Tag Archives: Government

Austerity V Progressive ~~


Just another rant …

As we move into Campaign2018 voters need to remember the Global Financial Crisis of 2007 ~ 2008, how Republicans are reacting to your financial and personal status, Women’s Rights and Race in the year 2017.  We must remember the Sequester of 2013, $24Billion shutdown and ALL the NO votes against Americans in Congress. The craziness in my opinion is clearly based on conservative insanity and could shove America into another moment of chaos in the long run. if “We the People” do not open your eyes and make your vote count in midterms more than ever before because they matter … Stop ignoring our Midterm elections and fight against conservative redistricting.

I ask you, what has a Republican done for you and yours, what are they thinking and how disturbing is it that past elections have taught them nothing! They continue to vote against bills that could help their own constituents like seniors, Students and the Unemployed just to name a broad group that has to include their own families or someone they know, right.

However, Republicans seem to believe and act as if they have no middle-lower or poor constituents that will feel the pain of all those NO votes …

We may never know all the reasons or facts behind our receding economy and yes; we all have to admit some housing loans were a big mistake. We know that AIG wrapped up some products in questionable paper, put a bow on them, which blew up, and a whole lot of poo was spread through the world. I am no expert, but what part of “the global economy” did the extreme right misunderstand. Republicans have made it a mission almost impossible since they first held Americans hostage and while we still need Banksters and Wall Street to take responsibility for the out of control greed that caused our financial downfall. There is still a sense that those who played with consumer money knew the government would not only pay to get them out of the ditch but the government would be held accountable and not the banks. I am convinced this was on the minds of those willing to make bets against the housing consumer since Freddie and Fannie Mae are governmental programs. Now, in this era of trump we have a whole group of nationalists bowing and or kissing up to the wannabe

Good’ole Abe said…

 “The legitimate object of government, is to do for a community of people, whatever they need to have done, but cannot do, at all, or cannot, so well do, for themselves in their separate, and individual capacities. In all that the people can individually do as well for themselves, government ought not to interfere. The desirable things, which the individuals of a people cannot, do, or cannot well do, for themselves, fall into two classes: those, which have relation to wrongs, and those, which have not. Each of these branches off into an infinite variety of subdivisions. The first that in relation to wrongs embraces all crimes, misdemeanors, and nonperformance of contracts. The other embraces all which, in its nature, and without wrong, requires combined action, as public roads and highways, public schools, charities, pauperism, orphanage, estates of the deceased, and the machinery of government itself. From this it appears that if all men were just, there still would be some, though not so much, need for government.” ~ Abe Lincoln

The fact is; being out of a job, homeless or being on food stamps is a non-partisan reality. Yet, Republicans do not feel this way. In fact, they have yet to move on from the original stimulus bill choosing to make comments though we all saw a great number of Republicans cutting ribbons, telling their constituents they were their champions even stating President did not do his part. Honestly, the idea that Republicans state they need to be more pragmatic is laughable and as these folks continue to riff on who did what when to whom, President Obama genuinely tried to be bipartisan for the last 4yrs, but some of us feel the ultimate plan was to embarrass him … old school politics will continue to be a battle. Putting ones Party first before the People, a practice that began in 2009 has continued into President Obama’s second term with the Party of NO not only misinforming voters but also filibustering our President’s ability to govern.

The American People are hurting. yet Boehner and his group of carpet baggers seem to agree to vote for bills privately decide to vote no to anything beforehand and continue to say no to legislation which shows just what kind of person he and his party are.

It made me sad and angry given what is going on! knowing that someone could be so cynical but it shows how Republicans see politics as a game and we Americans are the pawns

While the whole thing seems amusing, I would laugh but it hurts

 ~ Nativegrl77 2013 repost

Harvard students attempt to take 1964 Louisiana Literacy test, fail


Buy a lady a drink ~~ Stella Artois …. water.org a repost


first posted in 2015

Today, 750 million people in the world live without access to clean water. Now, they say 663 million live with access to clean water and 2.4 billion  live without improved sanitation. We all have to know one without the other equals illness disease and death. This crisis disproportionately affects women, who walk a combined 200 million hours a day to collect water for their families. Stella Artois is supporting Water.org to help solve the global water crisis. Learn how you can help at http://BuyALadyADrink.com

 

Now, in the year 2017, they say 663 million live with access to clean water and 2.4 billion  live without improved sanitation. We all have to know one without the other equals illness disease and death.

~Nativegrl77

source water.org

100 thoughts on 100 days …remember this and vote for murphyforflorida.com


 

In honor of Donald Trump’s first 100 days in office, here are 100 things to remember about his presidency so far:

100.  Lying about the smaller size of his inauguration crowd
99.  Making white nationalist Steve Bannon a key part of his leadership team
98.  Threatening to pull out of the Paris agreement on climate change
97.  Sean Spicer making errant and offensive comments about the Holocaust
96.  Going back on his word to name China a currency manipulator
95.  Announcing the bombing of Syria over chocolate cake with the Chinese president
94.  Threatening to break up the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals after it ruled against him
93.  Hiring Gen. Michael Flynn as National Security Advisor amid possibly illegal entanglements with foreign governments
92.  Handling classified documents over open-air dinners at Mar-a-Lago
91.  Golfing, golfing, golfing after consistently criticizing President Obama for doing so
90.  Outsourcing key policy initiatives to his inexperienced son-in-law
89.  Directing administration officials away from using the term “climate change”
88.  Attorney General Jeff Sessions lying to the Senate about pre-election communications with Russia
87.  Likely racking up more in travel and security costs in one year than President Obama needed in 8 full years
86.  Getting Neil Gorsuch on the Supreme Court after the Senate GOP blocked Obama’s rightful nominee Merrick Garland in 2016
85.  Installing Wall Street executives and lobbyists to key posts after promising to “drain the swamp”
84.  Via Kellyanne Conway, allowing the phrase “alternative facts” to enter our discourse
83.  Declaring the free press the enemy of the American people
82.  Threatening the well-being of millions of Americans by holding healthcare subsidies hostage
81.  Introducing a budget that guts funding for PBS, scientific research, the EPA, education programs, and Planned Parenthood
80.  Still refusing to release his taxes
79.  In a Fox interview, apparently not knowing the difference between Kim Jong-il and Kim Jong-un
78.  Claiming that he only lost the popular vote because of millions of fraudulent votes cast by illegal immigrants
77.  Tweeting complaints about his daughter’s clothing line being pulled from stores
76.  Inventing fake terrorist attacks in Bowling Green, Atlanta, and “last night in Sweden”
75.  White House advisor Stephen Miller declaring that President Trump’s decisions “will not be questioned”
74.  Continually claiming that Mexico will pay for a border wall while the Mexican government continually asserts it will not
73.  Weakening President Obama’s federal lobbying ban
72.  Having one of the least diverse cabinets in recent memory
71.  Backtracking and flip-flopping on his opposition to NAFTA
70.  Backtracking and flip-flopping on his opposition to NATO (because he didn’t know “much” about it)
69.  Reversing President Obama’s practice of making the White House visitor’s log public
68.  Firing U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara after promising to keep him on
67.  Failing to divest himself of business interests that present clear conflicts of interest
66.  Introducing a tax plan that creates huge loopholes for pass-though companies, hedge funds…and likely Trump himself
65.  “Nobody knew healthcare could be so complicated.”
64.  Picking fights with longtime allies like GermanyCanada, and England
63.  Supporting tainted election results in Turkey that give more power to its autocratic leader
62.  Ordering a Navy SEAL raid that gathered no actionable intelligence
61.  Being unaware if we were sending an “armada” to North Korea
60 through 7:  Blank in recognition of Trump’s 54 of 60 unfulfilled, stalled, or broken campaign promises, per the Washington Post, many of which are on this list
6.  Leaving dozens of vital national security positions empty at the State Department
5.  Instituting an unconstitutional immigrant ban that makes our nation less safe
4.  House leaders standing by Intel Committee Chair Devin Nunes after he interfered with Congress’s investigation into Russian election meddling
3.  Trying (and failing) to fully repeal Obamacare
2.  Fabricating claims out of thin air that President Obama wiretapped Trump Tower
1.  After one of the most divisive elections in history – in which Trump lost the popular vote by almost 3 million – failing to govern as if he represents the entire country, not just those who voted for him.

Onward and upward,

Patrick

11 Words You Need to Teach Your Son Before He Turns 6


The things we say to our kids help shape their identity.

 

The following story first appeared on the Good Men Project. 

Recently, while helping in my youngest son’s art camp, I noticed one little boy falling behind the others and no longer participating.

I touched his shoulder and pointed at the teacher, as a reminder to pay attention. He ignored me and looked around the room. A few minutes later, his head was down and he wasn’t even trying.

I knelt in front of him and asked, “Why aren’t you doing the project?” He started crying.

“Everyone’s ahead. I can’t do it now. It’s too late.”

Thing was, he could have done it. They were simple steps and all laid out in front of him. He also could’ve asked for help. But he shook his head and said he couldn’t. He just couldn’t.

“Oh,” I said. “Do you feel overwhelmed?”

He looked at me funny and asked what “overwhelmed” means. When I explained that it’s a feeling you get when there’s so much happening and you just don’t know where to start, so you sort of freeze up.

His eyes lit up. “Yes!” he said, and seemed excited that someone understood exactly how he felt.

When his mom arrived to pick him up, he ran to her and said, “I was overwhelmed today, but then I got all caught up.” He shoved the craft into her hands and beamed. At that moment, it occurred to me how important it is for kids (and adults, too) to have a wide variety of words to describe feelings and situations.

As a parent, and someone who pays close attention to social issues around gender, I think it’s crucial that we make a conscious choice to arm all of our kids with words that can give them important social skills or the ability to describe feelings. This list is for parents of kids of any gender, but I am focusing a bit on what words boys need to know, so we can help them describe things we don’t typically think of as manly or boyish.

***

1. Lonely.

Loneliness often happens when you feel like nobody cares about you. As adults, we can often reason with ourselves about this feeling, but for a child it can be awfully hard to understand why people aren’t giving us what we need, emotionally, at the moment we need it.

Your kid may be resisting bedtime and say that he gets scared or sad in his room. He may actually be scared, or just sad, or he may feel very alone. Maybe you watch TV on the couch after he goes to bed, or you and your spouse sleep in the same bed without him. Being excluded from those things could be a lonely feeling for a kid.

Once you understand the nature of his feelings, you can better explain that even though he’s by himself in his bed, he’s very much loved by his family and in the morning you can all be together again.

2. Frustrated.

It’s not angry. It’s not sad. It’s something else, and young children feel this sensation regularly. Imagine having to follow every command of somebody else all the time, even when their demands feel illogical. How frustrating would it be to watch other kids get to do stuff you aren’t allowed to do, just because of your size? These are the challenges kids face every day. And it’s frustrating.

And yet most little kids don’t know that word, so when they start to feel that way, they can only define it as mad. I suspect that’s why tantrums often look like little rage-fests. So get down to eye-level with your child and describe that frustration is when you get upset because you just can’t seem to do what you want to do, and maybe you don’t even know why you can’t.

Try teaching them the word, explaining the definition, and asking them to say “I’m so frustrated!” next time. Once you understand, then you can walk him through the problem and help him solve it—or at least understand the “why”.

3. Intimidated.

I remember arriving at a park to play with a bunch of our preschool buddies with my son and he turned and said, “I want to go home.”

I’d driven thirty minutes to get there, and we weren’t going home. I asked him why, and all he’d say was, “Because.”

“Because what?”

Nothing.

Finally he said, “I’m scared.”

There was nothing to be scared of, and I told him that, not realizing that I was invalidating his feelings at that moment. He was safe, he’d played there before, and I was right next to him.

Finally he explained that he felt like his friends were all together and he didn’t know what they were playing. I realized then that he wasn’t scared, he was intimidated. He felt unprepared and unworthy. Once I understood that, I was able to solve the problem. And once he knew the word, he used it frequently in situations like that.

4. That’s just not my thing.

This is a funny one, but it’s something we’ve evolved in our family after a lot of trial and error.

Saying, “that’s just not my thing,” is a way for kids to back out of socially-pressured situations without seeming like they’re judging others or making a big deal out of something. This can be anything from, “Hey, why don’t you play basketball with us at recess like the other guys?” to something that he or she’s not ready to handle, like a roller coaster or a scary movie.

It can also be used to diffuse a dangerous or amoral situation like bullying or excessive risk-taking. Of course when kids are being cruel or harming someone (or themselves), you should empower your kid to stop or report them to a trusted grown-up, but he may also need an “out” for the situation that’s handy in a pinch so he can take a moment to figure out how to proceed next.

5. Hangry.

Things we know about kids: They act out and get more emotional when they’re hungry. But oftentimes, they don’t realize they’re hungry! They just feel mad, and will tell you that in no uncertain terms!

We joke about the word “hangry” with our kids, but it’s a useful term because hungry anger is a pretty specific feeling, and having a word for it may help your kid feel empowered to explain exactly what he or she is feeling, and remind them to stop and eat a nutritious snack like a string cheese or some almonds, that will help stabilize his or her blood sugar and mood.

6-8. Proper names for their body parts. 

Specifically: Penis, Vagina (or vulva), and anus.

I know, there’s nothing cute or fun about talking about the accurate terminology for body parts, but it’s necessary. Being able to accurately describe parts of our own bodies empowers us to speak openly and honestly about them. Using these terms without shame teaches our kids that they can come to us with questions or concerns, and this is important for their health and their emotional development.

By not using cutesy terms, we raise kids who are empowered about their own bodies. We can then discuss that their genitals are their own private business, and that nobody gets to touch them without permission. Likewise, we don’t touch other people’s genitals or make people feel uncomfortable.

Christopher Anderson, Executive Director of MaleSurvivor.org—an advocacy and support group for men and boys (and their loved ones) who have been sexually abused, explains further why accurate terminology is important:

Many child protection experts strongly urge parents to empower children with the proper terminology for all body parts. Doing so can have greatly improve a child’s understanding of their own bodies, which can in turn improve their self-image and confidence. Confident, well-educated children are also less at risk for abuse, especially sexual abuse, at the hands of perpetrators who often seek out children who are more vulnerable and less informed.

This is, of course, part of a much larger conversation, but it’s one that can help prevent your child from being abused or abusing others. This conversation has to start at age 1 and continue into their college years. For more specific instructions, see The Healthy Sex Talk, Teaching Consent Ages 1-21, which I co-authored.

I want to note that I think following your child’s lead in what they call their genitals is okay, as long as they are clear of the technical terms too. I wouldn’t stop a boy from calling his penis a “weenie” or something, as long as it was very clear he knew the word penis was accurate and totally fine to say, as well.

9. Touched-out.

This term has become synonymous with new parents who have babies climbing all over them all the time, but it’s useful in a lot of different ways, too.

Sometimes, as a parent, you just feel like you need some personal space. Maybe you’re in a bad mood, or maybe you have had a baby on you all day long. Regardless, it’s okay to lovingly tell someone—even your own child—that you’re feeling “touched out” and would like a little time where nobody is touching you. Reassure him or her that pretty soon you’ll feel like snuggling or wrestling again, but for now you need everyone to honor your “space bubble”. I always use my hands to show my kids how far around me my space bubble is, and ask them not to pop it.

Not only are you teaching them to honor others’ bodily autonomy, but if you also offer this as an option for your child, then you’re empowering him or her to say “no” to touching, even loving or innocent touch. If his little brother or sister is poking him or trying to snuggle, then he can say to you or them, “I feel touched out” and you can help advocate for his personal space.

10. Overwhelmed.

I talked about this at the beginning, but I want to underline the way I see this word helping kids, especially boys, in classroom settings.

Often, when we see a kid drifting or fidgeting in class we may default (even if only subconsciously) to assuming that the kid has an attention issue or just doesn’t care about school.

But what if there’s another issue? What if he really wants to engage but is overwhelmed because he’s behind, or because he can’t hear the teacher, has a distraction, or see the board well? I really do think this feeling-word could be of great service in young elementary school classrooms.

11. May I please…?

At the top of my list of things kids do that drive me crazy is when kids make demands. It drives me absolutely bonkers to hear a kid say, “Get me some milk” or “Give me that toy”. I know kids are naturally very selfish creatures, and being demanding is a part of development, but part of teaching your child empathy is asking them to consider how it feels to have someone demand something from them.

“Dad, may I please have a glass of milk?” or “Mom, could you please get me the Lego bin?” are questions that require your child to consider how you feel, what you’re doing, and how their request might affect you. If my arms are full of groceries, I hope my sons will see that and not tell me at that exact moment to open the door for them. But if we don’t teach them to ask people for things nicely, they may not learn to consider the feelings of the person they’re imposing upon.

And trust me, you child’s teacher will appreciate the good habit.

Becoming comfortable with asking for things with respect, as well as learning to be kind and gracious when someone says “no” are lessons that will carry forward into their lives as older kids, too, especially when they start dating.