Immigration reform bill


 

immigrationWe are fast approaching the critical moment that our movement has made possible: S. 744, the bipartisan immigration bill, is expected to be introduced to the full Senate early next week for debate, amendment and a full vote.

We must keep up the pressure to ensure the bill we have been fighting for continues to move forward.

Dial 888-891-3271 or click here to call your Senator now.

We have proven the power of our movement before. Our calls, faxes, and contacts to the Senate helped advance the bill this far — but as this bill moves to the full Senate, it will be even more vulnerable to amendments that could jeopardize the path to citizenship for millions of families.

Dial 888-891-3271 or click here to call your Senator in support of reform with a path to citizenship.

The Senate has the opportunity to make history by passing a reform law that keeps families together and strengthens our country by creating a pathway to full citizenship. We must make sure that the Senate passes this important bill. Millions of American families depend on it.

Click here to be immediately connected to your Senator and tell them to support immigration reform.

With hope,

Donna De La Cruz Reform Immigration FOR America

P.S. We need your help to ensure that Congress hears our message. Forward this email to your friends — together we will make immigration reform a reality!

Banks taken to court!



Yesterday, the NY Attorney General announced plans to file a lawsuit against HSBC for ignoring the law and hurting families in foreclosure. Big banks like HSBC think the rules don’t apply to them — not acceptable!

Over 40,000 people have already joined Elizabeth Warren in saying that we need to protect the public and break up the big banks.

Can you add your voice in support of the Brown-Vitter bill to break up the big banks? Click here to sign the petition.

Thanks! — Adam Green


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Stand with Elizabeth Warren

 

Elizabeth Warren did it again.

In another moment sure to go viral on YouTube, she grilled Treasury Secretary Jack Lew on the Obama administration’s opposition to breaking up the big Wall Street banks that are “too big to fail.”

Warren endorsed breaking up the big banks and preventing future bailouts. Senators Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) and David Vitter (R-Louisiana) have introduced a new bipartisan bill to do just that.

Watch Elizabeth Warren in action — and join her in urging President Obama and Congress to end “too big to fail.” Sign our petition supporting the Brown-Vitter bill.

Warren pointed out that the largest financial institutions are getting bigger and bigger — 30% larger than they were when they wrecked our economy.

She asked Treasure Secretary Lew, “How big do the biggest banks have to get before we consider breaking them up?” He had no answer.

The media and political insiders need to see the public quickly rallying around Warren in order for her grilling yesterday to make a lasting impact.

Watch Warren in action and sign our petition in support of breaking up the big banks.

Thanks for being a bold progressive.

Do it for the CHILDREN!


ThinkProgress War Room

Time to Invest More in Early Childhood Education

Today is a national day of action on early learning, with a broad coalition of groups pushing for significant new investments in early childhood education.

The president proposed historic investments in our kids in his State of the Union speech and budget, including voluntary preschool for all four year-olds. Investments like this are the right thing to do for our kids and for our economy. Here’s five reasons why:

1. Preschool can help combat crime, teen pregnancy, and high school dropout rates. When children have the benefit of a high-quality early childhood education, they make cognitive and social gains that prepare them to start school. These foundational skills allow them to build on their learning and knowledge through school and into adulthood. As a result, a child without an early childhood education is 25 percent more likely to drop out of school, 40 percent more likely to become a teenage parent, and 70 percent more likely to be arrested for a violent crime.

2. Early childhood education has a better return on investment than the stock market. Some policymakers worry about the upfront cost of early childhood education. However, studies show that early childhood education is one of the best investments we can make—and that includes investments in the financial market. The estimated return on investment for high quality early childhood education is ten percent. In comparison, the average return on investment in the stock market is 7.2 percent.

Why does early childhood education pay off so well? Children who participate need fewer services over the course of their lifetime. The benefits show up almost right away, with reduced need for special education and grade retention, which costs taxpayers an estimated $7,500 per child.  Over time, we reap benefits when these children become adults and need fewer public benefits and are less likely to be incarcerated.

3. The U.S. lags behind almost every other country when it comes to preschool, including Mexico, Chile, and Russia. When it comes to access to high-quality preschool, the U.S. is getting beat by virtually every other developed country, including Mexico, Chile, Russia, and New Zealand. Each of these countries—and most of Western Europe and Scandinavia—enroll a greater proportion of four year olds in preschool and invest more in early childhood education relative to the size of their economies. If the U.S. wants to compete in a global market and continue its role as an economic and military superpower, we must keep up with other countries when it comes to early childhood education.

4. Early childhood education is a bipartisan issue. Politicians from both sides of the aisle recognize that when we invest in early childhood education, we improve the lives of children and families and save money for generations to come. That’s why 27 governors mentioned early childhood education in their state of the state addresses and 14 were Republicans. Governors from Alabama, Michigan, Indiana, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia, to name a few, all advocated for expanded access to preschool.

One reason why both liberals and conservatives support early childhood education is that it’s necessary to ensure our country’s economic health and military readiness. In fact, business and military leaders have called on the president and Congress to fund early childhood education.

5. Preschool can save families thousands of dollars in child care costs each year. Early childhood education is an expense that few families can afford. The estimated cost of sending a four year old to a center-based child care ranges from $4,000 per year in Mississippi to $12,000 per year in Massachusetts. For families living below the poverty level with children under five, child care costs constitute 36 percent of a family’s budget each month. In most regions of the country, the cost of child care exceeds every other household expense, including housing, transportation, food, and health care. Few families have access to subsidies to help alleviate the cost of child care; just one in five eligible families receives those benefits.

And while child care is expensive, the quality varies considerably. In many cases, parents are paying for child care that is mediocre at best. In state preschools programs, the states dictate quality standards, such as ensuring that programs are taught by certified teachers with a college degree and mandating a developmentally appropriate curriculum. Thus, children are much more likely to be in high quality settings that are preparing them for school.

You can find even more information on why these investments make sense, enjoy bipartisan support, and have a strong record of success HERE.

You can also find out how much your state would benefit in year one of the president’s proposal HERE.

the Senate considers S.954 S.953 S.1003&S.744 :::::: CONGRESS :::::: the House considers HR2217


  • visitors-memorials-eve
  • The Senate will not be in session on Wednesday, June 5th in order to allow Senators to attend the funeral services of Senator Lautenberg.
  • The Senate stands in adjournment under the provisions of S.Res.161, as a further mark of respect to the memory of the late Senator Frank R. Lautenberg of New Jersey.
  •  The Senate will convene at 9:00am on Thursday, June 6, 2013.
  •   Following any Leader remarks, the Senate will resume consideration of S.954, the Farm bill.
  • During Tuesday’s session of the Senate, cloture was filed on S.954, the Farm bill.
  • As a result, the filing deadline for first degree amendments to the bill is 1:00pm on Wednesday, June 5th (notwithstanding the Senate not being in session).
  • The filing deadline for second degree amendments is 9:45am on Thursday, June 6th.
  • Also during Tuesday’s session, cloture was filed on the following items:
  • At 10:00am, there will be 3 roll call votes on the following in the following order:
    • Motion to invoke cloture on S.954, the Farm bill,
    • Motion to invoke cloture on the motion to proceed to S.1003, A bill to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to reset interest rates for new student loans (Coburn) and
    • Motion to invoke cloture on the motion to proceed to S.953, the Student Loan Affordability Act (Reed).
    • By consent, S.744, a bill to provide for comprehensive immigration reform, as reported, was star printed to make technical corrections to the committee-reported substitute amendment. Attached to this email you will find a summary of the corrections.Senator Reid then moved to proceed to S.744, and filed cloture on the motion to proceed. The cloture vote will occur at a time to be determined next week.
    • As a reminder, the filing deadline for second degree amendments to S.954, the Farm bill, is 9:45am today.If your Senator has a germane amendment and would like to preserve his or her ability to offer, please send a signed copy of the amendment to the cloakroom prior to the deadline.  If you have already filed, there is no need to re-file.
    • The time until 10:00am is equally divided between the two Leaders or their designees. At 10:00am, the Senate will proceed to a series of 3 roll call votes in relation to the following motions:-          Motion to invoke cloture on S.954, the Farm bill,-          Motion to invoke cloture on the motion to proceed to S.1003, A bill to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to reset interest rates for new student loans (Coburn) and-          Motion to invoke cloture on the motion to proceed to S.953, the Student Loan Affordability Act (Reed).Following the votes, the Senate will be in a period of morning business until 11:45am with the time equally divided between the two Leaders or their designees. Senator Reid will be recognized at that time.
    • 10:01am The Senate began a  roll call vote on the motion to invoke cloture on S.954, the Farm bill;Invoked: 75-22
    • 10:34am The Senate began a roll call vote on the motion to invoke cloture on the motion to proceed to S.1003, A bill to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to reset interest rates for new student loans (Coburn);Not Invoked: 40-57
    • 10:54am The Senate began a roll call vote on motion to invoke cloture on the motion to proceed to S.953, the Student Loan Affordability Act (Reed);Not Invoked: 51-46
    • Cloture on the motion to proceed to S.943, the Reed student loan bill, was not invoked 51-46. The Senate is now in a period of morning business until 12:30pm.
    • There will be no further roll call votes today or tomorrow.
    • ********** We expect to be in session tomorrow, Friday, June 7 from the 9:30 until 1:30pm range **********
    • The Senate stands in adjournment until 9:30am on Friday, June 7, 2013.
    • Following any Leader remarks, the Senate will resume the motion to proceed to S.744, the Comprehensive Immigration Reform bill. The time until 1:30pm will be for debate on the motion to proceed with Senator Sessions, or his designee, controlling three hours and the Majority Leader, or his designee, controlling the remaining time.
    • There will be no roll call votes on Friday. The next roll call vote will be at 5:30pm on Monday, June 10th on passage of S.954, the Farm bill.
    • We are still working on an agreement to complete action of the Farm bill and to begin consideration of the Immigration Reform bill. Another message will be sent if an when an agreement is reached.
    • The Senate has reached an agreement to consider the Alejandro and Schmehl nominations at a time to be determined, with 30 minutes for debate prior to votes on confirmation of the nominations. The agreement is as follows:At a time to be determined by the Majority Leader, in consultation with the Republican Leader, the Senate proceed to Executive Session to consider the following nominations:-          Executive Calendar #47, Nitza I. Quinones Alejandro, of Pennsylvania, to be United States District Judge for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.-          Executive Calendar #49, Jeffrey L. Schmehl, of Pennsylvania to be United States District Judge for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.that there be 30 minutes for debate equally divided in the usual form; that following the use or yielding back of time, the Senate proceed to vote without intervening action or debate on the nominations in the order listed; the motions to reconsider be considered made and laid upon the table with no intervening action or debate; that no further motions be in order; that any related statements be printed in the Record; that the President be immediately notified of the Senate’s action and the Senate then resume legislative session.
    • The Senate has reached an agreement to vote in relation to the pending Leahy amendment #998 (to establish a pilot program for gigabit Internet projects in rural areas), on passage of the Farm bill, to set the cloture vote on the motion to proceed to S.744, Comprehensive Immigration Reform, and on adoption of the motion to proceed.
    • The vote schedule is as follows:5:30pm Monday, June 10:–          Leahy amendment #998 (voice vote expected)-          Passage of S.954, the Farm billTuesday, June 11:

      –          2:15pm Cloture on motion to proceed to S.744, Comprehensive Immigration Reform

      –          4:00pm Adoption of the motion to proceed to S.744, Comprehensive Immigration Reform

      Agreement to complete action on the Farm bill and Comprehensive Immigration Reform:

      Following any Leader remarks on Friday, June 7th, the Senate resume consideration of the motion to proceed to Calendar #80, S.744; that the time until 1:30pm be divided as follows:  Senator Sessions, or designee, controlling three hours and the Majority Leader, or designee, controlling the remaining time; further.

      Following any Leader remarks on Monday, June 10th, the Senate resume consideration of the motion to proceed to S.744; that the time until 5pm be divided as follows:  Senator Sessions, or designee, controlling two hours, and Senator Leahy, or designee, controlling the remaining time.

      At 5pm, the Senate resume consideration of S.954, the Farm bill with the time until 5:30pm equally divided between the two Leaders, or their designees; that at 5:30pm, all post-cloture time be considered expired and the Senate proceed to vote in relation to the Leahy amendment, with no amendments in order to the amendment prior to the vote; and upon disposition of the Leahy amendment, the Senate proceed to vote on passage of S.954, as amended.

      Upon disposition of S.954, the Senate resume consideration of the motion to proceed to S.744, with Senator Sessions, or designee, controlling one hour of debate on Monday evening.

      Following any Leader remarks on Tuesday, June 11th, the Senate resume consideration of the motion to proceed to S.744, with the time until 12:30pm equally divided between the proponents and opponents; further, with Senator Sessions, or designee, controlling up to one hour of that time.

      At 2:15pm, on Tuesday, June 11th, the Senate proceed to vote on the motion to invoke cloture on the motion to proceed to S.744. Finally, if cloture is invoked on the motion to proceed, the time until 4pm, be equally divided between the proponents and opponents; and at 4pm, the Senate proceed to vote on the adoption of the motion to proceed to S.744.

    • WRAP UP
    • 1) Motion to invoke cloture on S.954, the Farm bill; Invoked: 75-222) Motion to invoke cloture on the motion to proceed to S.1003, A bill to amend the Higher Education Act of 1965 to reset interest rates for new student loans (Coburn); Not Invoked: 40-573) Motion to invoke cloture on the motion to proceed to S.943, Motion to invoke cloture on the motion to proceed to S.953, the Student Loan Affordability Act (Reed); Not Invoked: 51-46No LEGISLATIVE ITEMSEXECUTIVE ITEMS

      Confirmed the following items:

      Executive Calendar #141 Rachel Elise Barkow – to be a Member of the United States Sentencing Commission for a term expiring October 31, 2017

      Executive Calendar #142 Charles R. Breyer – to be a Member of the United States Sentencing Commission for a term expiring October 31, 2015

      Executive Calendar #143 William H. Pryor, Jr. – to be a Member of the United States Sentencing Commission for a term expiring October 31, 2017

      Confirmed all nominations on the Secretary’s desk in Air Force, Army, Marine Corps and Navy and the following items:

      AIR FORCE

      Executive Calendar #147 Maj. Den. Douglas J. Robb – to be Lieutenant General

      Executive Calendar #148 Lt. Gen. Stephen L. Hoog – to be Lieutenant General

      Executive Calendar #149 Lt. Gen. Brooks L. Bash – to be Lieutenant General

      ARMY

      Executive Calendar #150 Maj. Gen. Joseph Anderson -to be Lieutenant General

      Executive Calendar #151 Maj. Gen. Thomas W. Spoehr – to be Lieutenant General

      Executive Calendar #152 Lt. Gen. John D. Johnson -to be Lieutenant General

      Executive Calendar #153 Col. Ivan E. Denton – to be Brigadier General

      NAVY

      Executive Calendar #154 Capt. Brian S. Pecha – to be Rear Admiral (lower half)

      Executive Calendar #155 Capt. Victor W. Hall – to be Rear Admiral (lower half)

      Executive Calendar #156 Capt. Priscilla B. Coe – to be Rear Admiral (lower half)

      Executive Calendar #157 Capt. Christina M. Alvarado – to be Rear Admiral (lower half)

      Executive Calendar #158 Capt. James R. McNeal – to be Rear Admiral (lower half)

      Executive Calendar #159 Capt. Daniel L. Gard – to be Rear Admiral (lower half)

      Executive Calendar #160 Capt. Mark J. Fung – to be Rear Admiral (lower half)

      Executive Calendar #161 Capt. Alma M.O.L. Grocki – to be Rear Admiral (lower half)

      Executive Calendar #162 Capt. William K. Davis – to be Rear Admiral (lower half)

      Executive Calendar #163 Capt. Daniel J. MacDonnell – to be Rear Admiral (lower half)

      Executive Calendar #164 to be Rear Admiral (lower half)-

      Capt. William J. Galinis

      Capt. Jon A. Hill

      Executive Calendar #165 to be Rear Admiral (lower half)-

      Capt. Christian D. Becker

      Capt. Gordon D. Peters

      Executive Calendar #166 to be Rear Admiral (lower half)-

      Capt. John P. Polowczyk

      Capt. Paul J. Verrastro

      Executive Calendar #167 Rear Adm. (lh) Paula C. Brown – to be Rear Admiral

      Executive Calendar #168 Rear Adm. (lh) Thomas E. Beeman – to be Rear Admiral

      Executive Calendar #169 to be Rear Admiral-

      Rear Adm. (lh) Kelvin N. Dixon

      Rear Adm. (lh) Brian L. LaRoche

      Rear Adm. (lh) John C. Sadler

      Executive Calendar #170 Rear Adm. William A. Brown – to be Vice Admiral

      Executive Calendar #171 Rear Adm. Robert L. Thomas, Jr. – to be Vice Admiral

      Executive Calendar #172 Rear Adm. Nora W. Tyson – to be Vice Admiral

      MARINE CORPS

      Executive Calendar #173 to be Brigadier General-

      Col. David G. Bellon

      Col. Raymond R. Descheneaux

      Executive Calendar #174 to be Brigadier General-

      Colonel James W. Bierman, Jr.

      Colonel Robert F. Castellvi

      Colonel David J. Furness

      Colonel Michael S. Groen

      Colonel Kevin M. Iiams

      Colonel John M. Jansen

      Colonel Kevin J. Killea

      Colonel David A. Ottignon

      Colonel Thomas D. Weidley

      Colonel Terry V. Williams

    ********************************************************************

  • June 2013
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    • 9:01:43 A.M. – ONE MINUTE SPEECHES – The
      House proceeded with one minute speeches, which by direction of the Chair would
      be limited to 5 per side of the aisle.

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