1930 Vatican approves rhythm method for birth control


Pill_church_vatican_RK.jpg
The Vatican. Richard McNight.

Until the 1930s, the Catholic Church was not alone in its opposition to contraceptives. In the Christian tradition, birth control had long been associated with promiscuity and adultery and resolutely condemned. However, after the Anglican Church passed a resolution in favor of birth control at its 1930 Lambeth Conference, other Protestant denominations began to relax their prohibitions as well. Nevertheless, the Catholic Church held fast to its opposition.

The Vatican’s stand against contraception was centuries old. For much of that time, however, birth control had remained a dormant issue. Since most birth control consisted of folk remedies and homemade cervical caps, there was little cause for the Church to respond. It was the mass production and availability of rubber condoms and diaphragms in the 1920s and 1930s, made possible by the 1839 invention of vulcanized rubber, which eventually forced the Church to take a public position on specific contraceptives.

For the complete article .. pbs.org

Dec 4, 1942: Polish Christians come to the aid of Polish Jews


In Warsaw, a group of Polish Christians put their own lives at risk when they set up the Council for the Assistance of the Jews. The group was led by two women, Zofia Kossak and Wanda Filipowicz.

Since the German invasion of Poland in 1939, the Jewish population had been either thrust into ghettos, transported to concentration and labor camps, or murdered. Jewish homes and shops were confiscated and synagogues were burned to the ground. Word about the Jews’ fate finally leaked out in June of 1942, when a Warsaw underground newspaper, the Liberty Brigade, made public the news that tens of thousands of Jews were being gassed at Chelmno, a death camp in Poland—almost seven months after the extermination of prisoners began.

Despite the growing public knowledge of the “Final Solution,” the mass extermination of European Jewry and the growing network of extermination camps in Poland, little was done to stop it. Outside Poland, there were only angry speeches from politicians and promises of postwar reprisals. Within Poland, non-Jewish Poles were themselves often the objects of persecution and forced labor at the hands of their Nazi occupiers; being Slavs, they too were considered “inferior” to the Aryan Germans

For the complete article …   history.com 

1942 FDR orders dismantling of Works Progress Administration


WPA-USA-sign.svg

The Works Progress Administration (WPA) was an ambitious employment and infrastructure program created by President Roosevelt in 1935, during the bleakest years of the Great Depression. Over its eight years of existence, the WPA put roughly 8.5 million Americans to work. Perhaps best known for its public works projects, the WPA also sponsored projects in the arts – the agency employed tens of thousands of actors, musicians, writers and other artists.

What Was the WPA?

President Franklin D. Roosevelt created the WPA with an executive order on May 6, 1935. It was part of his New Deal plan to lift the country out of the Great Depression by reforming the financial system and restoring the economy to pre-Depression levels.

For the complete article … history.com

1945 – The U.S. Senate approved American participation in the United Nations.


December 4, 1945: The Day the Senate Surrendered Our Sovereignty

On December 4, 1945, the United States Senate passed the United Nations Participation Act, committing the United States to full, active participation in the United Nations. While the date does not have the kind of national recognition and observance given to the December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, or the November 22, 1963 assassination of President Kennedy, December 4 is a date on which the U.S. Senate — often called “the world’s greatest deliberative body — voted to seriously compromise a significant feature of the nation’s sovereignty. The bill was approved by the House and signed into law by President Truman later that month

for more info .. December 4, 1945: The Day the Senate Surrendered Our Sovereignty
Written by Jack Kenny   thenewamerican.com