1983 – General Motors agreed to hire more women and minorities for five years as part of a settlement with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.


Today in labor history: General Motors agrees to end employment discrimination

On October 18, 1983, the General Motors Corporation, the largest automobile manufacturer in the U.S., agreed to hire more women and minorities as part of a settlement with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

The turnaround came ten years after the commission had filed a complaint that African Americans, Latinos, other minorities, and women were being unfairly treated by the corporation. The commission filed a lawsuit against the company, and General Motors agreed to pay $42.5 million in what was at the time called the largest out-of-court settlement of an employment discrimination case.

The company simultaneously agreed to spend another $8.9 million developing a program for hiring, training, and promoting minority and female workers. General Motors also agreed to give those workers preference in the distribution of education assistance funds.

In addition, the company spent $3 million on training for African America, Latino, and female clerical employees; $2 million training them for highly technical positions; and another $2 million training them in mathematics and other areas that would qualify them for apprenticeship programs.

source: peoplesworld.org

1968 – Two black athletes, Tommie Smith and John Carlos, were suspended by the U.S. Olympic Committee for giving a “black power” salute during a ceremony in Mexico City.


Gold medalist Tommie Smith (center) and bronze medalist John Carlos (right) showing the raised fist on the podium after the 200 m race at the 1968 Summer Olympics; both wear Olympic Project for Human Rights badges. Peter Norman (silver medalist, left) from Australia also wears an OPHR badge in solidarity with Smith and Carlos.

source: wiki

on this day 10/18 1983 – General Motors agreed to hire more women and minorities for five years as part of a settlement with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. 


1469 – Ferdinand of Aragon married Isabella of Castile. The marriage united all the dominions of Spain.

1685 – King Louis XIV of France revoked the Edict of Nantes, which had established the legal toleration of the Protestant population.

1767 – The Mason-Dixon line was agreed upon. It was the boundary between Maryland and Pennsylvania.

1842 – Samuel Finley Breese Morse laid his first telegraph cable.

1860 – British troops burned the Yuanmingyuan at the end of the Second Opium War.

1867 – The U.S. took formal possession of Alaska from Russia. The land was purchased of a total of $7 million dollars (2 cents per acre). 

1873 – The first rules for intercollegiate football were drawn up by representatives from Rutgers, Yale, Columbia and Princeton Universities.

1892 – The first long-distance telephone line between Chicago, IL, and New York City, NY, was opened.

1898 – The American flag was raised in Puerto Rico only one year after the Caribbean nation won its independence from Spain. 

1929 – The Judicial Committee of England’s Privy Council ruled that women were to be considered as persons in Canada.

1943 – The first broadcast of “Perry Mason” was presented on CBS Radio. The show went to TV in 1957.

1944 – Czechoslovakia was invaded by the Soviets during World War II.

1944 – “Forever Amber”, written by Kathleen Windsor, was first published.

1961 – Henri Matiss’ “Le Bateau” went on display at New York’s Museum of Modern Art. It was discovered 46 days later that the painting had been hanging upside down.

1967 – The American League granted permission for the A’s to move to Oakland. Also, new franchises were awarded to Kansas City and Seattle.

1968 – Two black athletes, Tommie Smith and John Carlos, were suspended by the U.S. Olympic Committee for giving a “black power” salute during a ceremony in Mexico City.

1969 – The U.S. government banned artificial sweeteners due to evidence that they caused cancer.

1970 – Quebec’s minister of labor was found strangled to death after eight days of being held captive by the Quebec Liberation Front (FLQ).

1971 – After 34 years, the final issue of “Look” magazine was published.

1977 – Reggie Jackson tied Babe Ruth’s record for hitting three homeruns in a single World Series game. Jackson was only the second player to achieve this.

1983 – General Motors agreed to hire more women and minorities for five years as part of a settlement with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. 

1989 – Egon Krenz became the leader of East Germany after Erich Honecker was ousted. Honeker had been in power for 18 years.

1989 – The space shuttle Atlantis was launched on a mission that included the deployment of the Galileo space probe. 

1990 – Iraq made an offer to the world that it would sell oil for $21 a barrel. The price level was the same as it had been before the invasion of Kuwait.

1997 – A monument honoring U.S. servicewomen, past and present, was dedicated at Arlington National Cemetery. 

2013 – Saudi Arabia became the first nation to reject a seat on the United Nations Security Council. Jordan took the seat on December 6.