1865 – U.S. Secretary of State William Seward issued a statement verifying the ratification of the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.


PictureDec 18, 1865 – U.S. Secretary of State William Seward issued a statement verifying the ratification of the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The amendment abolished slavery with the declaration: “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.”

December 18, 1865 – Secretary of State William Seward issued a statement verifying the ratification of the 13th Amendment.

· The first bill introducing the anti-slavery 13th Amendment was introduced into the House of Representatives by James Mitchell Ashley (Ohio), on December 14, 1864, nearly a year after President Lincoln issued the final executive order for the Emancipation Proclamation.

· The Senate Judiciary Committee drafted the final language for the 13th Amendment. The language of amendment is simple. It is written in two sections.

· Section I of the 13th Amendment states; “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.”

· Section II of the 13th Amendment states; “Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.”

The 13th Amendment changed the way Americans live today. Mainly because the 13th amendment, became an instrument for Americans to change their views on African-Americans. More importantly, the 13th amendment became a way to stop slavery. The 13th Amendment opened many possibilities not only to African-Americans, but also to other races who are now living in America.The 13th Amendment set a new perception that everyone is equal. That everyone has the right to live here in America equally. After all these years, the 13th Amendment still lives with us. It still lives inside the hearts of everyone that was affected by it. I believe that if it weren’t for the 13th Amendment, our lives are probably very different now. Slavery will continue to spread, wars will continue to have no end. Imagine not having the 13th Amendment, what do you think our lives would be now?

Resource: thirthteenthamendmentnhd.weebly.com

December is Universal Human Rights Month


Wethepeople

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on December 10, 1948 without a dissenting vote. It is the first multinational declaration mentioning human rights by name, and the human rights movement has largely adopted it as a charter.