1969 – The U.S. Supreme Court ordered an immediate end to all school segregation … In Memory


The outside of the Supreme CourtBy Sameer Rao Oct 29, 2015  Photo: Getty Images

On this day in 1969, the Supreme Court ordered immediate public school desegregation throughout the United States via its decision in Alexander v. Holmes County Board of Education.

Fifteen years after the U.S. Supreme Court ordered public school desegregation with “all deliberate speed” in Brown v. Board of Education Topeka, Kansas, most Southern states still had yet to fulfill its mandate.

It would take the action of Fifth Circuit Judge Hugo Black and the NAACP to force real change. Members of the NAACP protested a circuit court ruling in the summer of 1969 that granted the Justice Department and Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) an extension until December 1 to draw up desegregation plans for 33 Mississippi school districts. Given that it had already been nearly five years since the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the NAACP took the case to the Supreme Court

In Alexander v. Holmes County Board of Education—which was decided on this day in 1969—the Court ruled to underscore their previous mandates in Brown and Brown II and ordered immediate desegregation of public schools. Noting that the “all deliberate speed” language in Brown enabled Southern states to procrastinate, the Court’s decision took no chances, saying, “The obligation of every school district is to terminate dual school systems at once and to operate now and hereafter only unitary schools.”

Although much of the American public school system still remains racially segregated, the Supreme Court’s ruling is still an important standard for which to aspire and, thus, worthy of today’s #TBT.
Read the Court’s Alexander v. Holmes County Board of Education decision here.

Resource: colorlines.com

1972 – U.S. President Richard Nixon approved legislation to increase Social Security spending by $5.3 billion.


On October 30, 1969, Richard Nixon signed landmark social security and Medicare legislation increasing much-needed benefits to widowed seniors who now receive 100 percent of their deceased spouses Social Security benefits and extended medical coverage to 1.5 million beneficiaries. The following is Nixon’s radio address broadcast the same day the legislation was passed:

Good afternoon:

A President signs many bills, but one that I signed today gave me special satisfaction because of the enormous impact it can have on the lives of millions of individual Americans.

I refer to the legislation known as H.R. 1–and especially to its provisions for helping, older Americans. Many of these provisions grew out of recommendations which I have been urging the Congress to act on for several years.

Let’s look at some of the things H.R. 1 will do:

First, nearly 4 million widows and widowers will get larger social security benefits–the full 100 percent of what was payable to the individual’s late husband or wife. This will mean more than $1 billion in additional income for these deserving people in the next fiscal year.

Second, over a million and a half older Americans who are now working can earn more income without having their benefits reduced.

Until today, if you were receiving social security, every dollar you earned above $1,680 cost you 50 cents in benefits–and every dollar you earned above $2,880 cost you a full dollar. But under the new provision-which I have advocated for years–you can earn up to $2,100 without losing a cent of social security, and every dollar you earn above that $2,100–no matter how many–will cost you only 50 cents in benefits. This will encourage more older Americans to work–helping them and helping the country.

resource: internet


October Awareness Month


October 2nd:                    World Smile Day

October 6th:                     Physician Assistant Day

October 9th:                     Emergency Nurse Day

October 12th:                   Columbus Day

October 13th:                   United States Navy – Happy Birthday 1775

October 14th:                   S.A.V.E. Day (Stop American Violence Everywhere)

October 16th:                   Bosses Day

October 17th:                   Sweetest Day

October 24th:                   Make A Difference Day

October 31st:                   Halloween

October 4-10:                   Mental Illness Awareness Week  (Green)

October 5-9:                     Customer Service Week

October 18-24:                 Invisible Disabilities Awareness Week (Purple)

October 19-25:                 Male Breast Cancer Awareness Week (Pink-Blue)

October 23-31:                 Red Ribbon Week  (Red)

October 31-November 2:             Day of the Dead (Dia de Los Muertos)

Breast Cancer Awareness Month  (Pink)

Fire Prevention Awareness Month  (Thin Red Line)

Domestic Violence Awareness Month  (Purple)

Down Syndrome Awareness Month  (Blue-Yellow)

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Awareness Month  (Pink-Blue)

Pregnancy & Infant Loss Awareness Month  (Pink-Blue)

National Bullying Prevention Month  (Blue)

Liver Cancer Awareness Month  (Green)

pinmart.com

1945 – The U.S. government announced the end of shoe rationing.


Posted by Gerry le Roux in Special days

on 30 October 1945 – a happy day for shoe lovers! – the rationing was lifted. Men were again able to buy as many pairs of work boots as they liked. Shoe addicts were no longer bound by the painful limit of three pairs of new must-have’s a year. Children could get all the shoes they needed to accommodate their growing feet. And athletes could burn through as many pairs of sneakers as they wanted.

I for one would have easily been able to carry on as normal during the great WWII shoe rationing – shoes are practical things, after all, and surely don’t need replacing until they fall apart, do they? And, in most cases, they’re not even good for you – as I’ve mentioned before, you’re definitely better off going barefoot when possible. So the whole shoe addiction thing is a bit of a mystery to me.

Resource: sciencelens.co.nz