All posts by Nativegrl77

December Daily Holidays and Observances


  • December 1: Rosa Parks Day, World AIDS Day, Eat a Red Apple Day, National Pie Day, Giving Tuesday* (Tuesday after Thanksgiving)
  • December 2: Special Education Day, National Mutt Day
  • December 3: Make a Gift Day, National Roof Over Your Head Day, Let’s Hug Day, National Apple Pie Day
  • December 4: Santa’s List Day, National Cookie Day, Wildlife Conservation Day
  • December 5: Repeal Day, International Volunteer Day, National Communicate With Your Kids Day
  • December 6: Mitten Tree Day, National Microwave Oven Day, Coats & Toys for Kids Day* (first Saturday), National Gazpacho Day
  • December 7: National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, Letter Writing Day, International Civil Aviation Day, National Cotton Candy Day, Walt Disney Day* (first Monday)
  • December 8: Pretend to Be a Time Traveler Day, National Brownie Day, National Christmas Tree Day
  • December 9: Christmas Card Day, National Pastry Day
  • December 10: Human Rights Day, Nobel Prize Day, First Night of Hanukkah* (varies, sometimes in November), Dewey Decimal System Day, National Lager Day
  • December 11: First Day of Hanukkah* (varies, sometimes in November), National App Day
  • December 12: National Poinsettia Day, Gingerbread House Day, National Ding-a-Ling Day
  • December 13: National Violin Day, Ice Cream Day, International Children’s Day* (second Sunday), National Horse Day, World Choral Day* (second Sunday), National Cocoa Day
  • December 14: Roast Chestnuts Day
  • December 15: Bill of Rights Day, National Cupcake Day, International Tea Day
  • December 16: Boston Tea Party Day, National Chocolate Covered Anything Day
  • December 17: Wright Brothers’ First Flight Anniversary, National Maple Syrup Day
  • December 18: Bake Cookies Day, National Twin Day, National Ugly Christmas Sweater Day* (third Friday)
  • December 19: Look for an Evergreen Day, National Oatmeal Muffin Day, Holly Day
  • December 20: Go Caroling Day, Games Day, National Sangria Day, National Wreaths Across America Day* (third Saturday)
  • December 21: First Day of Winter/Winter Solstice* (date varies), Crossword Puzzle Day, Humbug Day, Look on the Bright Side Day, National Flashlight Day, National Hamburger Day, Forefathers’ Day, Don’t Make Your Bed Day* (first day of Winter), National Short Story Day* (first day of Winter)
  • December 22: National Date Nut Bread Day
  • December 23: Festivus, National Roots Day, National Pfeffernüsse Day
  • December 24: Christmas Eve, National Egg Nog Day, National Chocolate Candy Day
  • December 25: Christmas Day, National Pumpkin Pie Day
  • December 26: National Whiners Day, Boxing Day, National Candy Cane Day
  • December 27: National Fruitcake Day, Make Cut-Out Snowflakes Day
  • December 28: National Card Playing Day
  • December 29: Tick Tock Day
  • December 30: Bacon Day
  • December 31: New Year’s Eve, Make Up Your Mind Day

https://4438d5ec81a9ae3ce270cae303588429.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

on this day … 12/03


USflag1468 Lorenzo the Magnificent and his brother Giuliano succeed their father, Piero de Medici, as rulers of Florence, Italy.
1762 France cedes to Spain all lands west of the Mississippi–the territory known as Upper Louisiana.
1818 Illinois admitted into the Union as the 21st state.
1800 The French defeat an Austrian army at the Battle of Hohenlinden, near Munich.
1847 Frederick Douglass and Martin R. Delaney establish the North Star, and anti-slavery paper.
1862 Confederate raiders attack a Federal forage train on the Hardin Pike near Nashville, Tenn.
1863 Confederate General James Longstreet moves his army east and north toward Greeneville. This withdrawal marks the end of the Fall Campaign in Tennessee.
1864 Major General William Tecumseh Sherman meets with slight resistance from Confederate troops at Thomas Station on his march to the sea.
1906 The U.S. Supreme Court orders Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) leaders extradited to Idaho for trial in the Steunenberg murder case.
1915 The United States expels German attaches on spy charges.
1916 French commander Joseph Joffre is dismissed after his failure at the Somme. General Robert Nivelle is the new French commander in chief.
1918 The Allied Conference ends in London where they decide that Germany must pay for the war.
1925 The League of Nations orders Greece to pay an indemnity for the October invasion of Bulgaria.
1926 British reports claim that German soldiers are being trained in the Soviet Union.
1950 The Chinese close in on Pyongyang, Korea, and UN forces withdraw southward.
1965 The National Council of Churches asks the United States to halt the massive bombings in North Vietnam.
1977 The State Department proposes the admission of 10,000 more Vietnamese refugees to the United States.
1979 Eleven are dead and eight injured in a mad rush to see a rock band (The Who) at a concert in Cincinnati, Ohio.
1984 Toxic gas leaks from a Union Carbide plant and results in the deaths of thousands in Bhopal, India.
1989 Presidents George Bush and Mikhail Gorbachev announce the official end to the Cold War at a meeting in Malta.
1992 A test engineer for Sema Group sends the world’s first text message, using a personal computer and the Vodafone network.
1997 Representatives of 121 nations sign the Ottawa Treaty prohibiting the manufacture or deployment of antipersonnel landmines; the People’s Republic of China, the US and the USSR do not sign.
2005 First manned rocket aircraft delivery of US Mail takes place in Mojave, Cal.
2009 Suicide bombing in Mogadishu, Somalia, kills 25 people, including three ministries of the Transitional Federal Government.
Born on December 3
1755 Gilbert Stewart, portrait painter.
1826 George B. McClellan, Union general who defeated Robert E. Lee at Antietam and ran against Abraham Lincoln for president.
1833 Carlos Juan Finlay, Cuban epidemiologist.
1857 Joseph Conrad, Polish-born novelist (Heart of Darkness, Nostromo).
1922 Sven Nykvist, Swedish cinematographer.
1925 Jean-Luc Godard, French film director (Breathless).
1933 Paul Crutzen, Dutch chemist.
1934 Abimael Guzman (Presidente Gonzalo), leader of the Shining Path Maoist guerrilla insurgency in Peru.
1937 Morgan Llywelyn, American-born Irish author noted for historical fantasy and historical fiction novels, as well as historical nonfiction (1921, the War for Independence); received Exceptional Celtic Woman of the Year award (1999).
1948 Ozzy Osbourne, singer, songwriter, actor; member of the influential rock band Black Sabbath; an MTV reality show, The Osbournes, followed the lives of the singer and his family (2002-05).
1951 Rick Mears, race car driver; three-time Indycar national champion (1979, 1981, 1982).
1960 Daryl Hannah, actress (Blade Runner, Steel Magnolias).
1963 Terri Schiavo, who became the focus of a 15-year legal struggle over the question of artificially prolonging the life of a patient, Schiavo, whom doctors had diagnosed as being in a persistent vegetative state.
1973 Holly Marie Combs, actress, TV producer (Charmed; Pretty Little Liars TV series).
2005 Prince Sverre Magnus, third in line of succession to the Norwegian throne.

Frederick Douglass and Martin R. Delaney establish the North Star, and anti-slavery paper.


The North Star

Frederick Douglass (c. 1818-1895) was born into slavery at Tuckahoe, Maryland, escaped in 1838, and safely reached New Bedford, Mass. There he worked three years as a daily laborer on the wharves and in 1841 became a lecturer on slavery.

In 1845, afraid of again being placed in bondage, he fled to England. There, friends furnished Douglass with enough money to purchase his freedom and to establish himself in the publishing business.

In 1847, with Douglass and M.R. Delaney as editors, The North Star was established: “…It has long been our anxious wish to see, in this slave-holding, slave-trading, and negro-hating land, a printing-press and paper, permanently established, under the complete control and direction of the immediate victims of slavery and oppression…

FDA/USDA December RECALLS -UPDATES FOR PREVIOUS MONTHS ~ SAFETY ALERTS~ 2021


** Conagra Brands, Inc. (NYSE: CAG), is voluntarily recalling Birds Eye Broccoli Tots in 12 ounce packages with specific best buy dates due to the potential presence of small rocks and metal fragments in the product. Conagra Brands was made aware of this issue through calls from consumers.

The impacted products are identified below. Conagra Brands will work with retail customers to ensure that the recalled products are removed from store shelves.

Item DescriptionCase UPCItem UPCBatch/Lot CodeBest By Date
BE BROC TOTS 10/12Z20-0-14500-00125- 600-0-14500-00125- 24715105620AUG-19-2022 and AUG-25- 2022
BE BROC TOTS 10/12Z20-0-14500-00125- 600-0-14500-00125- 24715104220AUG-11-2022 and AUG-12- 2022
BE BROC TOTS 10/12Z20-0-14500-00125- 600-0-14500-00125- 24715113720NOV-17-2022
BE BROC TOTS 10/12Z20-0-14500-00125- 600-0-14500-00125- 24715113020NOV-10-2022

No other Birds Eye products are impacted by this issue.

Conagra has received two reports to date of injury (dental damage) associated with the recalled product. Consumers who have purchased this product are advised to dispose of it. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider. Consumers can reach Conagra Brands Consumer Care at 1-800-921-7404 from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. CST Monday through Friday, or at consumer.care@conagra.com.

** International Golden Foods, Inc (IGF) of Bensenville, IL is voluntarily recalling certain lot codes of the Al kanater brand tahini because it has the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people and others with weakened immune system. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

The product was distributed nationwide and is sold in 16 Oz. jars. The jars are labelled “Al kanater Tahini.” Lot codes are printed on the jar. Product code, description, lot code, and UPC information are noted below.

Product CodeProduct Description & SizeLot #UPC
AT1LBAl kanater Tahini Sesame Paste 1 lb. (454 gr)TT4N‐2011276‐92551‐00002‐0

No illnesses have been reported to-date in connection with the Al Kanater Brand Tahini.

This problem was revealed as a result of a random sampling by the Michigan Department of Agriculture. Although we have not received the final laboratory reports, IGF is recalling product with the lot codes listed above. Consumers who have purchased Al kanater Tahini with these lot codes should discontinue use and return it to the store of purchase for a full refund. Retailers that may have further distributed the recalled lot codes should share this notice with their customers. Retailers or consumers with questions may contact IGF at 630-860-5552. Please see attached a sample product picture. Company Contact Information: ‐630‐860‐5552, 800‐343‐7423., info@goldenfood.com,

** Press Release – Product Recall 11/24/21
Item: Golden Flax Seed Scala Bread UPC 0 7519902816 6

On 11/23 Calise & Sons Bakery, Inc. produced Italian Scala Bread (Italian bread w/Sesame Seeds) and by error were packaged in a bag that says Golden Flax Seed Scala Bread, photos below. A total of 689 packages were produced that went out to markets in RI, MA, NH and CT. The packages have a white plastic clip closure with a sell by date of 12-06 and Julian date of 327. Calise immediately contacted our sales team and distributors to begin a voluntary recall of this product. Product not yet distributed has been pulled off our trucks. Our sales reps having been returning to the stores to retrieve the product. At this moment, we have approximately 100 packages that are unaccounted for. That number will continue to decline as our route sales team reports back to us. We are working diligently to retrieve all products.

In accordance with our Recall Policy & Procedure, we are voluntarily recalling this product from our wholesale distribution pipeline and any retailers that have received this product. We ask that if you are in possession of this product to please throw it out immediately and record the number of packages discarded. Credit for the discarded packages will be issued at the time of your next delivery. Also, please notify your customers to do the same. If anyone with a known allergy to sesame seeds has consumed any of the product referenced here, we recommend that you consult with your physician immediately.

We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused. It is because of our strong commitment to Food Safety that we were able to react quickly and efficiently to recall the affected product. We appreciate your continued loyalty to the Calise brand. Thank you for your cooperation.

**

Sedition


A revolt or an incitement to revolt against established authority, usually in the form of Treason or Defamation against government.

Sedition is the crime of revolting or inciting revolt against government. However, because of the broad protection of free speech under the First Amendment, prosecutions for sedition are rare. Nevertheless, sedition remains a crime in the United States under 18 U.S.C.A. § 2384 (2000), a federal statute that punishes seditious conspiracy, and 18 U.S.C.A. § 2385 (2000), which outlaws advocating the overthrow of the federal government by force. Generally, a person may be punished for sedition only when he or she makes statements that create a Clear and Present Danger to rights that the government may lawfully protect (schenck v. united states, 249 U.S. 47, 39 S. Ct. 247, 63 L. Ed. 470 [1919]).

The crime of seditious conspiracy is committed when two or more persons in any state or U.S. territory conspire to levy war against the U.S. government. A person commits the crime of advocating the violent overthrow of the federal government when she willfully advocates or teaches the overthrow of the government by force, publishes material that advocates the overthrow of the government by force, or organizes persons to overthrow the government by force. A person found guilty of seditious conspiracy or advocating the overthrow of the government may be fined and sentenced to up to 20 years in prison. States also maintain laws that punish similar advocacy and conspiracy against the state government.

Governments have made sedition illegal since time immemorial. The precise acts that constitute sedition have varied. In the United States, Congress in the late eighteenth century believed that government should be protected from “false, scandalous and malicious” criticisms. Toward this end, Congress passed the Sedition Act of 1798, which authorized the criminal prosecution of persons who wrote or spoke falsehoods about the government, Congress, the president, or the vice president. The act was to expire with the term of President John Adams.

The Sedition Act failed miserably. Thomas Jefferson opposed the act, and after he was narrowly elected president in 1800, public opposition to the act grew. The act expired in 1801, but not before it was used by President Adams to prosecute numerous public supporters of Jefferson, his challenger in the presidential election of 1800. One writer, Matthew Lyon, a congressman from Vermont, was found guilty of seditious libel for stating, in part, that he would not be the “humble advocate” of the Adams administration when he saw “every consideration of the public welfare swallowed up in a continual grasp for power, in an unbounded thirst for ridiculous pomp, foolish adulation, and selfish avarice” (Lyon’s Case, 15 F. Cas. 1183 [D. Vermont 1798] [No. 8646]). Vermont voters reelected Lyon while he was in jail. Jefferson, after winning the election and assuming office, pardoned all persons convicted under the act.

In the 1820s and 1830s, as the movement to abolish Slavery grew in size and force in the South, Southern states began to enact seditious libel laws. Most of these laws were used to prosecute persons critical of slavery, and they were abolished after the Civil War. The federal government was no less defensive; Congress enacted seditious conspiracy laws before the Civil War aimed at persons advocating secession from the United States. These laws were the precursors to the present-day federal seditious conspiracy statutes.

In the late nineteenth century, Congress and the states began to enact new limits on speech, most notably statutes prohibiting Obscenity. At the outset of World War I, Congress passed legislation designed to suppress antiwar speech. The Espionage Act of 1917 (ch. 30, tit. 1, § 3, 40 Stat. 219), as amended by ch. 75, § 1, 40 Stat 553, put a number of pacifists into prison. Socialist leader eugene v. debs was convicted for making an antiwar speech in Canton, Ohio (Debs v. United States, 249 U.S. 211, 39 S. Ct. 252, 63 L. Ed. 566 [1919]). Charles T. Schenck and Elizabeth Baer were convicted for circulating to military recruits a leaflet that advocated opposition to the draft and suggested that the draft violated the Thirteenth Amendment’s ban on Involuntary Servitude (Schenck v. United States, 249 U.S. 47, 39 S. Ct. 247, 63 L. Ed. 470 [1919]).

The U.S. Supreme Court did little to protect the right to criticize the government until after 1927. That year, Justice louis d. brandeis wrote an influential concurring opinion in Whitney v. California, 274 U.S. 357, 47 S. Ct. 641, 71 L. Ed. 1095 (1927), that was to guide First Amendment Jurisprudence for years to come. In Whitney the High Court upheld the convictions of political activists for violation of federal anti-syndicalism laws, or laws that prohibit the teaching of crime. In his concurring opinion, Brandeis maintained that even if a person advocates violation of the law, “it is not a justification for denying free speech where the advocacy falls short of incitement and there is nothing to indicate that the advocacy would be immediately acted on.” Beginning in the 1930s, the Court became more protective of political free speech rights.

The High Court has protected the speech of racial supremacists and separatists, labor organizers, advocates of racial Integration, and opponents of the draft for the Vietnam War. However, it has refused to declare unconstitutional all sedition statutes and prosecutions. In 1940, to silence radicals and quell Nazi or communist subversion during the burgeoning Second World War, Congress enacted the Smith Act (18 U.S.C.A. §§ 2385, 2387), which outlawed sedition and seditious conspiracy. The Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the act in Dennis v. United States, 341 U.S. 494, 71 S. Ct. 857, 95 L. Ed. 1137 (1951).

Sedition prosecutions are extremely rare, but they do occur. Shortly after the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center in New York City, the federal government prosecuted Sheik Omar Abdel Rahman, a blind Egyptian cleric living in New Jersey, and nine codefendants on charges of seditious conspiracy. Rahman and the other defendants were convicted of violating the seditious conspiracy statute by engaging in an extensive plot to wage a war of Terrorism against the United States. With the exception of Rahman, they all were arrested while mixing explosives in a garage in Queens, New York, on June 24, 1993.

The defendants committed no overt acts of war, but all were found to have taken substantial steps toward carrying out a plot to levy war against the United States. The government did not have sufficient evidence that Rahman par ticipated in the actual plotting against the government or any other activities to prepare for terrorism. He was instead prosecuted for pro viding religious encouragement to his cocon spirators. Rahman argued that he only performed the function of a cleric and advised followers about the rules of Islam. He and the others were convicted, and on January 17, 1996, Rahman was sentenced to life imprisonment by Judge Michael Mukasey.

Following the September 11th Attacks of 2001, the federal government feared that terrorist networks were very real threats, and that if left unchecked, would lead to further insurrection. As a result, Congress enacted the Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act (USA PATRIOT) Act of 2001, Pub. L. No. 107-56, 115 Stat. 272. Among other things, the act increases the president’s authority to seize the property of individuals and organizations that the president determines have planned, authorized, aided, or engaged in hostilities or attacks against the United States.

The events of September 11 also led to the conviction of at least one American. In 2001, U.S. officials captured John Philip Walker Lindh, a U.S. citizen who had trained with terrorist organizations in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Lindh, who became known as the “American Taliban,” was indicted on ten counts, including conspiracy to murder U.S. nationals. In October 2002, he was sentenced to 20 years in prison.

Further readings

Cohan, John Alan. 2003. “Seditious Conspiracy, the Smith Act, and Prosecution for Religious Speech Advocating the Violent Overthrow of Government.” St. John’s Journal of Legal Commentary 17 (winter-spring).

Curtis, Michael Kent. 1995. “Critics of ‘Free Speech’ and the Uses of the Past.” Constitutional Commentary 12 (spring).——. 1995. “The Curious History of Attempts to Suppress Antislavery Speech, Press, and Petition in 1835–37.” Northwestern University Law Review 89 (spring).

Downey, Michael P. 1998. “The Jeffersonian Myth in Supreme Court Sedition Jurisprudence.” Washington University Law Quarterly 76 (summer).

Gibson, Michael T. 1986. “The Supreme Court and Freedom of Expression from 1791 to 1917.” Fordham Law Review 55 (December).

Grinstein, Joseph. 1996. “Jihad and the Constitution: The First Amendment Implications of Combating Religiously Motivated Terrorism.” Yale Law Journal 105 (March).

Levinson, Nan. 2003. Outspoken: Free Speech Stories. Berkeley: Univ. of California Press.

Weintraub, Leonard. 1987. “Crime of the Century: Use of the Mail Fraud Statute Against Authors.” Boston University Law Review 67 (May).

Cross-references

Cold WarCommunismFreedom of SpeechSocialism.West’s Encyclopedia of American Law, edition 2. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.