Tag Archives: Mitt Romney

In the Library: Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies


fruit&veggiesThis book is an ethnographic witness to the everyday lives and suffering of Mexican migrants. : Migrant Farm workers in the United States (California Series in Public Anthropology)

Based on five years of research in the field (including berry-picking and traveling with migrants back and forth from Oaxaca up the West Coast), Holmes, an anthropologist and MD in the mold of Paul Farmer and Didier Fassin, uncovers how market forces, anti-immigrant sentiment, and racism undermine health and health care. Holmes’ material is visceral and powerful—for instance, he trekked with his informants illegally through the desert border into Arizona, where they were apprehended and jailed by the Border Patrol. After he was released from jail (and his companions were deported back to Mexico), Holmes interviewed Border Patrol agents, local residents, and armed vigilantes in the borderlands. He lived with indigenous Mexican families in the mountains of Oaxaca and in farm labor camps in the United States, planted and harvested corn, picked strawberries, accompanied sick workers to clinics and hospitals, participated in healing rituals, and mourned at funerals for friends. The result is a “thick description” that conveys the full measure of struggle, suffering, and resilience of these farm workers.

Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies weds the theoretical analysis of the anthropologist with the intimacy of the journalist to provide a compelling examination of structural and symbolic violence, medicalization, and the clinical gaze as they affect the experiences and perceptions of a vertical slice of indigenous Mexican migrant farm workers, farm owners, doctors, and nurses. This reflexive, embodied anthropology deepens our theoretical understanding of the ways in which socially structured suffering comes to be perceived as normal and natural in society and in health care, especially through imputations of ethnic body difference. In the vehement debates on immigration reform and health reform, this book provides the necessary stories of real people and insights into our food system and health care system for us to move forward to fair policies and solutions.

from amazon.com


urban renewal, rebuilding while displacing … gentrification! are you feelin it too


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Definition of GENTRIFICATION …

Gentrification is a general term for the arrival of wealthier people in an existing urban district, a related increase in rents and property values, and changes in the district’s character and culture. The term is often used negatively, suggesting the displacement of poor communities by rich outsiders. pbs.org

Listening to the local news, reports are that the Seattle City Council is building a New police precinct to replace the old one. ok, Then we hear the cost started out being $160Mil is now around $149Mil and would be the most expensive police precinct ever …let me change that, it would be the most expensive in the nation… yep, it is a WTF moment.

This plan seems like a betrayal to the residents of this great city.  Why can’t they rebuild on the old site least we ask why should we put up with this when there is a lack of housing, jobs and from just reading about this move … suffering from what appears to be secrets, lies and closed door meetings until that last public hearing. To say Seattleites are pissed at some of those folks we trusted and voted for is crazy … while gentrification seems to be in full effect. This news seems in conflict with what Seattle is about or used to be, not to mention the proposals for affordable housing being considered discussed possibly implemented has developers, who want to build here having to put money  into a fund that will help pay for housing or for that new “Police Precinct”?  What I want to know is if this is retroactive because common sense … how many new proposals could be in que …just saying

Oh and did you know if you want to live near great city transportation systems such as our light rail stations in the Greater Seattle area; you will be paying approximately 10 percent more? I have to admit hearing the city of Seattle admit they tell property managers that IT professionals are the best tenants was very disappointing. The comment becomes clearer if you’re looking for what used to be affordable housing here.  The yellow, orange and sometimes blue cranes stand tall, maybe 4 or more in certain parts of this beautiful city are being built to house folks of the IT variety among other big corporations that moved into downtown Seatttle; spread out, took green space away …all of which ultimately raises rents all over the greater Seattle area. Then we heard our rents are not just higher than New York City, but highest in the nation and if that wasn’t mind boggling enough try driving through Seattle to get to point B, C or D it’s not only frustrating to the lack of space between buildings … it’s a cluster f for sure.

The process of renewal and rebuilding accompanying the influx of upper-income or affluent people into deteriorating areas that often displaces poorer residents. The faces of the Pacific North West is quite concerning … Portland, Or once 33percent white in the year 2000 is now 76percent white this year of 2016. The change raises unsettling questions for a city that prides itself on tolerance, social equity and valuing diversity. It includes Seattle, WA. census documents state was 77percent white in 2014, not far behind in having developers ask demand harass older communities of colour into selling their homes lands without having a place to move to in the neighborhood let alone in the city.  I don’t know about you but gentrification is worth fighting against, but who really knew how bad it was or is? I knew that new development was pushing parts of the Pacific North West but got to say; not until after watching United Shades of America point the finger at Portland did it become clear that Portland was indeed systematically involved in a change in the faces of their state. The 64 million dollar question is how did this happen? As someone who used to go to Portland a lot, it makes me want to scream. The idea that gentrification continues to be skillfully ignored, kept outta the airwaves and or swept under some rug… probably dirty from developers, but then again Seattle and Portland need their Democratic Governor and Mayor to tell their constituents why they haven’t addressed or solved this issue.

Below is a quote from Goodread

“In the twenty-first century, the visions of J.C. Nichols and Walt Disney have come full circle and joined. “Neighborhoods” are increasingly “developments,” corporate theme parks. But corporations aren’t interested in the messy ebb and flow of humanity. They want stability and predictable rates of return. And although racial discrimination is no longer a stated policy for real estate brokers and developers, racial and social homogeneity are still firmly embedded in America’s collective idea of stability; that’s what our new landlords are thinking even if they are not saying it. (138)”

Other reads below

― Tanner Colby, Some of My Best Friends Are Black: The Strange Story of Integration in America

 

 

Photo: using my phone ~ Nativegrl77

Newt Gingrich: 15 Things You Don’t Know About Him … #vote2016


December 12, 2011
Newt Gingrich has delivered more policy statements, campaign speeches, press appearances, course teachings, newspaper op-eds, and books (24 at last count) than any of his opponents seeking the Republican presidential nomination. So you’d think all this transparency would provide a clear picture of how Gingrich would govern if he were president. But the GOP presidential hopeful is still full of surprises.

With Gingrich currently leading the pack, his GOP rivals have the knives out. Saturday night’s Republican debate in Iowa was proof-positive that defeating Obama took a back seat to derailing Gingrich. Ron Paul and Michelle Bachman accused Gingrich of being a compromised conservative. And Romney accused him of being a bomb thrower.

Related: Why Gingrich’s Budget Plan Doesn’t Add Up

In a speech last Thursday at the National Press Club, former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman called Gingrich “a product of the same Washington that participated in the excesses of our broken and polarized political system.” And in a strategy switch, Mitt Romney dispatched surrogates to criticize Gingrich’s leadership ability and commitment to conservative principles. “He’s not a reliable and trusted conservative leader,” said former Senator Jim Talent of Missouri, a Romney supporter.

Gingrich has waved away the attacks. “We’re focused on remaining positive,” he said last week during a campaign appearance in South Carolina.

Either way, with roughly three weeks to go until the Iowa caucuses, The Fiscal Times has compiled these tidbits about the longtime politician, historian, consultant and author:

1.Gingrich avoided the Vietnam War draft through deferments because he was a student and then a father. “Given everything I believe in, a large part of me thinks I should have gone over,” he said in 1985.

2.Before his election to the House in 1978, he waged two unsuccessful campaigns to unseat Georgia’s sixth-district incumbent Jack Flynt in 1974 and 1976. In 1976 he attacked Flynt’s ethics, after a newspaper pointed out that while chairman of the House Ethics Committee, Flynt had told another congressman who was facing influence peddling charges not to worry about an ethics investigation. Gingrich lost that election with 48.3 percent of the vote, but won the seat in 1978 when Flynt retired. Some 25 years later, of course, Gingrich would face his own ethics charges.

3.In 1981, Gingrich

co-sponsored a bill with Barney Frank

    (D-Mass.) to legalize medical marijuana nationally, which failed. He now calls legalizing medical marijuana a “terrible idea.”

4.Gingrich was a member of the Sierra Club, the left-leaning environmental advocacy group, from 1984 to 1990 – the years when he publicly opposed drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Later, in a 2008 book entitled

Drill Here, Drill Now, Pay Less

    , Gingrich supported opening ANWR to drilling, as well as other parts of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

5.He

broke from most House Republicans

    in 1990 by opposing a tax increase that broke

George H.W. Bush

    ’s famous “

Read my lips, no new taxes

    ,” pledge, which increased individual income tax rates from a top rate of 28 percent to 31 percent and phased out personal exemptions.

6.In 1995,Time magazine named him Man of the Year after he co-engineered the GOP’s Contract with America, saying, “Leaders make things possible. Exceptional leaders make them inevitable. Newt Gingrich belongs in the category of the exceptional.”

Newt Gingrich has delivered more policy statements, campaign speeches, press appearances, course teachings, newspaper op-eds, and books (24 at last count) than any of his opponents seeking the Republican presidential nomination. So you’d think all this transparency would provide a clear picture of how Gingrich would govern if he were president. But the GOP presidential hopeful is still full of surprises.

With Gingrich currently leading the pack, his GOP rivals have the knives out. Saturday night’s Republican debate in Iowa was proof-positive that defeating Obama took a back seat to derailing Gingrich. Ron Paul and Michelle Bachman accused Gingrich of being a compromised conservative. And Romney accused him of being a bomb thrower.

Related: Why Gingrich’s Budget Plan Doesn’t Add Up

In a speech last Thursday at the National Press Club, former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman called Gingrich “a product of the same Washington that participated in the excesses of our broken and polarized political system.” And in a strategy switch, Mitt Romney dispatched surrogates to criticize Gingrich’s leadership ability and commitment to conservative principles. “He’s not a reliable and trusted conservative leader,” said former Senator Jim Talent of Missouri, a Romney supporter.

Gingrich has waved away the attacks. “We’re focused on remaining positive,” he said last week during a campaign appearance in South Carolina.

Either way, with roughly three weeks to go until the Iowa caucuses, The Fiscal Times has compiled these tidbits about the longtime politician, historian, consultant and author:

1.Gingrich avoided the Vietnam War draft through deferments because he was a student and then a father. “Given everything I believe in, a large part of me thinks I should have gone over,” he said in 1985.

2.Before his election to the House in 1978, he waged two unsuccessful campaigns to unseat Georgia’s sixth-district incumbent Jack Flynt in 1974 and 1976. In 1976 he attacked Flynt’s ethics, after a newspaper pointed out that while chairman of the House Ethics Committee, Flynt had told another congressman who was facing influence peddling charges not to worry about an ethics investigation. Gingrich lost that election with 48.3 percent of the vote, but won the seat in 1978 when Flynt retired. Some 25 years later, of course, Gingrich would face his own ethics charges.

3.In 1981, Gingrichco-sponsored a bill with Barney Frank(D-Mass.) to legalize medical marijuana nationally, which failed. He now calls legalizing medical marijuana a “terrible idea.”

4.Gingrich was a member of the Sierra Club, the left-leaning environmental advocacy group, from 1984 to 1990 – the years when he publicly opposed drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Later, in a 2008 book entitled Drill Here, Drill Now, Pay Less, Gingrich supported opening ANWR to drilling, as well as other parts of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

5.He broke from most House Republicans in 1990 by opposing a tax increase that broke George H.W. Bush’s famous “Read my lips, no new taxes,” pledge, which increased individual income tax rates from a top rate of 28 percent to 31 percent and phased out personal exemptions.

6.In 1995,Time  magazine named him Man of the Year after he co-engineered the GOP’s Contract with America, saying, “Leaders make things possible. Exceptional leaders make them inevitable. Newt Gingrich belongs in the category of the exceptional.”


7.Two years later, in 1997, he was the first House speaker in U.S. history to be reprimanded by the House for ethics violations. The House Ethics committee ordered him to pay out $300,000 after it concluded Gingrich had repeatedly improperly used tax-exempt charitable organizations to advance his political goals, accepting $25,000 from a restaurant-advocacy group to teach ideas they favored in a college course he taught. Congress fined him both for the violations themselves, as well as to cover some of the costs of the investigation, after Gingrich admitted he “misled” congressional investigators.

8.Hesigned Grover Norquist’s anti-tax pledge in 1998 while he was House Speaker. According to Jimmy Williams, an MSNBC contributor, Gingrich was Norquist’s “Butt-buddy” when he was Speaker.

9.He said in 2005 that tenure should be abolished at state universities, calling it “an artificial social construct.”

10.Gingrich co-chaired an independent congressional study group made up of health policy experts formed in 2007 to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of action taken within the U.S.to fight Alzheimer’s. Within the Alzheimer’s community, he’s well respected, with many in the community crediting him with helping to raise awareness.

11.He has flip-flopped on whether the government should impose an individual mandate tobuy health insuranceor not. In June 2007 he said, “Personal responsibility extends to the purchase of health insurance. Citizens should not be able to cheat their neighbors by not buying health insurance, particularly when they can afford it, and expect others to pay for their care when they need it.” By spring of 2011, his tune completely changed. “I am against any effort to impose a federal mandate on anyone because it is fundamentally wrong and I believe unconstitutional,” he said.

12.In a 2008 appearance on ABC’s “This Week,” Gingrich said, “I suspect were I still in Congress … I probably would end up voting reluctantly yes,” for thebank bailout, “because I think you are given no choice.”

13.In a December 2010 Fox News appearance, Gingrich endorsed letting business owners decide when to let the Bush-era tax cuts expire. “What Republicans ought to do is say to people who create jobs, how many years doesthe tax code needto be extended for you to make an investment decision? … I would have the business leadership of the country describe the number” of years the tax cuts should remain, he said.

14.Between 1999 and 2007, Gingrich collected at least $1.5 million in consulting fees from Freddie Mac, according to a former official from the mortgage giant. His consulting group, The Gingrich Group LLC, and a health policy center he started called the Center for Health Transformation, together grossed $55 million between 2001 and 2010. According to disclosure documents, his net worth at the end of last year was at least $6.7 million.

15.What sort of First Lady might Callista Gingrich be? Last weekGingrich’s wife told Reuters that she admired Nancy Reagan, Laura Bush and Jacqueline Kennedy. Mrs. Reagan, she said, “was always protective of her husband, looking out [for] his best interest always.” Laura Bush was “a very loving mother and wife,” while Jacqueline Kennedy had “incredible style and grace. She also focused on the arts and music and that’s something I admire very much.”

An earlier version of this story incorrectly attributed the quote in No. 8 to Jared Bernstein.


Other Factoids about Newt Gingrich:

    • His full name: Newton Leroy Gingrich. He was born in June 1943 as Newton Leroy McPherson and was adopted a few years later by his mother’s second husband, Army officer Robert Gingrich. He and his family (including three younger half-sisters) moved four times in seven years. They lived in Fort Riley, Kansas; Orleans, France; Stuttgart, Germany; and Fort Benning, Georgia.• Gingrich became interested in politics as a teenager while living in Orleans, France, especially when visiting the Battle of Verdun site, where his biography says “he learned about the sacrifices made and the importance of political leadership.” He graduated from Baker H.S. in Columbus, Georgia.• He earned a bachelor’s in history from Emory University in 1965 and a master’s and doctorate in Modern European History from Tulane (in 1968 and 1971, respectively).• His Ph.D. dissertation topic: Belgian education policy in the Congo, 1945 to 1960.• Before he was elected to Congress in 1978, he taught history and environmental studies at West Georgia College for eight years.• He believes in the theory of “departure and return,” from historian Arnold J. Toynbee: It says that great leaders must be banished from their homelands before they can improve themselves and return to lead. One of his personal heroes is Charles de Gaulle, the French general who was exiled from France before returning to become one of the country’s most storied presidents.• Among his 24 books (including 13

New York Times

    bestsellers) are several alternate history novels, including

1945

    , published in 1995, in which Hitler doesn’t declare war on the U.S. first but is injured in a plane crash on December 6, 1941, while Germany is run by Goring, Goebbels, and Halder. Gingrich has also written a series of Civil War novels, including

Grant Comes East

    and

The Battle of the Crater: A Novel

    .
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ClearWaterProject: Building a movement for clean water & cultural survival


“Without clean water, we cannot survive,” Emergildo Criollo told me recently.

You may have heard of Emergildo. An indigenous leader of the Cofan Nation in Ecuador’s northern Amazon, he has been a relentless advocate for his people, speaking out about oil giant Chevron’s toxic legacy in his territory. But today, even as he continues the fight to hold Chevron accountable, Emergildo isn’t waiting for a cleanup that seems always on the horizon.

Emergildo is taking matters into his own hands, helping to bring clean water to thousands of indigenous people who have suffered without for decades. And today, I want to ask you to support Emergildo, and the other indigenous leaders who are part of an effort that Amazon Watch is deeply proud to support:

It’s called The ClearWater Project.

ClearWater

Established in late 2011 by long-time Amazon Watch campaigner Mitch Anderson, ClearWater was a response to Emergildo’s clarion call for clean water, where access to this basic necessity can be a matter of life and death.

ClearWater began with a big goal: provide safe, sustainable access to clean water for every indigenous family in the region, whose ancestral waterways have been poisoned by oil production and ensuing industrialization.

In just two years, ClearWater has installed more than 500 family-sized rainwater harvesting and filtration systems that serve thousands of people in communities who have long suffered an epidemic of cancer, birth defects, and other illnesses that numerous health studies in the region blame on a lack of access to safe sources of water for drinking, bathing, and cooking.

And our efforts have been able to make this impact because from the beginning, ClearWater has been a collaborative partnership between the five indigenous nationalities here – the Cofan, Siona, Secoya, Kichwa, and Waorani – and international supporters, such as water engineers, humanitarians, activists, philanthropists, and people like you.

ClearWater believes in collaborative, integrative, community-led solutions, where someone like Emergildo is coordinating amongst the different indigenous nationalities to install new water systems, local youth are using GPS to map their biological and cultural resources, and frontline leaders are learning new media techniques to broadcast their concerns to the world.

Clean water, health, and dignity. From this foundation, Emergildo and the indigenous people of Ecuador’s northern Amazon, are building a movement for rainforest protection and cultural survival.

I’m proud that Amazon Watch is a founding partner in this project, and I hope you’ll join us too.

In solidarity,

Han Shan
Han Shan
Amazon Watch Advisory Board Member

P.S. Explore ClearWater’s impact by navigating around this cutting-edge interactive map designed by another Amazon Watch family member, Gregor MacLennan, now Digital Democracy’s Program Director.

Vote with Your Fork, Chem Free Pesticides & Acid Ocean … it’s now 2016


Vote with Your Fork

vote with your fork

Feel that crackle?

Okay, okay. Stand still. Right here in front of me. Close your eyes. Extend your arms out. You feel that? That light crackle across your fingertips?

Change is in the air.

American agriculture is not sustainable. Our food is overloaded with pesticides, growth agents and all the trappings of modern chemical warfare. As a result, the produce we put on our plates … is lacking. We don’t taste the robust flavors in the juices bursting from our salad tomatoes. We cannot grasp the complex fullness of authentic, fresh herbs over rich potatoes for a multilayered flavor the way we would experience in less agriculturally destroyed countries.
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1st posted in 2014