Tag Archives: West Virginia

Why the Founder of Mother’s Day Turned Against It : by Sarah Pruitt


a repost

Beginning in the 1850s, Ann Reeves Jarvis of West Virginia started Mothers’ Day Work Clubs in order to teach women proper child-care techniques and sanitation methods. In the years following the Civil War, these same clubs became a unifying force for a country ripped apart by conflict. In 1868, Jarvis and other women organized a Mothers Friendship Day, when mothers gathered with former soldiers of both the Union and Confederacy to promote reconciliation. After Ann Reeves Jarvis died in 1905, it was her daughter Anna Jarvis who would work tirelessly to make Mother’s Day a national holiday.

Fairtradeflowers

Anna Jarvis, who had no children of her own, conceived of Mother’s Day as an occasion for honoring the sacrifices individual mothers made for their children.

In May 1908, she organized the first official Mother’s Day events at a church in her hometown of Grafton, West Virginia, as well as at a Wanamaker’s department store in Philadelphia, where she lived at the time. Jarvis then began writing letters to newspapers and politicians pushing for the adoption of Mother’s Day as an official holiday. By 1912, many other churches, towns and states were holding Mother’s Day celebrations, and Jarvis had established the Mother’s Day International Association. Her hard-fought campaign paid off in 1914, when President Woodrow Wilson signed a bill officially establishing the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day.

Jarvis’ conceived of of Mother’s Day as an intimate occasion—a son or daughter honoring the mother they knew and loved—and not a celebration of all mothers. For this reason, she always stressed the singular “Mother’s” rather than the plural. She soon grew disillusioned, as Mother’s Day almost immediately became centered on the buying and giving of printed cards, flowers, candies and other gifts. Seeking to regain control of the holiday she founded, Jarvis began openly campaigning against those who profited from Mother’s Day, including confectioners, florists and other retailers. She launched numerous lawsuits against groups using the name Mother’s Day, and eventually spent much of her sizeable inheritance on legal fees.

In 1925, when an organization called the American War Mothers used Mother’s Day as an occasion for fundraising and selling carnations, Jarvis crashed their convention in Philadelphia and was arrested for disturbing the peace. Later, she even attacked First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt for using Mother’s Day as an occasion to raise money for charity. By the 1940s, Jarvis had disowned the holiday altogether, and even actively lobbied the government to see it removed from the calendar. Her efforts were to no avail, however, as Mother’s Day had taken on a life of its own as a commercial goldmine. Largely destitute, and unable to profit from the massively successful holiday she founded, Jarvis died in 1948 in Philadelphia’s Marshall Square Sanitarium.

The sad history of Mother’s Day founder Anna Jarvis has done nothing to slow down the popularity—and commercialism—of the holiday. According to an annual spending survey conducted by the National Retail Federation, Americans will spend an average of $168.94 on Mother’s Day in 2013, a whopping 11 percent increase from 2012. In total, Mother’s Day spending is expected to reach $20.7 billion this year. In addition to the more traditional gifts (ranging from cards, flowers and candy to clothing and jewelry), the survey showed that an unprecedented 14.1 percent of gift-givers plan to buy their moms high-tech gadgets like smartphones and tablets.

Emergency call to Save Blair Mountain …Amanda Starbuck, Rainforest Action Network


Rainforest Action Network
Tell Arch Coal To Stop Mining Blair Mountain
Blair Mt
Take Action

Mountaintop removal coal mining is destroying the mountains and threatening the health and lives of communities across Appalachia. But people in Appalachia are standing up and today they need your support.

Residents of Blair, West Virginia have noticed increased activity from mining company Arch Coal around Blair Mountain — site of the largest labor uprising in American history. Residents are becoming increasingly concerned about Arch’s activities and fear they will move forward with plans to mine the historic location.

Take action today – call Arch Coal to save Blair Mountain.

Arch Coal has four planned operations on Blair Mountain, some of which intrude onto the battlefield. Today, this multi-billion dollar company will announce its profits from the fourth quarter of last year. Whatever those earnings are, the company has a responsibility to the community in which it operates.

Folks in Appalachia won’t stand for Arch Coal’s plan to destroy their community and our nation’s history just so the coal company can increase its profit margin, and we shouldn’t either.

Call Arch CEO, Steven Leer, today and tell him that Appalachian communities should not fall victim to pad his profit margin.

Call Arch’s St. Louis headquarters: (314) 994-2700
Call Arch’s Charleston, WV headquarters: (304) 760-2400

To allow Arch Coal to destroy Blair Mountain would be to tear out a crucial page of American labor history and burn it. But even more important than the history are the lives of the people living at the foot of this mountain today.

Amanda

For the mountains and for healthy communities,

Amanda Starbuck
Energy & Finance Program Director
Twitter: @DirtyEnergy

the Senate S.1392,Energy Savings&Industrial Competitiveness Act ~~ CONGRESS ~~ the House HR2775,ACA stipulations


capitol21Bipartisan Legislation Would Strengthen Background Checks

At a press conference on Thursday, April 11, 2013, Senators Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Pat Toomey (R-PA) unveiled bipartisan legislation to strengthen and enhance background checks for new purchasers of firearms.  “Failed”

The Senate stands in adjournment until 10:00am Tuesday, September 17, 2013.  Following any Leader remarks, the Senate will be in a period of morning business until noon with Senators permitted to speak therein for up to 10 minutes each with the Majority controlling the first 30 minutes and the Republicans controlling the next 30 minutes.

 Following morning business, the Senate will resume consideration of S.1392, the Energy Savings and Industrial Competitiveness Act.

At 10:00am there will be a moment of silence to pay tribute to the victims of the tragic mass shooting at the Washington Navy Yard.

At 11:00am today the Senate will turn to Executive Session to consider the following nominations:

–          Executive Calendar #175, the nomination of Patricia E. Campbell-Smith, of the District of Columbia, to be a Judge of the United States Court of Federal Claims and;

–          Executive Calendar #176, the nomination of Elaine D. Kaplan, of the District of Columbia, to be a Judge of the United States Court of Federal Claims.

There will be up to 30 minutes for debate prior to votes on confirmation of the nominations. We expect a voice vote on the Campbell-Smith nomination and a roll call vote on the Kaplan nomination.

Following the vote on the Kaplan nomination, the Senate will recess until 2:15pm to allow for the weekly caucus meetings.

When the Senate reconvenes at 2:15pm we will resume consideration of the S.1392, the Energy Efficiency bill. We are trying to reach an agreement on a finite list of amendments to move forward on that legislation. Senator Vitter has an amendment dealing with the Affordable Care Act and certain congressional and administration staff. We would have a side by side or second degree amendment to his amendment. In order to reach an agreement to vote on Vitter’s amendment we would need a finite list of amendments to complete action on the bill.

12:02pm The Senate began a 15 minute roll call vote on confirmation of the nomination of Elaine D. Kaplan, of the District of Columbia, to be a Judge of the United States Court of Federal Claims;

Confirmed: 64-35

The Senate stands in recess until 2:15pm. Following recess, the there will be a period of morning business to allow Senators Udall (CO) and Bennet to talk about the flooding in Colorado.

At 2:30pm, the Senate will resume consideration of S.1392, Energy Efficiency.

WRAP UP

ROLL CALL VOTE

1)      Confirmation of Executive Calendar #176, the nomination of Elaine D. Kaplan, of the District of Columbia, to be a Judge of the United States Court of Federal Claims; Confirmed: 64-35

LEGISLATIVE ITEMS

Began the Rule 14 process of H.R.2775, the No Subsidies without Verification Act.

Began the Rule 14 process of H.R.2009, the Keep the IRS Off Your Health Care Act of 2013.

Began the Rule 14 process of S.1513, the High Technology Jobs Preservation Act of 2013. (Wyden/Murkowski)

Began the Rule 14 process of S.1514, the Saving Coal Jobs Act of 2013. (McConnell)

 

EXECUTIVE ITEMS

Confirmed the following:

Executive Calendar #175, the nomination of Patricia E. Campbell-Smith, of the District of Columbia, to be a Judge of the United States Court of Federal Claims by voice vote.

Executive Calendar #335 Kenneth Allen Polite, Jr. – to be United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Louisiana for the term of four years.

Executive Calendar #336, Jon T. Rymer, of Tennessee, to be Inspector General, Department of Defense.

Executive Calendar #337, Steve A. Linick, of Virginia, to be Inspector General, Department of State.

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Last Floor Action: 9/17
7:30:51 P.M. – SPECIAL ORDER SPEECHES –
The House has concluded all anticipated legislative business and has proceeded
to Special Order speeches.

The next meeting is scheduled for 12:00 p.m. on September 17, 2013

Last Floor Action: 9/17 12:03:08 P.M

. – The Speaker announced that the House do now recess.

The next meeting is scheduled for 2:00 P.M. today.

Last Floor Action: 9/16
2:02:47 P.M. – The Speaker announced that
the House do now adjourn.

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Do it for the CHILDREN!


ThinkProgress War Room

Time to Invest More in Early Childhood Education

Today is a national day of action on early learning, with a broad coalition of groups pushing for significant new investments in early childhood education.

The president proposed historic investments in our kids in his State of the Union speech and budget, including voluntary preschool for all four year-olds. Investments like this are the right thing to do for our kids and for our economy. Here’s five reasons why:

1. Preschool can help combat crime, teen pregnancy, and high school dropout rates. When children have the benefit of a high-quality early childhood education, they make cognitive and social gains that prepare them to start school. These foundational skills allow them to build on their learning and knowledge through school and into adulthood. As a result, a child without an early childhood education is 25 percent more likely to drop out of school, 40 percent more likely to become a teenage parent, and 70 percent more likely to be arrested for a violent crime.

2. Early childhood education has a better return on investment than the stock market. Some policymakers worry about the upfront cost of early childhood education. However, studies show that early childhood education is one of the best investments we can make—and that includes investments in the financial market. The estimated return on investment for high quality early childhood education is ten percent. In comparison, the average return on investment in the stock market is 7.2 percent.

Why does early childhood education pay off so well? Children who participate need fewer services over the course of their lifetime. The benefits show up almost right away, with reduced need for special education and grade retention, which costs taxpayers an estimated $7,500 per child.  Over time, we reap benefits when these children become adults and need fewer public benefits and are less likely to be incarcerated.

3. The U.S. lags behind almost every other country when it comes to preschool, including Mexico, Chile, and Russia. When it comes to access to high-quality preschool, the U.S. is getting beat by virtually every other developed country, including Mexico, Chile, Russia, and New Zealand. Each of these countries—and most of Western Europe and Scandinavia—enroll a greater proportion of four year olds in preschool and invest more in early childhood education relative to the size of their economies. If the U.S. wants to compete in a global market and continue its role as an economic and military superpower, we must keep up with other countries when it comes to early childhood education.

4. Early childhood education is a bipartisan issue. Politicians from both sides of the aisle recognize that when we invest in early childhood education, we improve the lives of children and families and save money for generations to come. That’s why 27 governors mentioned early childhood education in their state of the state addresses and 14 were Republicans. Governors from Alabama, Michigan, Indiana, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia, to name a few, all advocated for expanded access to preschool.

One reason why both liberals and conservatives support early childhood education is that it’s necessary to ensure our country’s economic health and military readiness. In fact, business and military leaders have called on the president and Congress to fund early childhood education.

5. Preschool can save families thousands of dollars in child care costs each year. Early childhood education is an expense that few families can afford. The estimated cost of sending a four year old to a center-based child care ranges from $4,000 per year in Mississippi to $12,000 per year in Massachusetts. For families living below the poverty level with children under five, child care costs constitute 36 percent of a family’s budget each month. In most regions of the country, the cost of child care exceeds every other household expense, including housing, transportation, food, and health care. Few families have access to subsidies to help alleviate the cost of child care; just one in five eligible families receives those benefits.

And while child care is expensive, the quality varies considerably. In many cases, parents are paying for child care that is mediocre at best. In state preschools programs, the states dictate quality standards, such as ensuring that programs are taught by certified teachers with a college degree and mandating a developmentally appropriate curriculum. Thus, children are much more likely to be in high quality settings that are preparing them for school.

You can find even more information on why these investments make sense, enjoy bipartisan support, and have a strong record of success HERE.

You can also find out how much your state would benefit in year one of the president’s proposal HERE.

Congress


Capitol
Capitol (Photo credit: Rollinho)

The Senate stands in adjournment until 9:30am on Wednesday, April 24, 2013.  Following any Leader remarks, the Senate will be in a period of morning business until 10:30am with Senators permitted to speak therein for up to 10 minutes each with the Republicans controlling the first half and the Majority controlling the final half.

 Following morning business, the Senate will proceed to Executive Session to consider the following nominations:

 

–          Executive Calendar #60, the nomination of Jane Kelly, of Iowa, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Eighth Circuit; and

–          Executive Calendar #64, the nomination of Sylvia Mathews Burwell, of West Virginia, to be Director of the Office of Management and Budget.

 

There will be 90 minutes of debate, with time from 10:30 until 11:00am on the Kelly nomination and the time from 11:00am until 12:00 noon on the Burwell nomination. At 12:00 noon, the Senate will proceed to vote on confirmation of the nominations in the order listed. The first vote will be a 15 minute vote and the second vote will be a 10 minute vote.

 

Following the votes, the Senate will resume consideration of the motion to proceed to S.743, the Marketplace Fairness Act of 2013, and immediately vote on adoption of the motion.

At 10:00am the Senate turned to a period of morning business until 10:30am, with the time equally divided. At 10:30am, the Senate will turn to Executive Session to debate the Kelly (30 minutes of debate) and Burwell (60 minutes of debate) nominations.

 

At 12:00 noon, the Senate will proceed to a series of up to 3 roll call votes in relation to the following items:

 

–          Confirmation of Executive Calendar #60, the nomination of Jane Kelly, of Iowa, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Eighth Circuit;

–          Confirmation of Executive Calendar #64, the nomination of Sylvia Mathews Burwell, of West Virginia, to be Director of the Office of Management and Budget; and

–          Adoption of the motion to proceed to S.743, Marketplace Fairness Act.

12:05pm The Senate began a roll call vote on confirmation of Executive Calendar #60, the nomination of Jane Kelly, of Iowa, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Eighth Circuit

Confirmed: 96-0

12:29pm The Senate began a roll call vote on confirmation of Executive Calendar #64, the nomination of Sylvia Mathews Burwell, of West Virginia, to be Director of the Office of Management and Budget (10 minute roll call vote)

Confirmed: 96-0

S.743, the Marketplace Fairness Act of 2013

Adopted: 75-22

The motion to proceed to S.743, Marketplace Fairness Act, was adopted 75-22. Senator Reid then offered the Enzi-Durbin perfecting amendment #741 (Manager’s technical amendment) and filed cloture on the bill. Under the rule, the cloture vote would occur 1 hour after the Senate convenes on Friday.

 

Senator Donnelly is now giving his maiden speech. We will resume consideration of the Marketplace Fairness Act following his remarks.

Senator Durbin offered a second degree amendment #745 (date change) to Enzi amendment #741. Senator Durbin has urged senators with amendments to the bill to come to the floor to talk to the managers about their amendments. He, along with Senator Reid, would like to complete action on the bill before we leave this week.

Senator Toomey asked unanimous consent the Senate take up and pass a bill to provide for sequester replacement. Senator Durbin objected. Senator Durbin then asked consent to take up and pass Calendar #64, S.788, a bill to suspend the fiscal year 2013 sequestration and offset with funds from Overseas Contingency Operations. Senator Toomey objected.

As a result of cloture being filed, the filing deadline for first degree amendments to S.743, Marketplace Fairness Act, is 1pm tomorrow, Thursday, April 25. If cloture is invoked, amendments must be germane and timely filed to be considered in order post-cloture.

ROLL CALL VOTES

1)      Executive Calendar #60, the nomination of Jane Kelly, of Iowa, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Eighth Circuit; Confirmed: 96-0

2)      Executive Calendar #64, the nomination of Sylvia Mathews Burwell, of West Virginia, to be Director of the Office of Management and Budget; Confirmed: 96-0

3)      Adoption of the motion to proceed to S.743, Marketplace Fairness Act; Adopted: 75-22

LEGISLATIVE ITEMS

Adopted S.Res.111, a resolution supporting the goals and ideals of National Safe Digging Month.

 

Adopted S.Res.112, Commending employees of the Senate Post Office, employees of the Sergeant at Arms of the Senate, members of the Capitol Police, and members of the Capitol Hill community for their courage and professionalism following the biochemical attack against the Senate on April 16, 2013.

Adopted S.Res.113, designating April 23, 2013 as “National Adopt a Library Day”.

 

Adopted S.Res.114, a legal counsel resolution regarding U.S. v. Renzi.

 

Began the Rule 14 process of S.799, to provide for a sequester replacement. (Inhofe/Toomey)

Completed the Rule 14 process of S.788, to suspend FY2013 sequestration. (Reid)

 

No additional EXECUTIVE ITEMS

 

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Last Floor Action:
9:31:34 P.M. – The House adjourned. 4/23/13

The next meeting is scheduled for 10:00 a.m. on April 24, 2013.

10:00:24 A.M.   The House convened, starting a new legislative day.
10:00:39 A.M.   The Speaker designated the Honorable Rodney Davis to act as Speaker pro tempore for today.
10:01:02 A.M.   MORNING-HOUR DEBATE – The House proceeded with Morning-Hour Debate. At the conclusion of Morning-Hour, the House will recess until 12:00 p.m. for the start of legislative business.
10:40:09 A.M.   The Speaker announced that the House do now recess. The next meeting is scheduled for 12:00 P.M. today.
12:00:25 P.M.   The House convened, returning from a recess continuing the legislative day of April 24.
12:00:32 P.M.   Today’s prayer was offered by Archbishop Oshagan Choloyan, Armenian Apostolic Church of America, New York, NY
12:02:33 P.M.   The Speaker announced approval of the Journal. Pursuant to clause 1, rule I, the Journal stands approved.
12:02:35 P.M.   PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE – The Chair designated Mr. Valadao to lead the Members in reciting the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag.
12:04:25 P.M.   ONE MINUTE SPEECHES – The House proceeded with one minute speeches, which by direction of the Chair would be limited to 15 per side of the aisle.
12:30:35 P.M.   The Speaker announced that votes on suspensions, if ordered, will be postponed until a time to be announced.
12:30:56 P.M. H.R. 1071 Mr. Bachus moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill. H.R. 1071 — “To specify the size of the precious-metal blanks that will be used in the production of the National Baseball Hall of Fame commemorative coins.”
12:31:13 P.M. H.R. 1071 Considered under suspension of the rules.
12:31:19 P.M. H.R. 1071 DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on H.R. 1071.
12:40:13 P.M. H.R. 1071 On motion to suspend the rules and pass the bill Agreed to by voice vote.
12:40:16 P.M. H.R. 1071 Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
12:40:32 P.M. H.R. 360 Mr. Bachus moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended. H.R. 360 — “To award posthumously a Congressional Gold Medal to Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, and Cynthia Wesley, in recognition of the 50th The four girls killed in the bombing (Clockwis...commemoration of the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church where the 4 little Black girls lost their lives, which served as a catalyst for the Civil Rights Movement.”
12:40:47 P.M. H.R. 360 Considered under suspension of the rules.
12:41:07 P.M. H.R. 360 DEBATE – The House proceeded with forty minutes of debate on H.R. 360.

 

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