1974 – Violence occurred on the opening day of classes in Boston, MA, due to opposition to court-ordered school “busing.”


Valerie Banks was the only student to show up for her geography class at South Boston High School on the first day of court-ordered busing, Sept. 12, 1974. (AP)Valerie Banks was the only student to show up for her geography class at South Boston High School on the first day of court-ordered busing, Sept. 12, 1974. (AP)

First of two parts. Here’s Part 2. Note: Report contains some offensive language.

African-American students board a school bus outside South Boston High School on Sept. 12, 1974 -- the first day of school and the first day of court-ordered busing. (AP)
African-American students board a school bus outside South Boston High School on Sept. 12, 1974 — the first day of school and the first day of court-ordered busing. (AP)

BOSTON — With Boston public school students back in class, we recall a very different start to school 40 years ago. Then, classes began a week late to give students, schools and the police extra time to prepare for the first day of court-ordered desegregation.

Earlier that summer of 1974, federal District Court Judge W. Arthur Garrity ruled that the Boston School Committee had deliberately segregated the city’s schools, creating one system for blacks and another for whites — separate, unequal and unconstitutional.

The remedy to achieve racial balance and desegregate schools was busing. Some 18,000 black and white students were ordered to take buses to schools outside of their neighborhoods.

‘The Words. The Spit.’

Here’s how The Boston Globe headlined that first day of court-ordered busing: “Boston Schools Desegregated, Opening Day Generally Peaceful”. The headline was reassuring, if not exactly accurate. It was only Phase 1 of the federal desegregation plan. Just 59 of 201 schools were desegregated that day, and it was far from peaceful at South Boston High School.

Southie was ground zero for anti-busing rage. Hundreds of white demonstrators — children and their parents — pelted a caravan of 20 school buses carrying students from nearly all-black Roxbury to all-white South Boston. The police wore riot gear.

“I remember riding the buses to protect the kids going up to South Boston High School,” Jean McGuire, who was a bus safety monitor, recalled recently. “And the bricks through the window. Signs hanging out those buildings, ‘Nigger Go Home.’ Pictures of monkeys. The words. The spit. People just felt it was all right to attack children.”

One of those children was Regina Williams.

“I had no idea what to expect [with] this busing thing,” Williams said. “I didn’t know anything about South Boston. I didn’t know anything about, you know, they didn’t like us. I didn’t know anything that was in store for us. But when we got there, it was like a war zone.

“I came back and I told my mom, and I’ll never forget, I said, ‘Ma, I am not going back to that school unless I have a gun.’ At 14 years old. I am not going back to that school.”

To read more … wbur.org/news

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on this day 9/12


1609 – English explorer Henry Hudson sailed down what is now known as the Hudson River.

1814 – During the War of 1812, the Battle of North Point was fought in Maryland.

1866 – “The Black Crook” opened in New York City. It was the first American burlesque show.

1873 – The first practical typewriter was sold to customers.

1878 – Patent litigation involving the Bell Telephone Company against Western Union Telegraph Company and Elisha Gray began. The issues were over various telephone patents.

1914 – The first battle of Marne ended when the allied forces stopped the German offensive in France.

1916 – Adelina and August Van Buren finished the first successful transcontinental motorcycle tour to be attempted by two women. They started in New York City on July 5, 1916.

1918 – During World War I, At the Battle of St. Mihiel, U.S. Army personnel operate tanks for the first time. The tanks were French-built.

1922 – The Episcopal Church removed the word “Obey” from the bride’s section of wedding vows. 

1928 – Katharine Hepburn made her stage debut in the play “The Czarina.” Four years later she made her film debut in “A Bill of Divorcement.”

1938 – In a speech, Adolf Hitler demanded self-determination for the Sudeten Germans in Czechoslovakia.

1940 – The Lascaux paintings were discovered in France. The cave paintings were 17,000 years old and were some of the best examples of art from the Paleolithic period.

1943 – During World War II, Benito Mussolini was taken by German paratroopers from the Italian government that was holding him.

1944 – U.S. Army troops entered Germany, near Trier, for the first time during World War II.

1953 – U.S. Senator John F. Kennedy married Jacqueline Lee Bouvier.

1953 – Nikita Krushchev was elected as the first secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

1954 – “Lassie” made its television debut on CBS. The last show aired on September 12, 1971.

1963 – The last episode of “Leave it to Beaver” was aired. The show had debuted on October 4, 1957.

1966 – “Family Affair” premiered on CBS television.

1974 – Violence occurred on the opening day of classes in Boston, MA, due to opposition to court-ordered school “busing.”

1974 – Emperor Haile Selassie was taken out of power by Ethiopia’s military after ruling for 58 years.

1977 – South African anti-apartheid activist Stephen Biko died at the age of 30. The student leader died while in police custody which triggered an international outcry.

1979 – Carl Yastrzemski of the Boston Red Sox became the first American League player to get 3,000 career hits and 400 career home runs.

1983 – Arnold Schwarzenegger became a U.S. citizen. He had emigrated from Austria 14 years earlier.

1984 – Michael Jordan signed a seven-year contract to play basketball with the Chicago Bulls.

1984 – Dwight Gooden (New York) Mets set a rookie strikeout record with his 251st strikeout of the season.

1991 – The space shuttle Discovery took off on a mission to deploy an observatory that was to study the Earth’s ozone layer. 

1992 – Police in Peru captured Shining Path founder Abimael Guzman.

1992 – Dr. Mae Carol Jemison became the first African-American woman in space. She was the payload specialist aboard the space shuttle Endeavor. Also onboard were Mission Specialist N. Jan Davis and Air Force Lieutenant Colonel Mark C. Lee. They were the first married couple to fly together in space. And, Mamoru Mohri became the first Japanese person to fly into space. 

2009 – Steve Jobs announced that Apple’s iTunes had 88% of the legal U.S. music download marke

1940 – Lascaux cave paintings discovered


brewminate.com image

Near Montignac, France, a collection of prehistoric cave paintings are discovered by four teenagers who stumbled upon the ancient artwork after following their dog down a narrow entrance into a cavern. The 15,000- to 17,000-year-old paintings, consisting mostly of animal representations, are among the finest examples of art from the Upper Paleolithic period.

First studied by the French archaeologist Henri-Édouard-Prosper Breuil, the Lascaux grotto consists of a main cavern 66 feet wide and 16 feet high. The walls of the cavern are decorated with some 600 painted and drawn animals and symbols and nearly 1,500 engravings. The pictures depict in excellent detail numerous types of animals, including horses, red deer, stags, bovines, felines, and what appear to be mythical creatures. There is only one human figure depicted in the cave: a bird-headed man with an erect phallus. Archaeologists believe that the cave was used over a long period of time as a center for hunting and religious rites.

For the complete article

history.com

Citation Information

Article Title

Lascaux cave paintings discovered

AuthorHistory.com Editors

Website Name

HISTORY

URL

https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/lascaux-cave-paintings-discovered

Access Date

September 12, 2022

Publisher

A&E Television Networks

Last Updated

September 9, 2021

Original Published Date

November 24, 2009