1964 – D.C. residents cast their first presidential votes


On November 3, 1964, residents of the District of Columbia cast their ballots in a presidential election for the first time. The passage of the 23rd Amendment in 1961 gave citizens of the nation’s capital the right to vote for a commander in chief and vice president. They went on …read more

Citation Information

Article Title

D.C. residents cast first presidential votes

AuthorHistory.com Editors

Website Name

HISTORY

URL

https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/d-c-residents-cast-first-presidential-votes

Access Date

November 2, 2022

Publisher

A&E Television Networks

Last Updated

October 30, 2020

Original Published Date

November 24, 2009

2014 – One World Trade Center officially opens in New York City, on the site of the Twin Towers


One World Trade Center officially opens in Manhattan on November 3, 2014. The new tower, along with the rest of the World Trade Center complex, replaced the Twin Towers and surrounding complex, which were destroyed by terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001.

As the city and the nation reeled from the attacks, which set into motion the series of U.S-led military operations dubbed the War on Terror, it was decided that the Twin Towers should be replaced by new office buildings, parks, a museum, and a memorial to those who died. In 2002, after cleanup and recovery efforts had concluded, the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation announced a competition to find the chief architect of the new structure. Daniel Libeskind, a Polish-American architect then in charge of a studio in Berlin, won and became the site’s master planner. In reality, however, a number of people and entities, including then-Governor George Pataki, leaseholder Larry Silverstein, and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, wrestled over what would happen to the space commonly referred to as “Ground Zero.”

Watch 9/11 documentaries on HISTORY Vault

Citation Information

Article Title

One World Trade Center officially opens in New York City, on the site of the Twin Towers

AuthorHistory.com Editors

Website Name

HISTORY

URL

https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/one-world-trade-center-officially-opens-in-new-york-city

Access Date

November 2, 2022

Publisher

A&E Television Networks

Last Updated

November 1, 2021

Original Published Date

July 24, 2019

on this day 11/3 1992 – Carol Moseley-Braun became the first African-American woman U.S. senator. 


1507 – Leonardo DaVinci was commissioned by the husband of Lisa Gherardini to paint her. The work is known as the Mona Lisa.

1631 – The Reverend John Eliot arrived in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was the first Protestant minister to dedicate himself to the conversion of Native Americans to Christianity.

1793 – Stephen F. Austin was born. He was the principal founder of Texas.

1796 – John Adams was elected the 2nd U.S. President.

1839 – The first Opium War between China and Britain erupted.

1892 – The first automatic telephone went into service at LaPorte, IN. The device was invented by Almon Strowger.

1896 – Seventy-eight Blacks reported lynched in 1896. blackfacts.com

1900 – The first automobile show in the United States opened at New York’s Madison Square Garden.

1903 – Panama proclaimed its independence from Colombia.

1911 – Chevrolet Motor Car Company was founded by Louis Chevrolet and William C. Durant.

1934 – The first race track in California opened under a new pari-mutuel betting law.

1941 – U.S. Ambassador to Japan John Grew warned that the Japanese may be planning a sudden attack on the U.S.

1952 – Frozen bread was offered for sale for the first time in a supermarket in Chester, NY.

1953 – The Rules Committee of organized baseball restored the sacrifice fly. The rule had not been used since 1939.

1957 – Sputnik II was launched by the Soviet Union. It was the second manmade satellite to be put into orbit and was the first to put an animal into space, a dog named Laika.

1973 – The U.S. launched the Mariner 10 spacecraft. On March 29,

1974 it became the first spacecraft to reach the planet Mercury.

1979 – Five members of the Communist Workers’ Party are shot to death in broad daylight at an anti-Ku Klux Klan rally in Greensboro, NC. Eight others were wounded. 

1986 – The Ash-Shiraa, pro-Syrian Lebanese magazine, first broke the story of U.S. arms sales to Iran to secure the release of seven American hostages. The story turned into the Iran-Contra affair.

1987 – China told the U.S. that it would halt the sale of arms to Iran.

1991 – Israeli and Palestinian representatives held their first-ever face-to-face talks in Madrid, Spain.

1992 – Carol Moseley-Braun became the first African-American woman U.S. senator. 

1994 – Susan Smith of Union, SC, was arrested for drowning her two sons. Nine days earlier Smith had claimed that the children had been abducted by a black carjacker.

1995 – U.S. President Clinton dedicated a memorial at Arlington National Cemetery to the 270 victims of the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103.

1998 – Bob Kane, the creator of Batman, died at the age of 83.

1998 – A state-run newspaper in Iraq urged the country to prepare for to battle “the U.S. monster.”

1998 – Minnesota elected Jesse “The Body” Ventura, a former pro wrestler, as its governor.

2002 – At Kai Tak Airport in Hong Kong, 777 people assembled a 58,435 square foot jigsaw puzzle with 21,600 pieces.

2003 – In Kabul, Afghanistan, a post-Taliban draft constitution was unveiled.

2005 – Walt Disney Pictures released “Chicken Little.” It was the first Disney film completely created with computer animation.

2014 – In New York City, One World Trade Center opened for business.