They fought for our vote


NAACP
Just over 50 years ago, African-Americans made up 45% of Mississippi’s population, but fewer than 7% of  Mississippians were registered to vote.In June of 1964, civil rights groups came together to kick off Freedom Summer, a 10-week campaign to dramatically increase the number of registered black voters in the state. More than 1,000 volunteers of all races and colors, from all over the nation, traveled to Mississippi to do this important work.While there, youth volunteers and their black Mississippian supporters suffered unimaginable levels of vitriol and violence, but they did not stop fighting for what was right. In the end, Freedom Summer emerged as a defining moment in the civil rights movement, pushing our country one step closer to the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.The best way we can honor the work, bravery, and sacrifice of the Freedom Summer volunteers is to exercise the right they fought for so diligently.Honor the mission of Freedom Summer by pledging to vote in this year’s midterm election.

Pledge to vote in November
The extremely low levels of black voter registration in the South were fueled by generations of discriminatory elections practices. States were legally able to hold whites-only primaries, collect poll taxes, and administer literacy tests. When legal barriers weren’t enough, lynchings and bombings—threats and fulfilled promises—kept even more African-Americans away from the polls.

Fifty years later, legislators are attempting to take us back toward 1964, weakening the VRA, making it ever harder for the poor and people of color to have their voices heard at the polls.

Don’t allow these lawmakers to roll back history. They can only win and keep their seats in office when people like you and I stay home during midterm elections.

Raise your voice against those who seek to violate civil rights and human rights. Make a pledge to vote this November:

http://action.naacp.org/My-Vote-2014

In solidarity,

Lorraine C. Miller
Interim President and CEO
NAACP

 

the Senate ~~ CONGRESS 7/21 ~~ the House


capitolphonelines

Republicans tell Women, Hobby Lobby is not just a Corporation but People too & MORE important than their Health Care CHOICES  56-43

The Senate stands adjourned until 2:00pm on Monday, July 21, 2014.

Following any leader remarks, there will be a period of morning business until 5:30pm, with senators permitted to speak therein for up to 10 minutes each and with the time equally divided and controlled between the two Leaders, or their designees.

At 5:30pm, the Senate will proceed to Executive Session and vote on confirmation of the following nominations:

  1. Executive Calendar #849 Julie E. Carnes, of Georgia, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Eleventh Circuit
  2. Executive Calendar #789, Michael Anderson Lawson, of California, for the rank of Ambassador during his tenure of service as Representative of the United States of America on the Council of the International Civil Aviation Organization
  3. Executive Calendar #537 Eunice S. Reddick, of the District of Columbia, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Republic of Niger

 

We expect a roll call vote on the Carnes nomination and voice votes on the Lawson and Reddick nominations.

5:31pm The Senate began a 15 minute roll call vote on confirmation of Executive Calendar #849 Julie E. Carnes, of Georgia, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Eleventh Circuit;

Confirmed: 94-0

 

Next—voice votes expected:

 

  1. Executive Calendar #789, Michael Anderson Lawson, of California, for the rank of Ambassador during his tenure of service as Representative of the United States of America on the Council of the International Civil Aviation Organization
  2. Executive Calendar #537 Eunice S. Reddick, of the District of Columbia, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Republic of Niger

The Senate confirmed the following nominations by voice votes:

–          Executive Calendar #789, Michael Anderson Lawson, of California, for the rank of Ambassador during his tenure of service as Representative of the United States of America on the Council of the International Civil Aviation Organization

–          Executive Calendar #537 Eunice S. Reddick, of the District of Columbia, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Republic of Niger

There will be no further roll call votes today.

Senator Reid filed cloture on the motion to proceed to Calendar #453, S.2569, the Bring Jobs Home Act. The cloture vote is expected to occur Wednesday morning. Another message will be sent when the vote is scheduled.

WRAP UP

Roll Call Votes

  1. Confirmation of Executive Calendar #849 Julie E. Carnes, of Georgia, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Eleventh Circuit

 

Legislative Business

Adopted S.Res.509Honoring the extraordinary and courageous life of Mattie Stepanek

 

Senator Reid filed cloture on the motion to proceed to Calendar #453, S.2569, the Bring Jobs Home Act.

 

Executive Business

 

The Senate confirmed the following nominations by voice votes:

–        Executive Calendar #789, Michael Anderson Lawson, of California, for the rank of Ambassador during his tenure of service as Representative of the United States of America on the Council of the International Civil Aviation Organization; and

–        Executive Calendar #537 Eunice S. Reddick, of the District of Columbia, to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Republic of Niger.

============================================

Last Floor Action: 7/18
11:03:12 A.M. – The Speaker announced that the House do now adjourn pursuant to a previous special order.

The next meeting is scheduled for 12:00 p.m. on July 22, 2014.