In Memory -1998 – A bomb exploded at an abortion clinic in Birmingham, AL, killing an off-duty policeman and severely wounding a nurse. Eric Rudolph was charged with this bombing and three other attacks in Atlanta.


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Emily Lyons, the victim of an ‘Army of God’ bombing at a Birmingham, Ala., women’s clinic, describes her horrific experience in this interview.

On Jan. 29, a nail-packed bomb exploded outside the New Woman All Women Health Care Center in Birmingham, Ala., killing off-duty police officer Robert “Sande” Sanderson and maiming nurse Emily Lyons.

Lyons, the 42-year-old mother of two daughters, had her shins blasted away, her left eye destroyed and her right eye severely damaged. Her entire body was riddled with nails and shrapnel.

for more … splcenter.org

Eric Robert Rudolph (born September 19, 1966), also known as the Olympic Park Bomber, is an American terrorist convicted for a series of anti-abortion and anti-gay -motivated bombings across the southern United States between 1996 and 1998, which killed three people and injured 150 others.

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on this day 1/31 The 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was passed & All Natives were ordered to move into reservations.


1606 – Guy Fawkes was executed after being convicted for his role in the “Gunpowder Plot” against the English Parliament and King James I.

1747 – The first clinic specializing in the treatment of venereal diseases was opened at London Dock Hospital.

1858 – The Great Eastern, the five-funnelled steamship designed by Brunel, was launched at Millwall.

1865 – In America, General Robert E. Lee was named general-in-chief of the Confederate armies.

1865 – The 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was passed by the U.S. House of Representatives. It was ratified by the necessary number of states on December 6, 1865. The amendment abolished slavery in the United States.

1876 – All Natives were ordered to move into reservations.

1893 – The trademark “Coca-Cola” was first registered in the United States Patent Office.

1936 – The radio show “The Green Hornet” debuted.

1940 –  The first Social Security check was issued by the U.S. Government.

1944 – During World War II, U.S. forces invaded Kwajalein Atoll and other areas of the Japanese-held Marshall Islands.

1945 – Private Eddie Slovik became the only U.S. soldier since the U.S. Civil War to be executed for desertion.

1950 – U.S. President Truman announced that he had ordered development of the hydrogen bomb.

1958 – Explorer I was put into orbit around the earth. It was the first U.S. earth satellite.

1971 – Astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr., Edgar D. Mitchell and Stuart A. Roosa blasted off aboard Apollo 14 on a mission to the moon.

1971 – Telephone service between East and West Berlin was re-established after 19 years.

1982 – Sandy Duncan gave her final performance as “Peter Pan” in Los Angeles, CA. She completed 956 performances without missing a show.

1983 – The wearing of seat belts in cars became compulsory in Britain.

1985 – The final Jeep rolled off the assembly line at the AMC plant in Toledo, OH.

1996 – In Columbo, Sri Lanka, a truck was rammed into the gates of the Central Bank. The truck filled with explosives killed at least 86 and injured 1,400.

2000 – John Rocker (Atlanta Braves) was suspended from major league baseball for disparaging foreigners, homosexuals and minorities in an interview published by Sports Illustrated.

2000 – An Alaska Airlines jet crashed into the ocean off Southern California. All 88 people on board were killed.

2001 – A Scottish court in the Netherlands convicted one Libyan and acquitted a second in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, that occurred in 1988.

 

c-span : Senators propose Immigration Reform and Heritage Foundation pushes Real ID


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Senators Announce Immigration Reform Proposals

A group of eight bipartisan Senators held a news conference in the U.S. Capitol to… More »

 

 

Heritage Foundation Discusses Future of Real ID

The 2005 REAL ID Act established minimum federal standards for state-issued identification documents, such as… More »

1844 – Richard Theodore Greener became the first African American to graduate from Harvard University.


Richard Theodore Greener (30 January 1844 – 2 May 1922) was the first African-American graduate of Harvard College and dean of the Howard University School of Law.

Richard Greener was born in Philadelphia in 1844 and moved with his mother to Boston when he was about nine years old. He quit school in his mid-teens to earn money for his family, but one of his employers helped him to enroll in preparatory school at Oberlin College. He studied at Phillips Academy and graduated in 1865. After three years at Oberlin, Greener transferred to Harvard College and earned a bachelor’s degree in 1870. After teaching for two years at the Institute for Colored Youth in Philadelphia and then serving as principal at the Preparatory School for Colored Children in Washington, D.C., Greener accepted the professorship of mental and moral philosophy at the University of South Carolina in October 1873

Richard Theodore Greener graduated from Harvard College in 1870, the first African American to do so. Gifted, hardworking, and ambitious, Greener followed this achievement with a lifetime of accomplishment as an educator, scholar, lawyer, politician, and diplomat. He also contended with painful choices about how best to survive and prosper in a country that denied people of color respect and equal rights

for more … worldhistoryproject.org

image from …   backthen.com

In the library … Edgar Allen Poe


edgarallenpoe

http://www.biography.com/people/edgar-allan-poe-9443160/videos

Born January 19, 1809, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S. American short-story writer, poet, critic, and editor Edgar Allan Poe’s tales of mystery and horror initiated the modern detective story, and the atmosphere in his tales of horror is unrivaled in American fiction.

and on January 29 Raven receives accolades

His The Raven (1845) numbers among the best-known poems in national literature.

1845 – Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven” was published for the first time in the “New York Evening Mirror.”