Easter Sunday: Naturally Dyeing Easter Eggs


Not only will you save some money by making your own dye, but you’ll also discover how easy it is to store extra dye in your fridge to save for periodic egg decorating sessions throughout the Easter season. You’ll also need an empty egg carton, strainer, gloves,  white vinegar and salt.

How to Naturally Dye Easter Eggs

Each dye color requires the same process—you just need to substitute the final ingredient to change the color.

Bring 1 quart of water, 1 tablespoon of salt, 2 tablespoons of vinegar, and 2 tablespoons of the respective fruit, vegetable, or spice (to create the color) to a boil.

Let simmer for 30 minutes, and then remove pot from burner. Be sure to strain the dye, and let sit until it’s room temperature before dipping your eggs.

For dark blue: Use blueberries.
For light blue: Use red cabbage.
For beige: Use coffee.
For orange: Use onions.
For yellow: Use saffron or carrot turmeric.
For green: Use parsley or spinach.
For purple: Use red wine.
For pink: Use beets.

Save the chart as a handy egg color guide.

resource: countryliving.com

 

Happy Easter …history of


Easter, which celebrates Jesus Christ’s resurrection from the dead, is Christianity’s most important holiday. It has been called a moveable feast because it doesn’t fall on a set date every year, as most holidays do.

Instead, Christian churches in the West celebrate Easter on the first Sunday following the full moon after the vernal equinox on March 21. Therefore, Easter is observed anywhere between March 22 and April 25 every year. Orthodox Christians use the Julian calendar to calculate when Easter will occur and typically celebrate the holiday a week or two after the Western churches, which follow the Gregorian calendar.

The exact origins of this religious feast day’s name are unknown. Some sources claim the word Easter is derived from Eostre, a Teutonic goddess of spring and fertility. Other accounts trace Easter to the Latin term hebdomada alba, or white week, an ancient reference to Easter week and the white clothing donned by people who were baptized during that time. Through a translation error, the term later appeared as esostarum in Old High German, which eventually became Easter in English. In Spanish, Easter is known as Pascua; in French, Paques. These words are derived from the Greek and Latin Pascha or Pasch, for Passover. Jesus‘ crucifixion and resurrection occurred after he went to Jerusalem to celebrate Passover (or Pesach in Hebrew), the Jewish festival commemorating the ancient Israelites’ exodus from slavery in Egypt. Pascha eventually came to mean Easter.

Did You Know?

Over 90 million chocolate Easter bunnies are made each year

Easter is really an entire season of the Christian church year, as opposed to a single-day observance. Lent, the 40-day period leading up to Easter Sunday, is a time of reflection and penance and represents the 40 days that Jesus spent alone in the wilderness before starting his ministry, a time in which Christians believe he survived various temptations by the devil. The day before Lent, known as Mardi Gras or Fat Tuesday, is a last hurrah of food and fun before the fasting begins. The week preceding Easter is called Holy Week and includes Maundy Thursday, which commemorates Jesus’ last supper with his disciples; Good Friday, which honors the day of his crucifixion; and Holy Saturday, which focuses on the transition between the crucifixion and resurrection. The 50-day period following Easter Sunday is called Eastertide and includes a celebration of Jesus’ ascension into heaven.

In addition to Easter’s religious significance, it also has a commercial side, as evidenced by the mounds of jelly beans and marshmallow chicks that appear in stores each spring. As with Christmas, over the centuries various folk customs and pagan traditions, including Easter eggs, bunnies, baskets and candy, have become a standard part of this holy holiday.

History.com

Juanita Charles ~ Tennessee SD-22


Juanita CharlesA veteran and business owner, Juanita Charles has spent her life advocating for others in her community. She understands and is ready to fight for what all middle-class families want: A life of dignity and security.

  • A retired longtime service member of the Army and Tennessee National Guard who understands the issues veterans face firsthand
  • Brought her own military experience to bear when working to help veterans making the transition from military to civilian life
  • Prioritizing rural broadband access in order to expand opportunities for business, education, and quality of life.

Use of Juanita Charles’s military affiliation and service does not imply endorsement by the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense

A Veteran for Change