Tag Archives: BeaSeedforChange

In the Library: “Einstein on Race and Racism” by Jerome and Taylor


TumblrAlbertEnsteina0630a335c22bfc39dac14f5bdde1dfd Did Einstein speak about racism at Lincoln University?

Here is the text of the email:   Here’s something you probably don’t know about Albert Einstein.

In 1946, the Nobel Prize-winning physicist traveled to Lincoln University in Pennsylvania, the alma mater of Langston Hughes and Thurgood Marshall and the first school in America to grant college degrees to blacks.

At Lincoln, Einstein gave a speech in which he called racism “a disease of white people,” and added, “I do not intend to be quiet about it.” He also received an honorary degree and gave a lecture on relativity to Lincoln students.
In fact, many significant details are missing from the numerous studies of Einstein’s life and work, most of them having to do with Einstein’s opposition to racism and his relationships with African Americans.

Einstein continued to support progressive causes through the 1950s, when the pressure of anti-Communist witch hunts made it dangerous to do so. Another example of Einstein using his prestige to help a prominent African American occurred in 1951, when the 83-year-old W.E.B. Du Bois, a founder of the NAACP, was indicted by the federal government for failing to register as a “foreign agent” as a consequence of circulating the pro-Soviet Stockholm Peace Petition. Einstein offered to appear as a character witness for Du Bois, which convinced the judge to drop the case.
In the wake of the monumental effort to digitize Einstein’s life and genius for the masses, let’s hope that more of us will acknowledge Einstein’s greatness as a champion of human and civil rights for African-Americans as one of his greatest contributions to the world.

Origins:   The e-mail reproduced above is an excerpt from a 2007 Harvard University Gazette article about a talk given by Fred Jerome and Rodger Taylor, authors of the 2006 book Einstein on Race and Racism. As related in that article, Jerome and Taylor undertook their effort in order to “recognize and correct many significant details missing from the numerous studies of Einstein’s life and work, most of them having to do with Einstein’s opposition to racism and his relationships with African Americans:

Nearly fifty years after his death, Albert Einstein remains one of America’s foremost cultural icons. A thicket of materials, ranging from scholarly to popular, have been written, compiled, produced, and published about his life and his teachings. Among the ocean of Einsteinia — scientific monographs, biographies, anthologies, bibliographies, calendars, postcards, posters, and Hollywood films — however, there is a peculiar void when it comes to the connection that the brilliant scientist had with the African American community. Virtually nowhere is there any mention of his relationship with Paul Robeson, despite Einstein’s close friendship with him, or W.E.B. Du Bois, despite Einstein’s support for him.
This unique book is the first to bring together a wealth of writings by Einstein on the topic of race. Although his activism in this area is less well known than his efforts on behalf of international peace and scientific cooperation, he spoke out vigorously against racism both in the United States and around the world.

In May 1946, Einstein made a rare public appearance outside of Princeton, New Jersey (where he lived and worked in the latter part of his life), when he traveled to the campus of Pennsylvania’s Lincoln University, the United States’ first degree-granting black university, to take part in a ceremony conferring upon him the honorary degree of doctor of laws. Prior to accepting that degree, he delivered a ten-minute speech to the assembled audience in which he called upon the United States to take a leading role in preventing another world war and denounced the practice of segregation. Because mainstream U.S. newspapers reported little or nothing about the event, a full transcript of Einstein’s speech that day does not exist — the only existing record of his words is a few excerpts pieced together from quotes reproduced in coverage by the black press:

The only possibility of preventing war is to prevent the possibility of war. International peace can be achieved only if every individual uses all of his power to exert pressure on the United States to see that it takes the leading part in world government.
The United Nations has no power to prevent war, but it can try to avoid another war. The U.N. will be effective only if no one neglects his duty in his private environment. If he does, he is responsible for the death of our children in a future war.
My trip to this institution was in behalf of a worthwhile cause.

There is a separation of colored people from white people in the United States. That separation is not a disease of colored people. It is a disease of white people. I do not intend to be quiet about it.
The situation of mankind today is like that of a little child who has a sharp knife and plays with it. There is no effective defense against the atomic bomb … It can not only destroy a city but it can destroy the very earth on which that city stood.

As the authors of “Einstein on Race and Racism” noted, Einstein’s comments about segregation at Lincoln University reflected his own experiences in both his native Germany and his adopted home in the United States and were part of a pattern of his attempting to ameliorate the effects of discrimination:

According to Jerome and Taylor, Einstein’s statements at Lincoln were by no means an isolated case. Einstein, who was Jewish, was sensitized to racism by the years of Nazi-inspired threats and harassment he suffered during his tenure at the University of Berlin. Einstein was in the United States when the Nazis came to power in 1933, and, fearful that a return to Germany would place him in mortal danger, he decided to stay, accepting a position at the recently founded Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J. He became an American citizen in 1940.

But while Einstein may have been grateful to have found a safe haven, his gratitude did not prevent him from criticizing the ethical shortcomings of his new home.
“Einstein realized that African Americans in Princeton were treated like Jews in Germany,” said Taylor. “The town was strictly segregated. There was no high school that blacks could go to until the 1940s.”
Einstein’s response to the racism and segregation he found in Princeton (Paul Robeson, who was born in Princeton, called it “the northernmost town in the South”) was to cultivate relationships in the town’s African-American community. Jerome and Taylor interviewed members of that community who still remember the white-haired, disheveled figure of Einstein strolling through their streets, stopping to chat with the inhabitants, and handing out candy to local children.
One woman remembered that Einstein paid the college tuition of a young man from the community. Another said that he invited Marian Anderson to stay at his home when the singer was refused a room at the Nassau Inn.

Too many Black families … a repost


 It’s a time of celebration and joy, but every year there are too many Black families who have empty seats around their holiday dinners.

Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, Tanesha Anderson, John Crawford, and many, many more.

But there’s a vibrant movement on the streets demanding that our country value and protect Black lives, and it’s forcing many Americans — particularly our elected officials — to wake up to the realities of everyday violence against Black people.  

We’re in the middle of a transformative moment, and ColorOfChange has bold plans for 2015.

We are going to:

  1. Strengthen the police accountability work we’ve spear-headed throughout 2014. From ensuring Darren Wilson, Daniel Pantaleo, and other police officers are held fully accountable, to securing nationwide structural reforms addressing discriminatory police violence, there’s a lot to be done.
  2. Lift up the voices of our 1 million members to fight back against the new right-wing Congress. The Republicans who now control both houses are determined to pass legislation that will put our communities in harms way. And we’re determined to hold them accountable.
  3. Continue to combat toxic media representations of Black folks and the movements for justice springing up everywhere.
  4. Keep our fingers on the country’s pulse, ready to jump on rapid response moments and influence the national dialogue.

…and there’s a lot more in the pipeline.

Make a $1 holiday donation today to strengthen ColorOfChange’s civil rights campaigns this coming year. (Or give whatever you can.)

Every donation you make, every dollar you give, makes a BIG difference. Our small staff will stretch it out and ensure it has a real impact in 2015.

Thanks and peace,

–Rashad, Arisha, Matt, Bhavik, and the ColorOfChange team

My son was shot and killed — now I’m taking on the NRA


DONATE NOW

My son was shot and killed at UC Santa Barbara in May of this year.

Why did Chris die? He died because of craven, irresponsible politicians and the NRA. I said it the day after my son was murdered, and sadly it’s still true today.

What has changed is that millions of Americans like you have stepped up to demand more of our country and its elected officials: Not. One. More.

And it’s working. Here in California, with the help of Everytown, we passed a law that will temporarily suspend somebody’s access to guns if they’re found to be a threat to themselves or others — somebody like the man who killed my son. Everytown can take winning strategies like this all across the country, but only with your support.

I’m asking you to join me in supporting Everytown with a year-end gift of $5 or more. With your support, we can save lives. Please join this fight before Wednesday’s end-of-year deadline.

Everytown is doing something no one else has ever done before. I’ve seen the passion that powers this movement up close. I’ve shared hugs and tears with others whose lives have been turned upside down by gun violence.

Everytown has given me a chance to share Chris’s story and a platform from which I can work so that fewer parents have to experience this pain.

Our work is fueled by gun violence survivors, moms, dads, and concerned citizens — and it’s backed by cutting edge research and policy analysis. Because of this movement, the NRA is losing its grip on our country’s state houses.

Help us move forward in 2015. Lives depend on it. I’m asking you to show your support with a year-end donation of $5 or more right now — before the Wednesday night deadline:

https://donate.everytown.org/donate/2015-NOM-donate6

As the father of a young person killed with a gun, I know that it’s not enough to just want change. We must work hard and keep the pressure on in 2015.

Thank you for your care and support,

Richard Martinez

Richard and Chris Martinez

Asa movement of Americans fighting for common-sense gun policies, we depend on contributions from supporters like you to fund important work toreduce gun violence.Paid for by Everytown for Gun Safety Action Fund. Contributions to Everytown for Gun Safety Action Fund are not tax-deductible.

 

Genocide in Darfur


 

Accused of leading a horrific genocide in Darfur, Omar al-Bashir has escaped arrest for 6 years. But today, a South African court could finally bring him to justice. Click now to call on South Africa to arrest al-Bashir, bring him to trial, and finally give Darfur’s victims what they deserve — we may not get another chance to catch him:

Sign the Petition
Dear friends,Sudan’s army and militia terrorized the population of Darfur for years. They murdered the men. They raped girls in front of their parents. And they’ve escaped justice. Until now.Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir oversaw it all and is one of the world’s most wanted men, charged with a horrific genocide. But for 6 years no one has succeeded in locking him up. Now is our chance — he’s in South Africa and a court has ordered that he’s not allowed to leave until it decides, in just hours, if he should be arrested.South Africa’s ruling ANC party has already protested against arrest and could pressure the court to give in. But a massive outcry can ensure they stay out of it: this is a legal decision, not a political one. South Africa should arrest al-Bashir and either try him for genocide, or send him to the International Criminal Court. Click now and help finally get justice for the people of Darfur:https://secure.avaaz.org/en/bashir_south_africa_loc/?biEWLbb&v=60322
Dear friends,Sudan’s army and militia terrorized the population of Darfur for years. They murdered the men. They raped girls in front of their parents. And they’ve escaped justice. Until now.Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir oversaw it all and is one of the world’s most wanted men, charged with a horrific genocide. But for 6 years no one has succeeded in locking him up. Now is our chance — he’s in South Africa and a court has ordered that he’s not allowed to leave until it decides, in just hours, if he should be arrested.South Africa’s ruling ANC party has already protested against arrest and could pressure the court to give in. But a massive outcry can ensure they stay out of it: this is a legal decision, not a political one. South Africa should arrest al-Bashir and either try him for genocide, or send him to the International Criminal Court. Click now and help finally get justice for the people of Darfur:https://secure.avaaz.org/en/bashir_south_africa_loc/?biEWLbb&v=60322Troops under al-Bashir’s command in Darfur have spent years attacking and destroying villages, chasing survivors into the dessert, surrounding refugee camps, killing almost 500,000 and uprooting millions of civilians from land they occupied for centuries. When applying for a warrant for his arrest, the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC) said clearly that al-Bashir’s “intent was genocide” and that he wanted to erase the history of an entire people. 

The ICC is still young and because of political maneuvers, al-Bashir has avoided arrest in several countries over the years. Some — including the ANC — have criticized the court for focusing on crimes in Africa. But most of the cases at the ICC were brought forward by the countries themselves and Sudan is one of just two cases where the Security Council managed to agree to bring perpetrators to the court. And when it comes to crimes as horrific as those in Darfur, its justice that should matter, not politics.

The law is clear — South Africa is a member of the ICC and is required to cooperate with the arrest warrant. The ANC already tried to give al-Bashir immunity and political pressure could lead the court to give in, but a massive global outcry could create a media wave strong enough to keep politics out. Click now to show the South African government that the world expects justice:

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/bashir_south_africa_loc/?biEWLbb&v=60322

For international law to work, there can’t be loopholes for international criminals. For there to be justice, our governments must put aside politics and act in the interests of humanity. Our community can show the way and help ensure that Darfur’s victims finally get the justice they deserve.With hope and determination,
Danny, Alice, Emma, Mia, Mike, Nic, and the rest of the Avaaz teamSOURCES
South Africa court blocks Sudan’s Bashir from leaving (Al Jazeera), http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2015/06/sudan-bashir-travels-africa-icc-warrant-150614045917841.htmlICC Prosecutor presents case against Sudanese President, Hassan Ahmad al-Bashir (ICC), http://icc-cpi.int/en_menus/icc/situations%20and%20cases/situations/situation%20icc%200205/press%20r…South Africa’s ANC says International Criminal Court “no longer useful” (Reuters), http://af.reuters.com/article/topNews/idAFKBN0OU0NY20150614

10th Annual Benefit GALA : Skating with THE STARS In Harlem


WordPressMery&MaksDancetumblr_nh9hk0OCRQ1rx3a0fo1_500

 click on image for a better look

This Show is at a NEW Venue !

Check it out !!! click on the link below

Thanks to TSL for posting this …

The Skating Lesson | Facebook