Tag Archives: Illinois

New Rules …


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40,000 New State Rules

Starting on Jan. 1

Greg Toppo, USATODAY

If you’re a pale 17-year-old in Illinois, get your indoor tanning sessions in now. Starting Wednesday, they’re strictly forbidden.

A new state law takes effect Jan. 1 that bans anyone under 18 from using tanning salons in the Land of Lincoln. Illinois becomes the sixth state to keep teens out of the facilities, part of a growing trend of regulating tanning facilities to help reduce the risk of skin cancer, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), a Denver-based group that tracks lawmaking.

STORY: Minn. starts to test aid recipients for drugs STORY: Calif. law to require 3 feet between car, bike

The new measure is one of an estimated 40,000 new laws, regulations and resolutions approved by state legislatures in 2013, many of which take effect Jan. 1. Among them:

Arkansas voters must now show a photo ID at polling places, while Virginia voters for the first time will be able to register online.

• In Colorado, 16-year-olds will be able to pre-register to vote, but must still wait until they’re 18 to vote.

California students must be allowed to play school sports and use school bathrooms “consistent with their gender identity,” regardless of their birth identity.

• In Oregon, new mothers will now be able to take their placentas home from the hospital — some experts say ingesting it has positive health benefits. Another new state law bans smoking in motor vehicles when children are present.

Minimum-wage increases take effect in four northeastern states: Connecticut’s rises to $8.70 an hour; New Jersey’s to $8.25; and New York‘s and Rhode Island’s to $8. In nine other states, the minimum wage rises automatically because it’s indexed to inflation.

Perhaps most significantly, Colorado adults age 21 or older will be able on Wednesday to buy up to an ounce of marijuana for recreational use from a state-licensed retail store. Marijuana advocates expect many of the new stores to be up and running by then, and observers say the new Colorado regulations are a sign of things to come.

“I think state legislatures will be faced with the marijuana issue” in 2014, says Jane Carroll Andrade, NCSL’s spokeswoman.

In Washington state, regulators are combing through more than 2,000 applications for similar stores after voters approved a similar measure in 2012, says Paul Armentano, deputy director of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML). He expects the first Washington stores to open in a few months.

“Other states are watching Colorado and Washington because it will continue to come up,” Andrade says.

Armentano, who likens these developments to the state-led reversal of Prohibition in the 1930s, says a dozen states are due to debate marijuana legalization measures in the coming year or so. “The genie’s out of the bottle and it’s simply not going back in.”

Many new state laws take effect 90 days after they’re signed, but a few states, like California, Colorado, Illinois and Oregon, get extra attention this time of year because traditionally many laws in these states take effect on Jan. 1.

As a result, life changes a bit more radically for Illinois residents each new year: On Wednesday, in addition to the tanning measure, they’ll find that they can now return a pet or be reimbursed for veterinary costs if an illness was not disclosed by the seller. So-called “lemon pets” laws already exist in 21 states, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association.

 in Illinois: Anyone who flicks a cigarette butt on a street or sidewalk could be fined at least $50 for littering; police must receive training on the psychological and physiological effects of stun guns, and penalties are now tougher for inciting a violent flash mob or riot via social media.

Illinois also becomes the 13th state to prohibit handheld cellphones while driving. Meanwhile, school districts on Jan. 1 will be able to install cameras on school buses to photograph drivers who pass them when buses are stopped. And school-based sex education must include information about both abstinence and contraception.

Illinois is also home to tough new laws prohibiting unmanned aerial drones. Come Wednesday, it’ll be illegal to use a drone to interfere with hunters or fishermen — and police must get a warrant to use a drone for surveillance, except in cases of terrorism or if a suspect is fleeing a crime scene. Even with the warrant, police must destroy information gathered within 30 days unless it’s linked to a crime, says Ed Yohnka of the American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois.

Lawmakers in both parties overwhelmingly passed the new surveillance prohibition, he says. “They understood that it was something that could occur in the relatively near future, and so there was a desire to get on top of it.”

Contributing: The Associated Press and Reuters

What’s new Jan. 1

A sample of other state laws taking effect Jan. 1:

Colorado: Drivers will see a new annual $50 fee for plug-in electric cars.  Colorado is one of several states looking to capture revenue from alternative fuel, electric and hybrid vehicles.•

Connecticut: New gun-control laws in the aftermath of the school shooting in Newtown include mandatory registration of all assault weapons and large-capacity ammunition magazines bought before April 2013, and creation of a statewide registry that will track parolees whose crimes involved weapons.•

Delaware: Sale, possession or distribution of shark fins prohibited.•

Florida: Expanded early voting.•

Maine: Becomes the 48th state to require a check-off for organ donation on driver’s licenses to promote organ donation.•

Oregon: Privately run websites that feature police mug shots must take down photos for free if subjects can show they were not guilty or that charges were dropped.•

Rhode Island: Becomes the eighth state to enact a so-called “ban the box” law that prohibits prospective employers from inquiring into an applicant’s criminal history on written job applications.

Los Angeles start their grocery bag ban – gender id and bathrooms

Illinois :  organizing a violent flash mob is banned/could be a felony

NC: • Owners of plug-in electric vehicles must pay a $100 registration fee in addition to any other fees -• Health care facilities that perform mammography exams must report breast density information to patients

California: Homeless youth are eligible to receive food stamps. The previous law had a minimum wage requirement.

Delaware: Delaware is the latest in a growing number of states where residents can no longer possess, sell or distribute shark fins, which is considered a delicacy in some East Asian cuisine.

Oregon: Family leave in Oregon has been expanded to allow eligible employees two  weeks of pai d leave to handle the death of a family member.

Sources:

Cnn.com

Greg Toppo, USATODAY

Charlotte Observer

the Senate considers S.1569 ~~ Congress 10/14 ~~ the House considers


WethePeople

SCHEDULE FOR MONDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2013

The Senate stands adjourned until 2:00pm on Monday, October 14.

When the Senate convenes, Senator Reid intends to renew the motion to proceed to S.1569, a bill to ensure the complete and timely payment of the obligations of the United States Government until December 31, 2014.

At 5:00pm, the Senate will proceed to Executive Session to consider Executive Calendar #206, the nomination of Andrea Wood, of Illinois, to be a United States District Judge for the Northern District of Illinois; and Executive Calendar #207, the nomination of Madeline Haikala, of Alabama, to be United States District Judge for the Northern District of Alabama. There will be 30 minutes for debate equally divided prior to a series of up 2 roll call votes on confirmation of the nominations

At approximately 5:30pm, the Senate will vote on confirmation of the following nominations:

–          Executive Calendar #206, the nomination of Andrea Wood, of Illinois, to be a United States District Judge for the Northern District of Illinois; and

–          Executive Calendar #207, the nomination of Madeline Haikala, of Alabama, to be United States District Judge for the Northern District of Alabama.

The Wood nomination is expected to be confirmed by voice vote and the Haikala nomination is expected to be confirmed by roll call vote.

Executive Calendar #206, the nomination of Andrea Wood, of Illinois, to be a United States District Judge for the Northern District of Illinois, was confirmed by voice vote.

5:31pm The Senate began a 15 minute roll call vote on confirmation of Executive Calendar #207, the nomination of Madeline Haikala, of Alabama, to be United States District Judge for the Northern District of Alabama.

Confirmed: 90-0

There will be no further roll call votes today.

WRAP UP

ROLL CALL VOTE

1)      Confirmation of Executive Calendar #207, the nomination of Madeline Haikala, of Alabama, to be United States District Judge for the Northern District of Alabama; Confirmed: 90-0

No LEGISLATIVE ITEMS

EXECUTIVE ITEMS

Confirmed Executive Calendar #206, the nomination of Andrea Wood, of Illinois, to be a United States District Judge for the Northern District of Illinois by voice vote.

********************************************************************

Last Floor Action:
12:37:54 P.M. – The House adjourned. 10/12

The next meeting is scheduled for 12:00 p.m. on October 14, 2013.

—————————————————————————-

the Senate ~~ CONGRESS 10/7 ~~ the House


matthew 25

The Senate stands adjourned until 2:00pm on Monday, October 7, 2013.

Following any Leader remarks, the Senate will be in a period of morning business for debate only until 5:00pm with Senators permitted to speak therein for up to 10 minutes each.

At 5:00pm, the Senate will proceed to Executive Session to consider the following:

–          Executive Calendar #204, the nomination of Colin Stirling Bruce, of Illinois, to be United States District Judge for the Central District of Illinois and

–          Executive Calendar #205, the nomination of Sara Lee Ellis, of Illinois, to be United States District Judge for the Northern District of Illinois.

There will be up to 30 minutes of debate equally divided and controlled in the usual form.  Upon the use or yielding back of time, the Senate will vote on confirmation of the nominations.

One roll call vote is expected and one voice vote is expected

If all time is used at approximately 5:30pm, the Senate will proceed to a roll call vote on confirmation of Executive Calendar #204, the nomination of Colin Stirling Bruce, of Illinois, to be United States District Judge for the Central District of Illinois. We expect to confirm Calendar #205, the nomination of Sara Lee Ellis, of Illinois, to be United States District Judge for the Northern District of Illinois, by a voice vote.

5:30pm the Senate began a 15 minute roll call vote on confirmation of Executive Calendar #204, the nomination of Colin Stirling Bruce, of Illinois, to be United States District Judge for the Central District of Illinois;

Confirmed: 96-0

Calendar #205, the nomination of Sara Lee Ellis, of Illinois, to be United States District Judge for the Northern District of Illinois was Confirmed by voice vote

The Senate is in a period of morning business for debate only until 7:30pm.

There will be no further roll call votes tonight.

WRAP UP

ROLL CALL VOTE

1)      Confirmation of Executive Calendar #204, the nomination of Colin Stirling Bruce, of Illinois, to be United States District Judge for the Central District of Illinois; Confirmed: 96-0

LEGISLATIVE ITEMS

Completed the Rule 14 process of:

–          H.J.Res.75, making continuing appropriations for the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children for fiscal year 2014, and for other purposes;

–          H.J.Res.85, making continuing appropriations for the Federal Emergency Management Agency for fiscal year 2014, and for other purposes; and

–          H.R.3223, to provide for the compensation of furloughed Federal employees.

EXECUTIVE ITEMS

Confirmed Executive Calendar #205, the nomination of Sara Lee Ellis, of Illinois, to be United States District Judge for the Northern District of Illinois by voice vote.

By unanimous consent, the nomination of Arun Madhavan Kumar, of California, to be Assistant Secretary of Commerce and Director General of the United States and Foreign Commercial Service, received in the Senate on October 7, 2013, will be jointly referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs and Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.

*********************************************************************************************

Last Floor Action: 10/5
1:53:38 P.M. – The House adjourned.

The next meeting is scheduled for 12:00 p.m. on October 7, 2013.

——————————————————————————

A Better Bargain …


The White House, Washington

Hello everybody —

The basic bargain of this country says that if you work hard, you can get ahead — you can build a secure life for your family, and know that your kids will do even better someday.

But for more than a decade, that bargain has frayed, and a devastating recession made it worse.

Over the past four and a half years, America has fought its way back, laying a new foundation for more durable economic growth.  But many of the challenges that faced the middle class before the recession remain.  And Washington has taken its eye off the ball.

Too many people in this town are focused on scoring political points or fanning phony scandals instead of finding ways to help grow our economy, create jobs, or roll back a 30-year trend of rising inequality.

It’s time for that to stop.  It’s time for all of us to focus on our top priority as a country, and that’s reigniting the engine of our prosperity: a rising, thriving middle class.

That’s what I just said while speaking at Knox College, back home in Illinois, where I kicked off a series of speeches on what truly matters to the middle class.

If building America from the middle out is an idea you share, I need you to stand with me. Add your voice to mine.

This has been my North Star for as long as I’ve been in office, and it’s what will shape the time that I have left in the White House.

In the weeks ahead, in towns across the country, I’ll be talking about my ideas for building on the cornerstones of middle-class security: Good jobs with good wages. An education that prepares our children and our workers for a new economy. A home to call  your own. Affordable health care when you get sick. A secure retirement even if you’re not rich. A better bargain for the middle class,  and for all who are striving to join it.

This is the debate we need to have.  And you can join me right now.

Let the country know that you believe that America works best not when it grows from the top down, but when it grows from the middle out:

http://www.whitehouse.gov/a-better-bargain/speak-out

Thank you,

President Barack Obama

My 4yo daughter shakes when she sees police


 

Change.org
My 4-year-old daughter was traumatized when police simulated a hostage crisis in our housing complex without warning residents. Tell HUD to stop allowing military-style trainings in public housing.
Sign My Petition

On March 21, my four year old daughter and her babysitter were trapped in our apartment in Albany, New York in the middle of a police drill to simulate a hostage situation. She woke up to flash grenades, assault rifles and real tear gas being used in our home. The police threatened my neighbors with arrest if they tried to leave.

I don’t disagree with the police providing training to their officers, but nobody in the complex, not even the tenants’ association, was warned about this drill. People thought it was real.

Last week, the Albany police department apologized for holding the training so close to occupied residences. But my daughter still shakes with fear when she sees the police and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), which actually allowed the police to conduct the training in our community, hasn’t said anything.

I started a petition calling on HUD to pass a national policy to prevent public housing communities from being used as military-style training grounds. Click here to sign my petition now.

The Albany police department says that they chose our neighborhood, which is lower-income and mostly African American, for their training because they wanted it to be “more realistic.” I don’t think this ever would have happened in one of Albany’s wealthier neighborhoods.

This isn’t the first time this has happened, either. Similar exercises have happened in public housing in Illinois, Connecticut, Kentucky and Pennsylvania in the past two years and have even included fake bombs and helicopters.

Public housing is meant to help hardworking people like me build better lives for ourselves and our families through safe and stable communities. Allowing our homes to be used for war games is completely counter to HUD’s mission. That’s why I’m confident that HUD will tell local housing authorities not to allow trainings like these on HUD property — if the department hears from you and many others.

Click here to sign my petition now, calling on HUD to prevent public housing from being used for police or military trainings ever again.

Thank you.

Lauren Manning