individuals and events in the African American experience, placing these stories in the context of a larger story — our American story.

A Page From Our American Story

On March 6, 1857, in the case of Dred Scott v. John Sanford, United States Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger B. Taney ruled that African Americans were not and could not be citizens. Taney wrote that the Founders’ words in the Declaration of Independence, “all men were created equal,” were never intended to apply to blacks. Blacks could not vote, travel, or even fall in love and marry of their own free will — rights granted, according to the Declaration, by God to all. It was the culmination of ten years of court battles — Dred Scott’s fight to live and be recognized as a free man.

The High Court’s decision went even further, declaring laws that restricted slavery in new states or sought to keep a balance between free and slave states, such as the Missouri Compromise, were unconstitutional. In essence, Black Americans, regardless of where they lived, were believed to be nothing more than commodities.

The Taney court was dominated by pro-slavery judges from the South. Of the nine, seven judges had been appointed by pro-slavery Presidents — five, in fact, came from slave-holding families. The decision was viewed by many as a victory for the Southern “Slavocracy,” and a symbol of the power the South had over the highest court.

The dramatic ripple effect of Dred Scott — a ruling historians widely agree was one of the worst racially-based decisions ever handed down by the United States Supreme Court — reached across the states and territories. It sent shivers through the North and the free African-American community. Technically, no black was free of re-enslavement.

Free Blacks, many of whom had been in Northern states for years, once again lived in fear of being hunted down and taken back to the South in servitude. Southern slave laws allowed marshals to travel north in search of escaped slaves. The ruling was such a concern to Free Blacks, that many seriously considered leaving the United States for Canada or Liberia.

The decision played a role in propelling Abraham Lincoln — an outspoken anti-slavery voice — into the White House. The slavery issue had already created a turbulent, volatile atmosphere throughout the nation. Dred Scott, like kerosene tossed onto a simmering fire, played a significant role in igniting the Civil War. The North became ready to combat what it viewed as the South’s disproportionate influence in government.

The court case lives in infamy today, but few people know much about the actual people involved. I suspect Scott and Taney never imagined they would play such powerful roles in our great American story.

Taney was from Maryland, a slave state, but had long before emancipated his slaves and reportedly paid pensions to his older slaves, as well. As a young lawyer he called slavery a “blot on our national character.” What turned Taney into a pro-slavery advocate is not clear, but by 1857, Taney had hardened, going as far as to declare the abolitionist movement “northern aggression.”

It is reported that Dred Scott was originally named “Sam” but took the name of an older brother when that brother died at a young age. Scott was born into slavery in Virginia around 1800 (birth dates for slaves were often unrecorded), and made his way westward with his master, Peter Blow. By 1830, Scott was living in St. Louis, still a slave to Blow. He was sold to Army doctor John Emerson in 1831 and accompanied him to his various postings — including stations in Illinois and the Wisconsin Territory (what is now Minnesota).

In 1836, Scott married Harriett Robinson. Reports vary on whether she was a slave of Emerson’s prior to the marriage or Emerson purchased her from another military officer after she and Scott had fallen in love. The series of events underscored the painful and difficult lives slaves led. Love, like everything else, was subject to the vagaries of their owners’ dispositions.

Emerson died in 1843, leaving the Scott family to his wife, Irene. Three years later, Scott tried to buy his freedom, but to no avail. Scott’s only recourse was to file suit against Mrs. Emerson. He did so on April 6, 1846, and the case went to a Missouri court the following year. He would lose this case, but win on appeal in 1850. Emerson won her appeal in 1852, and shortly afterward gave the Scotts to her son, John Sanford, a legal resident of New York. Because two states were now involved, Scott’s appeal was filed in federal court in 1854 under the case name of Dred Scott v. John Sanford, the name that came before Taney in 1857.

History is filled with dramatic and strange twists of irony and fate. Those factors can be found throughout Scott’s battle for freedom. Peter Blow’s sons, childhood friends of Scott’s, paid his legal fees. Irene Emerson had remarried in 1850. Her new husband, Massachusetts Congressman Calvin Chaffee, was anti-slavery. Following Taney’s ruling, the now-Mrs. Calvin Chaffee, took possession of Dred, Harriett and their two daughters and either sold or simply returned the family to the Blows. In turn, the Blows freed the Scotts in May, 1857.

Dred Scott, a man whose name is so deeply-rooted in our history, so linked to the war that would end slavery, would die just five months later of tuberculosis. However, he died a free man.

All the best,

ACTION:Turn On The Water … it’s the right thing -reminder


Thousands of low-income Black Detroit residents have already had their water shut-off risking both public health and personal safety. What’s worse — the city plans to resume shut-offs tomorrow.
Water is a human right.ImageTell the panel: turn the water back on in DetroitTake Action

Thousands of low income Black Detroit residents have already had their water shut off, risking both public health and personal safety. What’s worse — the city plans to resume shut-offs tomorrow.1

Just weeks ago, under pressure from organizers in Detroit and thousands of supporters online, Governor Rick Snyder’s hand-picked Emergency Manager returned control of the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department (DWSD) to the duly-elected mayor.2 While a small victory for local control, the move was ultimately a political ploy to provide cover for Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr. Mayor Duggan’s “10 Point Plan” does little more than offer better customer service while continuing the inhumane and unjust practice of shutting off water.3

The solution is the Water Affordability Program (WAP) passed by the city council back in 2005. The WAP would provide relief to thousands and create a safety net that allows low income residents to pay on a sliding scale, based on their income. A 3-judge panel is holding a hearing on August 29th during which they could order the WAP back into effect and end the shutoffs once and for all.

Sign the petition: tell the panel to turn the water back on and implement the Water Affordability Program.

While Detroiters suffer under policies implemented by an unelected emergency manager, corporations are protected and speculators are circling. Individuals with as little as $33 owed have had their water shut off without warning while the Palmer Park Golf Course which owes $437,714 still has water.4 The initial round of shutoffs were a tactic to make the city’s water rights a more attractive target to potential private investors. 5

Even with authority tenuously returned to the Mayor, his plan offers little hope to residents whose rates have risen 119% in the past decade.6 Under this scheme, relief is only available after putting down a large lump sum payment and there is no promise that the emergency manager will not seize back control and change the rules yet again.

The Water Affordability Program would provide relief to all residents living under 175% of the federal poverty line and reign in the out-of-control rates DWSD has charged.7 The WAP is the best way to restore water to thousands of residents in Detroit at reasonable rates.

Turn the water back on: Sign the petition to implement the WAP.

Water is a basic human right and denying access to water poses a dire threat to public health. To make matters worse, earlier this month there were historic floods in Detroit. A state of emergency was declared. The flooding has caused millions of gallons of sewage to back up into waterways and basements. 8 How are you supposed to clean sewage from your basement when the city has shut off your water?

Sign the petition: Turn the water back on in Detroit!

Thanks and Peace,

Aimée, Rashad, Arisha, Matt, Johnny and the entire ColorOfChange.org team.

Help support our work. ColorOfChange.org is powered by YOU—your energy and dollars. We take no money from lobbyists or large corporations that don’t share our values, and our tiny staff ensures your contributions go a long way.

1. “Duggan, DWSD to release updated plan on water shutoffs Thursday; moratorium extended until Aug. 25,” Metro Times, 8/4/14,
http://act.colorofchange.org/go/3787?t=8&akid=3599.1174326.1Q65qP

2.”Detroit’s drought of democracy,” New York Times, 7/29/14,
http://act.colorofchange.org/go/3789?t=10&akid=3599.1174326.1Q65qP

3.”Orr Dumps ‘Hot Mess’ of Water Shut-offs in Duggan’s Lap,” People’s Water Board, 7/29/14
http://act.colorofchange.org/go/3790?t=12&akid=3599.1174326.1Q65qP

4. “Detroit water department now sending shut-off crews to commercial customers,” Detroit Free Press, 7/14/14
http://act.colorofchange.org/go/3798?t=14&akid=3599.1174326.1Q65qP

5.”Detroit shuts off water to thousands of broke residents,” Think Progress, 6/20/14,
http://act.colorofchange.org/go/3791?t=16&akid=3599.1174326.1Q65qP

6. See reference 3.

7. See reference 3.

8. “Snyder declares flood disaster for southeast Michigan,” Detroit Free Press, 8/20/14,
http://act.colorofchange.org/go/3792?t=18&akid=3599.1174326.1Q65qP

Buy a lady a drink ~~ Stella Artois …. water.org


Today, 750 million people around the world live without access to clean water. This crisis disproportionately affects women, who walk a combined 200 million hours a day to collect water for their families. Stella Artois is supporting Water.org to help solve the global water crisis. Learn how you can help at http://BuyALadyADrink.com

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