I1876 Indian Removal … others say Grant Extends Indian Reservation Deadline


1876 – All Native American Indians were ordered to move into reservations.

In a move that prevented open war across the Northern Plains, President Ulysses S. Grant issued an executive order extending the deadline set previously for all Native Americans to return to their reservations. The initial date for the deadline had been carefully calculated two months before by Grant and his generals Philip Sheridan, commander of the Division of the Missouri, and George Crook, commander of the Department of the Platte, to be unreachable by the Indians, who had settled into their winter quarters. When the Indians did not move (General Sheridan noted that the Indians would not move no matter the date, though Lakota leaders had already decided they would travel to the agencies that spring), they would march troopers into the Indian camps and force them into submissive positions on the reservations.

The matter at the core was gold. White encroachment on Indian lands had gone on for decades, and the Indians had gradually migrated and dealt with the growing White settlement. Several wars had raged, but none were as large as the surprise attack Sheridan and Crook were planning to clear the Indians quickly and effectively out of the Black Hills, where gold had been discovered by the Custer Expedition in 1874. A gold rush was in full sway and expected to boom. The Federal government had ended stopping trespassers onto the Sioux hunting grounds as an initial part of the plan and offered to pay the tribes $25,000 and reservations south in Indian Territory. Spotted Tail summarized the feelings of the Sioux leaders who had traveled to Washington with, “You speak of another country, but it is not my country; it does not concern me, and I want nothing to do with it. I was not born there.”

Yet, the land was needed both to open for the glut of would-be miners following the Panic of 1873 as well as for railroad projects. Grant had previously reversed the objectives of the Federal government, which had been anti-Indian since its founding. Johnson’s order to General Sheridan years before about the Cheyenne and Arapaho had been, “I want you to go ahead, kill and punish the hostiles, capture and destroy the ponies.” Grant later confronted Congress on the policies, saying, “Wars of extermination are demoralizing and wicked” and “A system which looks to the extinction of a race is too horrible for a nation to adopt without entailing upon itself the wrath of all Christendom.” Despite his advances in upholding treaties, in his second term the question of the Black Hills had turned him to the same policies he had derided.

In late January, a telegram from the US Indian Agent at Standing Rock reached the president, saying that his requests to extend the deadline had been repeatedly denied despite that travel in the midst of winter was impossible. He noted that any God-fearing, decent man would be reasonable rather than start a war, and Grant felt his spark of conscious. The Whiskey Ring scandal that had implicated his secretary Orville E. Babcock had destroyed Grant’s popularity among Republicans, and he decided that acting in favor of the Indians could not do any more damage, saying famously, “If I’m going to be unpopular, I might as well do the right thing.”

In spring of 1876, the majority of the Indians came to their reservations as had been agreed. Sheridan and Crook were allowed to mop up the stragglers and then ordered to maintain some kind of peace amid the Indians and the swarms of prospectors centering on Deadwood. Methods of herding the remaining buffalo were organized by the Sioux and government agents, who finally were able to work a deal for the Northern Pacific Railroad giving the Indians a toll based on transport. When the gold began to give out, the prospectors deserted, and the Sioux gradually came back into control over much of the area. Conservationist Theodore Roosevelt hunted the buffalo in 1893, and his political actions back East helped give funding to rebuilding the Northern Buffalo Herd, which had been barely saved from the extinction that had struck the Southern.

Despite decades more of politics and needless violence, the White and Native Americans gradually learned to live alongside one another, perhaps best exemplified by the peaceful demonstrations at Wounded Knee in 1890 where invited government officials understood the severity of breaking up the Great Sioux Reservation and determined to honor the previous treaty.

In reality, the request for extension was firmly denied. The Great Sioux War began, leading to nearly double the casualties of American soldiers as Sioux (such as in the disastrous Battle of Little Bighorn), but firmly establishing the US Army’s control over the Indians. The buffalo were systematically eradicated, leaving the Native Americans no choice but to depend upon the Federal Agencies for supplies. Policies of assimilation continued for decades on the reservations, especially after the cultural misunderstanding of the Ghost Dance that led to the Massacre at Wounded Knee.

On 1/31 ~ The House passes the 13th Amendment


Amendments 13-15 are called the Reconstruction Amendments both because they were the first enacted right after the Civil War and because all addressed questions related to the legal and political status of the African Americans.

On 1/31 in 1865, the U.S. House of Representatives passes the 13th Amendment to the Constitution, abolishing slavery in America. The amendment read, “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude…shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.”

When the Civil War began, President Abraham Lincoln’s professed goal was the restoration of the Union. But early in the war, the Union began keeping escaped slaves rather than returning them to their owners, so slavery essentially ended wherever the Union army was victorious.

In September 1862, Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing all slaves in areas that were still in rebellion against the Union. This measure opened the issue of what to do about slavery in border states that had not seceded or in areas that had been captured by the Union before the proclamation.

In 1864, an amendment abolishing slavery passed the U.S. Senate but died in the House as Democrats rallied in the name of states’ rights. The election of 1864 brought Lincoln back to the White House along with significant Republican majorities in both houses, so it appeared the amendment was headed for passage when the new Congress convened in March 1865. Lincoln preferred that the amendment receive bipartisan support–some Democrats indicated support for the measure, but many still resisted.

The amendment passed 119 to 56, seven votes above the necessary two-thirds majority. Several Democrats abstained, but the 13th Amendment was sent to the states for ratification, which came in December 1865. With the passage of the amendment, the institution that had indelibly shaped American history was eradicated

Amendments 13-15 are called the Reconstruction Amendments both because they were the first enacted right after the Civil War and because all addressed questions related to the legal and political status of the African Americans.

blackpast.org

How employers can help working people ride out the Seattle Squeeze ~ sign the petition


Target: Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce, Downtown Seattle Association, Washington Retail Association, Washington Hospitality Association, and other area business groups 

workingwa.org

Employers in the region have a key role to play to help us all ride out the Seattle Squeeze. Public agencies and some large companies have encouraged telecommuting, altered work schedules, and other similar steps — but not everyone works in an office.

We call on the Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce, the Downtown Seattle Association, the retail lobby, and the restaurant lobby to join us in urging employers to do what it takes to offer some relief to the hundreds of thousands of people in our region who work in food service, retail, warehouses, caregiving, delivery, and other fields that require that a worker show up at a particular workplace in order to do their jobs.

What employers can do:
  • PROVIDE AT LEAST TWO WEEKS’ NOTICE OF WORK SCHEDULES. Employees will need extra time to plan their lives, accommodate caregiving needs, and adjust their commutes given the level of congestion and increased travel-time expected.
  • SET A MINIMUM SHIFT LENGTH OF AT LEAST FOUR HOURS.
    Extended commute times will make short shifts particularly hard for employees, and fewer shift changes means less trips in the region.
  • DO NOT RELY ON ON-CALL SHIFTS. Expecting employees to be prepared to come to work without notice and arrive within a short time of being called in will be practically impossible during this period.
  • ACCOMMODATE WORKERS WHO NEED TO MODIFY THEIR AVAILABILITY. Employers should go the extra mile to adjust employees’ schedules to accommodate transportation challenges, and plan more shift overlap to account for added unpredictability in travel times.
  • ESTABLISH EMPLOYEE-TO-EMPLOYEE SHIFT SWAPPING SYSTEMS. Employees should be allowed to trade shifts with co-workers (including those who work at different locations) so they can provide additional flexibility to each other.
  • WAIVE DISCIPLINE FOR EMPLOYEES WHO ARRIVE LATE TO WORK DUE TO TRANSPORTATION. Employees should not be penalized for our region’s transportation squeeze, including through the application of “points” in occurrence-based discipline systems, algorithmic management systems, and similar practices.
  • CONTRIBUTE TO EMPLOYEES’ TRANSPORTATION COSTS. Policies which make transit free to employees can greatly increase ridership, reducing traffic impacts for everyone.
  • AUDIT FOR COMPLIANCE WITH SEATTLE’S SECURE SCHEDULING ORDINANCE. Large food, coffee, and retail chains doing business within the city limits of Seattle are already obligated by law to provide advance notice, pay for on-call shifts, accommodate transportation-related scheduling needs, and more.
What gig economy companies can do:
  • ADJUST PAY ALGORITHMS TO GIVE MORE WEIGHT TO TIME SPENT ON A JOB. Short-distance trips may take far longer to complete than usual, so pay rates should reflect time spent on the job rather than distance traveled.
  • PROVIDE WORKERS THE ESTIMATED TIME INVOLVED IN A GIVEN JOB. Workers will need this information before choosing to accept or reject a job so they can avoid longer trips if they have family obligations or otherwise require flexibility.
  • DON’T PENALIZE WORKERS FOR DECLINING JOBS THAT DON’T WORK FOR THEM. Nobody should risk their livelihood because they choose not to take jobs requiring long trips during a period of maximum traffic constraint.
  • WAIVE APPLICATION OF CUSTOMER STAR RATINGS TO WORKERS’ EVALUATIONS. Some customers will express frustration with extended travel and delivery times through in-app ratings. Workers do not have control over these conditions, so these ratings should not be applied to decisions on discipline, terminate, or other evaluations.
  • ENSURE ACCESS TO COMPANY REPRESENTATIVES WHEN ASSISTANCE IS NEEDED. Workers should have a place to go to resolve the situation if there is a transportation-related problem with completing a job.

workers & forced arbitration agreements


About 60 million workers are covered by forced arbitration agreements which restrict their access to the courts and instead require labor rights claims to go to arbitration — but few people really know what arbitration looks like…  this eye-opening piece in Bloomberg .

The subject of the case may be a former Wall Street hotshot trying to collect on a $1 million bonus, but the details are nonetheless startling, and undoubtedly worth a closer look (as is the lovely illustration). Most memorable perhaps is the arbitrator who denied that he had fallen asleep but did allow that “it’s a challenge for any arbitrator to have to keep paying close attention” because “sometimes the witness is very repetitive.” But the kicker is the straightforwardness with which a corporate lawyer explains the benefits of this system: there are usually more employees than managers on juries, and “every employee hates their boss,” which affects their outlook on legal claims.

FDA/USDA~January ~2019~ Alerts & Safety


  • Monmouth Junction, NJ, Tris Pharma, Inc. is expanding the scope of its November 2018 recall by adding three (3) additional lots of Ibuprofen Oral Suspension Drops, USP, 50 mg per 1.25 mL, to the retail (pharmacy) level. Some units from these batches have been found to have higher levels of Ibuprofen concentration.
    Infants already susceptible to the adverse effects of ibuprofen may be at a slightly higher risk if they receive medication from an impacted bottle. There is a remote probability that infants, who may be more susceptible to a higher potency level of drug, may be more vulnerable to permanent NSAID-associated renal injury. Some units from these six (6) lots have been found to contain Ibuprofen as high as 10% above the specified limit. Studies have shown that safety issues or toxicity is generally accepted to be a concern in infants at doses in excess of 700% of the recommended dose.1 To date, no serious adverse events have been reported related to this recall.
    The product is used as a pain reliever/fever reducer and is packaged in ½ oz. and 1 oz. bottles. This voluntarily recall includes the six (6) lots listed below:
    Lot No.
    NDC
    EXPIRATION
    DESCRIPTION
    COMPANY
    4718
    59779-925-23
    12/19
    CVS Health: Infants’ Ibuprofen Concentrated Oral Suspension, USP, 50 mg per 1.25 mL, in 0.5 oz. bottle
    CVS Pharmacy
    00717005A
    49035-125-24
    02/19
    Equate: Infants’ Ibuprofen Concentrated Oral Suspension, USP, 50 mg per 1.25 mL, in 1.0 oz. bottle
    Wal-Mart Stores Inc.
    00717006A
    59779-925-24(Labeled as: 50428-1252-4)
    02/19
    CVS Health: Infants’ Ibuprofen Concentrated Oral Suspension, USP, 50 mg per 1.25 mL, in 1.0 oz. bottle
    CVS Pharmacy
    00717009A
    (Previously announced)
    49035-125-23
    02/19
    Equate: Ibuprofen Oral Suspension Drops, USP, 50 mg per 1.25 ml, in 0.5 oz. bottle
    Wal-Mart Stores Inc
    00717015A
    (Previously announced)
    49035-125-23
    04/19
    Equate: Ibuprofen Oral Suspension Drops, USP, 50 mg per 1.25 ml, in 0.5 oz. bottle
    Wal-Mart Stores Inc
    00717024A
    (Previously announced)
    49035-125-23
    08/19
    Equate: Ibuprofen Oral Suspension Drops, USP, 50 mg per 1.25 ml, in 0.5 oz. bottle
    Wal-Mart Stores Inc
    59779-925-23
    CVS Health: Ibuprofen Oral Suspension Drops,
    USP, 50 mg per 1.25 ml, in 0.5 oz. bottle
    CVS Pharmacy
    55319-250-23
    Family Wellness: Ibuprofen Oral Suspension Drops,
    USP, 50 mg per 1.25 ml, in 0.5 oz. bottle
    Family Dollar Services Inc.
    Tris Pharma, Inc. manufactures Ibuprofen Oral Suspension Drops, USP for a single customer, who markets and distributes the product to retailers. The retailers should stop further distribution of the affected lots, which are being recalled. Tris Pharma, Inc. has notified its customer by urgent recall notice and has arranged for the return of recalled products from retailers and distributors.
    Consumers with questions regarding this recall may contact Tris Customer Service by 732-940-0358 (Monday through Friday, 8:00 AM ET- 5:00 PM PT) or via email at micc_tris@vigilarebp.com. Consumers, who may be concerned, should contact their physician or healthcare provider if they have experienced any problems that may be related to taking or using this drug product.
  • Oskri Organics Corporation of Lake Mills, WI is recalling ALL Oskri Corporation manufactured nut butters.No illnesses have been reported.
    We began production of the recalled Oskri Corporation manufactured nut butters the beginning of January 2018. This recall pertains to ALL Oskri Corporation manufactured nut butters with Best By dates of June 2020 (6/20) and earlier.
    Oskri Corporation has distributed Nut Butters to the following states: NY, MI, CA, PA, OH, WI, NH, IL, FL, MA, TX, AZ, IN, ID, OR, SC, and RI.
    Nut butters subject to recall include: Almond, Cashew, Coconut, Peanut (all flavor varieties), Pumpkin, Sunflower, and Tahini. Nut butters are sold in 16 oz plastic jars with the Lot Number either on the top or bottom of the jar near the Expiration Date, in Pouches with the Lot Number and Expiration Date located on either the top or bottom of the back of the pouch. On bulk packaging, which would be Oskri Corporation boxes, the label should be located on the box in the upper right-hand corner of one of the four sides. This label will list the lot number, production date, as well as the expiration date.
    If you are in possession of any of these products, we urge you to quarantine and destroy the product immediately.
  • Tyson Foods, Inc., a Sedalia, Mo. establishment, is recalling approximately 36,420 pounds of chicken nugget products that may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically rubber, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.
    The panko chicken nugget items were produced on Nov. 26, 2018. The following products are subject to recall: [View Labels (PDF only)]
    5-lb. plastic packages of “Tyson WHITE MEAT PANKO CHICKEN NUGGETS” with a “BEST IF USED BY” date of “NOV 26 2019,” case code “3308SDL03” and time stamps 23:00 through 01:59 (inclusive).
    The products subject to recall bear establishment number “P-13556” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.  Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Tyson Consumer Relations at 1-888-747-7611. Members of the Media with questions about the recall can contact Worth Sparkman, Senior Communications Manager with Tyson Foods, Inc., at (479) 290-6358.
  • Harvest Food Group, Inc., a Chicago, Ill. establishment, is recalling approximately 47,332 pounds of Not Ready-To-Eat (NRTE) chicken fried rice products due to misbranding and an undeclared allergen, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. The products contain milk, a known allergen, which is not declared on the product label.
    The NRTE chicken fried rice items were produced on Nov. 12, 2018, Dec. 4, 2018 and Dec. 5, 2018. The following products are subject to recall: [View Label (PDF only)]
    9-oz. cardboard packages of “yumnum global cuisine YAKITORI SEASONED CHICKEN FRIED RICE” bearing lot codes “C041A8K12 BEST BY 11/12/2019,” “C091A8L04 BEST BY 12/04/2019,” and “C091A8L05 BEST BY 12/05/2019.”
    The products subject to recall bear establishment number “P-34457” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations in Illinois and Michigan.
    The problem was discovered by the firm during a label inventory check.
    There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.Consumers and members of the media with questions about the recall can contact Ashley Collins, Brand Manager, Yumnum Brand, at (844) 333-2833.
  • Stino Da Napoli, a Rocky River, Ohio establishment, is recalling approximately 11,392 pounds of various meat products that were produced, packed and distributed without the benefit of federal inspection, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.
    The ready-to-eat meat products and meat sauce items were produced from Nov. 30, 2017 through Dec. 20, 2018. The following products are subject to recall: [View Labels (PDF only)]
    24-oz (1.5-lbs.) jarred pasta sauce containing “Stino Da Napoli Gourmet Meat Sauce Bolognese” with lot code 181284000013.
    24-oz. (1.5 lbs.) jarred pasta sauce containing “Stino Da Napoli Gourmet Pasta Sauce with Bacon Fumo Del Vesuvio” with lot code 181284000303.
    1.3-lb. packages containing “Stino’s GOURMET ITALIAN FOODS MEATBALLS” with lot code 181284000167.
    1.2-lb. packages containing “Stino’s GOURMET ITALIAN FOODS MEAT LASAGNA” with lot code 181284000150.
    The sauce products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 45779” inside the USDA mark of inspection. The meatball and lasagna products do not include the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail stores in Ohio.There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider.  Consumers and members of the media with questions about the recall can contact Christian Iacullo, co-owner of Stino Da Napoli, at (216) 536-6107.
  • H & T Seafood, Inc., the Importer of Record, a Bell, Calif. firm, is recalling approximately 71,435 pounds of imported Siluriformes fish products because the products were not presented for import re-inspection upon entry into the United States, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.
    The Siluriformes products were imported from Vietnam to the U.S. on various dates from Nov. 29, 2017 through Oct. 14, 2018. The products have a shelf life of two years. The following products are subject to recall: [View Labels (PDF only)]
    14-oz. vacuum-sealed packages of “PINEAPPLE BRAND FROZEN SHEAT FISH (WILD CAUGHT)” with entry date to the U.S. of 1/3/18 and package code 19330 in Julian Date.
    14-oz. vacuum-sealed packages of “TRAMAN CO. LTE INDIVIDUALLY QUICK FROZEN WILD CAUGHT SILVER SHEAT FISH” with entry date to the U.S. of 1/14/18 and package code 19319 in Julian Date.
    14-oz. vacuum-sealed packages of “PINEAPPLE BRAND FROZEN SHEAT FISH (WILD CAUGHT)” with entry date to the U.S. of 2/1/18 and package code 19330 in Julian Date.
    14-oz. vacuum-sealed packages of “PINEAPPLE BRAND FROZEN SHEAT FISH (WILD CAUGHT)” with entry date 4/25/18 to the U.S.
    14-oz. vacuum-sealed packages of “PINEAPPLE BRAND FROZEN SHEAT FISH (WILD CAUGHT)” with entry date 6/15/18 to the U.S. and package code 20030 in Julian Date.
    14-oz. vacuum-sealed packages of “PINEAPPLE BRAND FROZEN SHEAT FISH (WILD CAUGHT)” with entry date 8/27/18 to the U.S.
    14-oz. vacuum-sealed packages of “PINEAPPLE BRAND FROZEN SHEAT FISH (WILD CAUGHT)” with entry date 9/18/18 to the U.S. and package code 20030 in Julian Date.
    14-oz. vacuum-sealed packages of “PINEAPPLE BRAND FROZEN SHEAT FISH (WILD CAUGHT)” with entry date of 10/14/18 to the U.S. and package code 20090 in Julian Date.
    14-oz. vacuum-sealed packages of “PINEAPPLE BRAND FROZEN SHEAT FISH (WILD CAUGHT)” with entry date 11/29/17 to the U.S.
    14-oz. vacuum-sealed packages of “PINEAPPLE BRAND FROZEN SHEAT FISH (WILD CAUGHT) with entry date 12/19/17 to the U.S.
    14-oz. vacuum-sealed packages of “PINEAPPLE BRAND FROZEN SHEAT FISH (WILD CAUGHT)” with entry date 4/2/18 to the U.S. and Julian Date package code 20030.
    These items were shipped to retail locations in California, Nevada and Texas. There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about a reaction should contact a healthcare provider.  Consumers and members of the media with questions about the recall can contact Roger Kratz, executive vice president of H & T Seafood, Inc., at (213) 309-7192.
  • Johnsonville, LLC, a Sheboygan Falls, Wis. establishment, is recalling approximately 48,371 pounds of raw ground pork patty products that may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically black rubber, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.
    The raw ground frozen pork patties were produced and packaged on Sept. 27, 2018, Oct. 17, 2018 and Oct. 18, 2018. The following products are subject to recall: [View labels (PDF only)]
    24-oz. (1.5 lbs.) plastic bag in a carton of frozen “Johnsonville Grillers CHEDDAR CHEESE & BACON FLAVOR” with “Best Flavor By: 7/24/2019” represented on the label.
    24-oz. (1.5 lbs.) plastic bag in a carton of frozen “Johnsonville Grillers CHEDDAR CHEESE & BACON FLAVOR” with “Best Flavor By: 8/13/2019” represented on the label.
    24-oz. (1.5 lbs.) plastic bag in a carton of frozen “Johnsonville Grillers CHEDDAR CHEESE & BACON FLAVOR” with “Best Flavor By: 8/14/2019” represented on the label.
    The product subject to recall bears establishment number “34225” printed on the carton end under the “Best Flavor By” date. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Johnsonville Consumer Relations, at (888) 556-2728. Members of the media with questions about the recall can contact Stephanie Dlugopolski, PR & social media manager at Johnsonville, LLC, at (920) 889-0782.There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.
  • Perdue Foods, LLC, a Perry, Ga. establishment, is recalling approximately 68,244 pounds of ready-to-eat chicken nugget products that may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically wood, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.
    The ready-to-eat chicken nugget items were produced on Oct. 25, 2018. The following product is subject to recall: [View Labels (PDF only)]
    22-oz. plastic bag packages of frozen “PERDUE SimplySmart ORGANICS BREADED CHICKEN BREAST NUGGETS GLUTEN FREE” with “Best By: Date 10/25/19” and UPC Bar Code “72745-80656” represented on the label.
    The product subject to recall bears establishment number “P-33944” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.
    Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Perdue Consumer Care at (877) 727-3447. Members of the media with questions about the recall can contact Andrea Staub, Sr. Vice President, Perdue Foods, LLC, at (410) 341-2755.There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.
  • Vegetable/Produce Recalls Associated with Mann Packing (Listeria monocytogenes)
  • DKH Cheese Recalls (Listeria monocytogenes contamination)
  • 2016 Frozen vegetable products (Listeria monocytogenes)
  • Sun Pharmaceutical Industries, Inc. (SPII), a wholly owned subsidiary of Sun Pharmaceutical Industries, Ltd. is voluntarily recalling three lots of Vecuronium Bromide for Injection, 10 mg (lyophilized powder), and one lot of Vecuronium Bromide for Injection, 20 mg (lyophilized powder) to the hospital level. The Vecuronium Bromide for Injection has been found to contain particulate matter identified as glass.To date, SPII has not received any reports of adverse events related to this recall.
    Vecuronium Bromide for Injection is used as an adjunct to general anesthesia, to facilitate endotracheal intubation and to provide skeletal muscle relaxation during surgery or mechanical ventilation and is packaged in a glass vial; ten vials per carton. Vecuronium Bromide for Injection should be administered by or under the supervision of experienced clinicians and must be reconstituted prior to use. Consumers with questions regarding this recall can contact SPII by calling 1-800-406-7984 Monday through Friday between 8:00 am to 5:00 pm EST or e-mailing drug.safetyUSA@sunpharma.com. Consumers should contact their physician or healthcare provider if they have experienced any problems that may be related to taking or using this drug product. The affected Vecuronium Bromide for Injection, include the following:
    Product Name
    Lot Number
    NDC Number
    Expiration Date
    Number of Units
    Vecuronium Bromide for Injection, 20 mg
    JKS0400A
    47335-932-44 [carton]
    47335-932-40 [vial]
    03/2019
    1384 cartons
    Vecuronium Bromide for Injection, 10 mg
    JKS0443A
    47335-931-44 [carton]
    47335-931-40 [vial]
    03/2019
    4404 cartons
    Vecuronium Bromide for Injection, 10 mg
    JKS0444A
    47335-931-44 [carton]
    47335-931-40 [vial]
    03/2019
    3744 cartons
    Vecuronium Bromide for Injection, 10 mg
    JKS0477A
    47335-931-44 [carton]
    47335-931-40 [vial]
    03/2019
    4386 cartons
    The product can be identified by vial or carton labeled as Vecuronium Bromide for Injection containing the specific Lot Number and Expiration Dates mentioned above.
  • Grand Strand Sandwich is recalling Lunch Box Italian Subs, Lunch Box Ham & Swiss Croissants and Lunch Box Ham & Cheese Frozen Wedges due to a potential contamination of Listeria monocytogenes. Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, a Listeria monocytogenes infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.
    On January 3, 2019 the firm was notified by FDA that the swabs they collected from the meat slicing area on December 11, 2018 test positive for Listeria monocytogenes.Consumers who have purchased these products are urged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund or they may discard the product. Consumers with questions may contact Kirk McCumbee at 1-843-399-2999 Monday – Thursday 8AM – 4PM, Friday from 8AM – 3PM EST.
    No illnesses have been reported to date.
    Products affected are:
    Product
    Size
    UPC
    Julian Dates
    Italian Subs
    7 oz package
    0 67068 12222 8
    35218
    Ham & Swiss Croissants
    5 oz package
    0 67068 21217 2
    34618
    Ham & Cheese
    4.5oz package
    0 67068 12110 8
    34618
  • Hy-Vee, Inc., based in West Des Moines, Iowa,  is voluntarily recalling its cheesecakes made with Diamond Crystal Brands cheesecake mix due to the potential that they may be contaminated with Salmonella. The potential for contamination was brought to Hy-Vee’s attention today after receiving a letter from the supplier. The voluntary recall includes 32 varieties of cheesecakes in both 8-ounce and 32-ounce packages with best if used by dates of Dec. 6, 2018, through Jan. 11, 2019. No illnesses have been reported to date.The mixture was distributed to 117 of Hy-Vee’s 249 grocery stores across its eight-state region of Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Minnesota and Wisconsin. The product comes in a plastic container with a plastic lid. The expiration date can be found on the label. Customers who purchased any of these products should dispose of them or return them to their local Hy-Vee store for a full refund. Consumers with questions may contact Hy-Vee Customer Care representatives 24 hours a day, seven days a week at 1-800-772-4098.UPC Code:
    Variety and Size:
    02-80142-00000
    Cherry Cheesecake Serving 8oz
    02-80141-00000
    Cherry Cheesecake Family Size 32oz
    02-80146-00000
    Oreo Cheesecake Serving 8oz
    02-80145-00000
    Oreo Cheesecake Family Size 32oz
    02-80148-00000
    Pumpkin Fluff Cheesecake Serving 8oz
    02-80147-00000
    Pumpkin Fluff Cheesecake Family Size 32oz
    02-80150-00000
    Strawberry Cheesecake Serving 8oz
    02-80149-00000
    Strawberry Cheesecake Family Size 32oz
    02-80224-00000
    Mint Cheesecake Serving 8oz
    02-80223-00000
    Mint Cheesecake Family Size 32oz
    02-82327-00000
    Turtle Cheesecake Serving 8oz
    02-82328-00000
    Turtle Cheesecake Family Size 32oz
    02-80153-00000
    Flag Cheesecake Serving 8oz
    02-80151-00000
    Flag Cheesecake Family Size 32oz
    02-82315-00000
    Mint Chip Bettercreme Cheesecake Serving 8oz
    02-82316-00000
    Mint Chip Bettercreme Cheesecake Family Size 32oz
    02-82317-00000
    Strawberry Bettercreme Cheesecake Serving 8oz
    02-82318-00000
    Strawberry Bettercreme Cheesecake Family Size 32oz
    02-82319-00000
    Lemon Bettercreme Cheesecake Serving 8oz
    02-82320-00000
    Lemon Bettercreme Cheesecake Family Size 32oz
    02-82321-00000
    Pumpkin Bettercreme Cheesecake Serving 8oz
    02-82322-00000
    Pumpkin Bettercreme Cheesecake Family Size 32oz
    02-82323-00000
    Chocolate Bettercreme Cheesecake Serving 8oz
    02-82324-00000
    Chocolate Bettercreme Cheesecake Family Size 32oz
    02-82325-00000
    Sea Salted Caramel Bettercreme Cheesecake Serving 8oz
    02-82326-00000
    Sea Salted Caramel Bettercreme Cheesecake Family Size 32oz
    02-82329-00000
    Golden Oreo Bettercreme Cheesecake Serving 8oz
    02-82330-00000
    Golden Oreo Bettercreme Cheesecake Family Size 32oz
    02-82331-00000
    Oreo Bettercreme Cheesecake Serving 8oz
    02-82332-00000
    Oreo Bettercreme Cheesecake Family Size 32oz
    02-82333-00000
    Smores Bettercreme Cheesecake Serving 8oz
    02-82334-00000
    Smores Bettercreme Cheesecake Family Size 32oz
  • Oskri Organics Corporation of Lake Mills, WI is recalling Oskri Organic Sunflower Butter Lot # 099, Oskri Tahini Butter LOT # 193 and Thrive Sunflower Butter LOT # 233, because it has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.
    2 Jars of Oskri Organic Sunflower Butter LOT #099 UPC 666016401295 was distributed in Ohio. The product reached consumers through retail stores.
    Oskri Tahini Butter LOT # 193 UPC 666016401301 was distributed in CA, AZ, GA, CT, IN, TX, FL, ID, SC, NH. The product reached consumers through retail stores, or direct delivery from internet sales. Thrive Sunflower Butter LOT # 233 UPC 671635704825 was distributed in Indiana. The product reached consumers through direct delivery from internet sales.
    To identify the contaminated product, it is in plastic 16oz jars, the LOT Number will be either on the top or bottom of the jar near the expiration date. Oskri Organic Sunflower Butter LOT #099 is greenish-khaki color (expiration 10-2019). Oskri Tahini Butter LOT #193 is a light tan color (expiration 1-2020), the Thrive Sunflower Butter LOT #233 is greenish khaki color (expiration 2-2020).
    No illnesses have been reported to date.Consumers who have purchased Oskri Tahini Butter LOT # 193 and Thrive Sunflower Butter LOT # 233, are urged to destroy the product. Consumers with questions may contact Oskri at (920) 648-8300, Hours phone will be answered are Monday through Friday: 8:00 am to 5:00 pm. You may also contact us via email (info@oskri.com)
  • • 120-2018, CTI Foods LLC, Recalls Ready-To-Eat Pork and Poultry Sausage Products due to Possible Foreign Matter Contamination (Dec. 10, 2018)
  • J. H. Routh Packing Co., a Sandusky, Ohio establishment, is recalling approximately 1,719 pounds of raw pork sausage products that may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically rubber, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.
    The raw ground pork bulk and link sausage items were produced from Jan. 1 through 4, 2019. The following products are subject to recall: [View labels (PDF only)]
    5-lb. plastic packages containing loose, bulk “Daisyfield Brand FRESH PORK SAUSAGE” with production dates “010119” or “010219” or “010319” or “010419” on the label.
    5-lb. paper-lined cardboard packages containing large link “Daisyfield Brand FRESH PORK SAUSAGE” with production dates “010119” or “010219” or “010319” or “010419” on the label.
    5-lb. paper-lined cardboard packages containing country-style rope “Daisyfield Brand FRESH PORK SAUSAGE” with production dates “010119” or “010219” or “010319” or “010419” on the label.
    5-lb. paper-lined cardboard packages containing small, breakfast-style link “Daisyfield Brand FRESH PORK SAUSAGE” with production dates “010119” or “010219” or “010319” or “010419” on the label.
    5-lb. plastic packages containing loose, bulk “Daisyfield Brand ITALIAN SAUSAGE” with production dates “010119” or “010219” or “010319” or “010419” on the label.
    5-lb. paper-lined cardboard packages containing large link “Daisyfield Brand ITALIAN SAUSAGE” links with production dates “010119” or “010219” or “010319” or “010419” on the label.
    5-lb. paper-lined cardboard packages containing country-style rope “Daisyfield Brand ITALIAN SAUSAGE” links with production dates “010119” or “010219” or “010319” or “010419” on the label.Consumers with questions about the recall can contact Tony Stearns, Director of Sales, J. H. Routh Packing, Co. at (419) 626-2251. Members of the media with questions about the recall can contact Jeff Myers, President of Operations, J. H. Routh Packing, Co. at (419) 626-2251.
  • Reminders • 122-2018, Mannarich Food, Inc. Recalls Siluriformes Products Produced without Benefit of Import Inspection (Dec. 15, 2018)
    • 124-2018, Jennie-O Turkey Store Sales, Inc. Recalls Raw Ground Turkey Products due to Possible Salmonella Reading Contamination (Dec 21, 2018)
  • Updates :• 111-2018, Ron’s Home Style Foods Recalls Ready to Eat Chicken Salad Products due to Possible Listeria Contamination (Nov. 14, 2018)
    • 118-2018, Amboy Group, LLC Recalls Poultry Products due to Misbranding and Undeclared Allergens (Dec. 7, 2018)
  • Spokane Produce Inc. of Spokane, WA initiates a voluntary recall of sandwiches containing green leaf lettuce and foodservice lettuce filets following notice of a produce industry ingredient recall by Adam Bros. Farming Inc. Sandwich products bearing the Northwest Cuisine Creations and Fresh&Local labels. These products are recalled because they may be contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 bacteria (E. Coli O157:H7). E. coli O157:H7 causes a diarrheal illness often with bloody stools.
    Daniel J. Petek  (509)710 -8301
    All sandwiches bear the “best buy” dating 12/14/18-12/21/18. The product was distributed to grocery markets in Washington, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming and Oregon. In addition, Green Leaf Filets (no label) in five(5) and ten(10) pound containers are being recalled from foodservice accounts. The affected products distributed by Spokane Produce include green leaf lettuce that was originated and recalled from Adam Bros. Farming Inc. of Santa Maria, CA. The recall was initiated after it was discovered that sediment from a reservoir near where the Adam Bros. Farm produce was grown tested positive for E.coli O157:H7. Filtered and treated water from the reservoir may have come in contact with the produce after it was harvested. None of the filtered, treated water has tested positive for E. coli, all E. coli tests returning negative.
    “We are taking extreme precautionary measures,” notes Dan Petek, Spokane Produce spokesperson. “To date, there have been no cases of E coli or contamination from any Adam Bros. green leaf lettuce. In complete regard for the public at large and our customers, we believe it is prudent at this point to be proactive and call in all product.”
    Out of an abundance of caution, as a service to the general consuming public at large, product is being recalled in consultation with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). No illnesses have been reported to date.
    Consumers who purchased any of the sandwiches bearing the “best buy 12/14/18-12/21/18” are advised not to eat any product and should destroy or return the product to the place of purchase.