1991 – In a “Solidarity Day” protest hundreds of thousands of union members marched in Washington, DC.


(29487) Solidarity, Solidarity Day, Washington, D.C., 1991 logo_grn

Two attendees carry solidarity signs during Solidarity Day in Washington, D.C., August 31, 1991.

(29487) Solidarity, Solidarity Day, Washington, D.C., 1991

Date:

1991-08-31

Physdesc:

Photograph

Photographer:

Anne Martens/Page One Photography

reuther.wayne.edu

1965 – The Department of Housing and Urban Development was created by the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate


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Encyclopaedia Britannica’s editors oversee subject areas in which they have extensive knowledge, whether from years of experience gained by working on that content or via study for an advanced degree….
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, executive division of the U.S. federal government responsible for carrying out government housing and community development programs. Established in 1965 under Pres. Lyndon B. Johnson, it ensures equal access to housing and community-based employment opportunities; finances new housing, public housing, and housing rehabilitation projects; insures mortgages; and carries out programs that serve the housing needs of low-income and minority families and the elderly, the disabled, and the mentally ill. It also protects consumers against fraudulent practices by land developers, ensures the safety of manufactured homes, and defends homebuyers against abusive mortgage-loan practices.for more information … britannica.com

Awareness Days in August:


  • August 1 – Clergy Sexual Abuse US and International
  • August 6 – National Fresh Breath Day
  • August 6 – National Wiggle Your Toes Day
  • August 7 – Purple Heart Day
  • August 8 – Happiness Happens Day
  • August 8 – Severe ME Awareness Day (Severe & Very Severe Myalgic Encephalomyelitis).
  • August 9 – International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples
  • August 12 – International Youth Day
  • August 13 – International Left-handers Day
  • August 19 – World Humanitarian Day
  • August 20 – National Honey Bee Day
  • August 21 – National Senior Citizens Day
  • August 30 – International Day of the Victims of Enforced Disappearances
  • August 31 – International Overdose

1962 – The Caribbean nations Tobago and Trinidad became independent within the British Commonwealth


Caribbean Elections

Most Caribbean countries remained under colonial rule after the abolition of slavery. Between 1958 and 1962 most of the British-controlled Caribbean was integrated as the new West Indies Federation in an attempt to create a single unified future independent state. The West Indies Federation fell apart when the largest island Jamaica withdrew from the federation and declared itself independent in August 1962 followed by Trinidad and Tobago in August 1962.

 

Road to Independence

Most Caribbean countries remained under colonial rule after the abolition of slavery. Between 1958 and 1962 most of the British-controlled Caribbean was integrated as the new West Indies Federation in an attempt to create a single unified future independent state.

The West Indies Federation fell apart when the largest island Jamaica withdrew from the federation and declared itself independent in August 1962 followed by Trinidad and Tobago in August 1962. By the end of the 1960s, only few Caribbean islands remained dependent territories. Barbados gained its independence in 1966; the Bahamas in 1973; Grenada in 1974; Dominica in 1978; St. Lucia and St. Vincent and the Grenadines in 1979; Antigua and Barbuda in 1981; and St. Kitts and Nevis in 1983.

Currently, Montserrat, the British Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands, and the Turks and Caicos Islands remained crown colonies with limited internal self-government. Anguilla, having broken away unilaterally from St. Kitts-Nevis in 1967, became an Associated State of Great Britain in 1976.

 

1935 – The act of exporting U.S. arms to belligerents was prohibited by an act signed by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt.


Franklin D. RooseveltIn Franklin D. Roosevelt: Foreign policy

Beginning with the Neutrality Act of 1935, Congress passed a series of laws designed to minimize American involvement with belligerent nations. Roosevelt accepted the neutrality laws but at the same time warned Americans of the danger of remaining isolated from a world increasingly menaced by the dictatorial regimes…

for more … britannica.com