Endangered Fin Whales Are Once Again Facing a Season Of Slaughter In Iceland


NRDC (Natural Resources Defense Council)For two years, Iceland has given endangered fin whales a break.

But the Icelandic whaling company Hvalur just announced plans to resume hunting fin whales in June, with the highest quota in decades.

Help us raise an outcry and stop the slaughter — send a quick message of protest to Icelandic President Guðni Th. Jóhannesson.

Since 2008, Hvalur has shipped more than 8,800 metric tons of whale products to Japan, where they’ve been turned into dog treats and sushi, generating a global outcry from consumers.

And now Hvalur is trying to turn fin whale meat, blubber, and bones into iron supplements and other medicinal or food products. This is just a trumped-up excuse to keep fin whaling alive. And it is simply unacceptable.

Iceland is one of only three countries — the others are Norway and Japan — that continues to hunt and trade whales and whale products commercially, in defiance of the International Whaling Commission’s global moratorium on whaling.

During Hvalur’s last hunt in 2015, the company killed a record 155 fin whales. Now, that number could be 209 — and potentially even more.

These new quotas not only flout international law — they fly in the face of public opposition to whaling and support for the protection of fin whales.

Make your voice heard today — help save Iceland’s fin whales.

Pressure from NRDC and people like you has successfully persuaded food industry leaders to stop buying seafood from Icelandic companies tied to whaling.

But now we’re going to need support from tens of thousands of passionate NRDC members and activists around the world to help us put an end to this horrendous practice once and for all.

Action is urgently needed. Speak out to help generate a wave of international opposition and protect Iceland’s fin whales.

Thank you for all that you do.

Sincerely,
 
Rhea Suh
President, NRDC

P.S. Read more about Iceland’s plans to resume hunting fin whales in a blog on NRDC.org.

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