2014 – One World Trade Center officially opens in New York City, on the site of the Twin Towers


One World Trade Center officially opens in Manhattan on November 3, 2014. The new tower, along with the rest of the World Trade Center complex, replaced the Twin Towers and surrounding complex, which were destroyed by terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001.

As the city and the nation reeled from the attacks, which set into motion the series of U.S-led military operations dubbed the War on Terror, it was decided that the Twin Towers should be replaced by new office buildings, parks, a museum, and a memorial to those who died. In 2002, after cleanup and recovery efforts had concluded, the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation announced a competition to find the chief architect of the new structure. Daniel Libeskind, a Polish-American architect then in charge of a studio in Berlin, won and became the site’s master planner. In reality, however, a number of people and entities, including then-Governor George Pataki, leaseholder Larry Silverstein, and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, wrestled over what would happen to the space commonly referred to as “Ground Zero.”

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Citation Information

Article Title

One World Trade Center officially opens in New York City, on the site of the Twin Towers

AuthorHistory.com Editors

Website Name

HISTORY

URL

https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/one-world-trade-center-officially-opens-in-new-york-city

Access Date

November 2, 2022

Publisher

A&E Television Networks

Last Updated

November 1, 2021

Original Published Date

July 24, 2019