1867 – Blacks voted in the municipal election in Tuscumbia, AL.


The Alabama 1867 voter registration records were created as a direct result of a Reconstruction Act passed by the United States Congress on March 23, 1867. The act required the commanding officer in each military district to hold, before September 1, 1867, a registration of all male citizens, 21 years and older, in each county who were also qualified to vote and who had taken the loyalty oath.

Alabama 1867 Voter Registration Records Database alabama.gov
Several Alabama counties were not yet established at the time of the 1867 voter registration: Chilton, Cullman, Escambia, Geneva, and Houston. There is no voter registration book available for Clarke County.

The books for the following counties were severely damaged from mold: Dallas; Franklin; Lauderdale; Limestone; Lowndes; Monroe; Randolph; and Washington. Some information may be missing due to the extent of the mold damage.

.About the Database | History | Corrections to the Database | Search

About the Database
This database was created by staff and volunteers from the entries in the 131 volumes of the 1867 Voter Registration Records maintained by the Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH). The volumes are significant genealogical records as this is one of the first statewide government documents that record African-American males living in Alabama. Because no index existed for individual volumes or for the records as a whole, and because of the deteriorating condition of the records, in 2004 ADAH staff began scanning the documents and keying the data from each entry into a computer database. When a successful search retrieves a name from the database, an image of the page where the entry resides will also be available for your use.

In creating the database, staff and volunteers were instructed to copy the entries exactly as they are written in each volume, to the best of their ability in interpreting the handwriting. If a staff member was unable to determine the spelling of an entry, s/he placed a question mark within brackets to indicate that the name/spelling is uncertain.

There are several points that users should understand about the 1867 Voter Registration Records before using the database. 1) Because the local military authorities responsible for registering individuals in 1867 may have interpreted the Act (see History) regarding the creation of the records differently, a number of otherwise eligible citizens living in the county may not be reflected in the volumes. 2) Each volume has columns for the following information: Name, Race, County of residence, Precinct, Length of residence (in state, in county, in precinct), Book and page where the individual’s Loyalty Oath” (Loyalty Oath series closed due to condition. Appointment required for viewing.) is recorded, Native country or state, and other remarks. However, not every entry includes each piece of information. 3) Many entries have the first names abbreviated. The common abbreviations used are:

Chas = Charles
Geo = George
Danl = Daniel
Jas = James
Jno = John
Jos = Joseph
Robt = Robert
Thos = Thomas
Wash = Washington
Wm = William

History
The Alabama 1867 voter registration records were created as a direct result of a Reconstruction Act passed by the United States Congress on March 23, 1867. The act required the commanding officer in each military district to hold, before September 1, 1867, a registration of all male citizens, 21 years and older, in each county who were also qualified to vote and who had taken the loyalty oath. (See http://www.legislature.state.al.us/misc/history/constitutions/1868/1868enablinginst.html for full text of the act.) Each registrant visited the local registration office, took the oath, and was listed in the Voter Registration record.

Corrections to the Database:
Staff members will do their best to make any corrections to obvious misspellings or errors in data entry.

Alabama 1867 Voter Registration Records Database
Several Alabama counties were not yet established at the time of the 1867 voter registration: Chilton, Cullman, Escambia, Geneva, and Houston. There is no voter registration book available for Clarke County.

The books for the following counties were severely damaged from mold: Dallas; Franklin; Lauderdale; Limestone; Lowndes; Monroe; Randolph; and Washington. Some information may be missing due to the extent of the mold damage.

About the Database
This database was created by staff and volunteers from the entries in the 131 volumes of the 1867 Voter Registration Records maintained by the Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH). The volumes are significant genealogical records as this is one of the first statewide government documents that record African-American males living in Alabama. Because no index existed for individual volumes or for the records as a whole, and because of the deteriorating condition of the records, in 2004 ADAH staff began scanning the documents and keying the data from each entry into a computer database. When a successful search retrieves a name from the database, an image of the page where the entry resides will also be available for your use.

In creating the database, staff and volunteers were instructed to copy the entries exactly as they are written in each volume, to the best of their ability in interpreting the handwriting. If a staff member was unable to determine the spelling of an entry, s/he placed a question mark within brackets to indicate that the name/spelling is uncertain.

There are several points that users should understand about the 1867 Voter Registration Records before using the database. 1) Because the local military authorities responsible for registering individuals in 1867 may have interpreted the Act (see History) regarding the creation of the records differently, a number of otherwise eligible citizens living in the county may not be reflected in the volumes. 2) Each volume has columns for the following information: Name, Race, County of residence, Precinct, Length of residence (in state, in county, in precinct), Book and page where the individual’s Loyalty Oath” (Loyalty Oath series closed due to condition. Appointment required for viewing.) is recorded, Native country or state, and other remarks. However, not every entry includes each piece of information. 3) Many entries have the first names abbreviated. The common abbreviations used are:

Chas = Charles
Geo = George
Danl = Daniel
Jas = James
Jno = John
Jos = Joseph
Robt = Robert
Thos = Thomas
Wash = Washington
Wm = William

History
The Alabama 1867 voter registration records were created as a direct result of a Reconstruction Act passed by the United States Congress on March 23, 1867. The act required the commanding officer in each military district to hold, before September 1, 1867, a registration of all male citizens, 21 years and older, in each county who were also qualified to vote and who had taken the loyalty oath. (See http://www.legislature.state.al.us/misc/history/constitutions/1868/1868enablinginst.html for full text of the act.) Each registrant visited the local registration office, took the oath, and was listed in the Voter Registration record.

Corrections to the Database:
Staff members will do their best to make any corrections to obvious misspellings or errors in data entry.

ancestry.com

alabama.gov

The History of April Fools


by history.com
   Photo by Jeff Peterson, Deseret NewsJeff Peterson shares some historical April Fools Day pranks. (Deseret Photo)

On this day in 1700, English pranksters began popularizing the annual tradition of April Fools’ Day by playing practical jokes on each other.

Although the day, also called All Fools’ Day, has been celebrated for several centuries by different cultures, its exact origins remain a mystery. Some historians speculate that April Fools’ Day dates back to 1582, when France switched from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar, as called for by the Council of Trent in 1563. People who were slow to get the news or failed to recognize that the start of the new year had moved to January 1 and continued to celebrate it during the last week of March through April 1 became the butt of jokes and hoaxes. These included having paper fish placed on their backs and being referred to as “poisson d’avril” (April fish), said to symbolize a young, easily caught fish and a gullible person.Historians have also linked April Fools’ Day to ancient festivals such as Hilaria, which was celebrated in Rome at the end of March and involved people dressing up in disguises. There’s also speculation that April Fools’ Day was tied to the vernal equinox, or first day of spring in the Northern Hemisphere, when Mother Nature fooled people with changing, unpredictable weather.April Fools’ Day spread throughout Britain during the 18th century. In Scotland, the tradition became a two-day event, starting with “hunting the gowk,” in which people were sent on phony errands (gowk is a word for cuckoo bird, a symbol for fool) and followed by Tailie Day, which involved pranks played on people’s derrieres, such as pinning fake tails or “kick me” signs on them.In modern times, people have gone to great lengths to create elaborate April Fools’ Day hoaxes. Newspapers, radio and TV stations and Web sites have participated in the April 1 tradition of reporting outrageous fictional claims that have fooled their audiences. In 1957, the BBC reported that Swiss farmers were experiencing a record spaghetti crop and showed footage of people harvesting noodles from trees; numerous viewers were fooled. In 1985, Sports Illustrated tricked many of its readers when it ran a made-up article about a rookie pitcher named Sidd Finch who could throw a fastball over 168 miles per hour. In 1996, Taco Bell, the fast-food restaurant chain, duped people when it announced it had agreed to purchase Philadelphia’s Liberty Bell and intended to rename it the Taco Liberty Bell. In 1998, after Burger King advertised a “Left-Handed Whopper,” scores of clueless customers requested the fake sandwich.

1621 – The Plymouth, MA, colonists created the first treaty with Native Americans.


peace-treaty

On April 1, 1621, the first peace treaty between the American colonists and the Native Americans was made in Plymouth, Massachusetts. The process began when Samoset, Squanto, and three companions paid a visit to the colonists’ tiny colony. They informed the newcomers that the great Sachem Massasoit, his brother Quadequina and about 60 men were in the area.
The Pilgrims would not send their governor, John Carver, to meet with them, and the Native Americans were likewise unwilling to yield to the colonists. After mutual assurances, gift-giving and finally hostage-taking, Captain Standish, William Brewster and six musketeers met Massasoit at a brook where they faced each other and saluted.
With Standish and Brewster flanking each side of the Native American king, they led him into a house with several cushions on the floor. Governor Carver immediately entered the house followed by drum and trumpet and several more musketeers. The Governor kissed Massasoit’s hand and Massasoit returned the gesture, then both men sat down.

Governor Carver ordered that some “strong water,” be served so he could toast the great Sachem Massasoit, who broke out in a sweat when he sampled the liquor. Massasoit was much more impressed by the Governor’s trumpets, and some of his men sounded them as best they could.

Soon enough they got down to business and negotiated a peace treaty. Partial, but crucial, terms included:

  • That neither he [Governor Carver] nor any of his should do hurt to any of their people.
  • That if any of his did hurt any of theirs, he should send the offender, that they might punish him.
  • That if anything were taken away from any of theirs, he should cause it to be restored; and they should do the like to his.
  • If any did unjustly war against him, they would aid him; if any did war against them, he should aid them.
  • He should send to his neighbors confederates to certify them of this, that they might not wrong them, but might be likewise compromised in the conditions of peace.
  • That when their men came to them, they should leave their bows and arrows behind them.
  • That King James would esteem Massasoit as his friend and ally.

Years later, it came to light that the Wampanoag wasn’t the only tribe responsible for this peace treaty, but instead there were ten other Native American tribes in the area lending their support to the alliance.

On November 13, 1997, which Massachusetts Governor Paul Cellucci officially announced as Massasoit Compact Day, an official proclamation was released, which stated:

The Old Plimoth Indians gave their lives to protect Pilgrims and the development of democracy under the Grand Sachem Massasoit, ten tribes, including Blacke Tisquantum of the Assowomsett, Cawnacome of the Manmomett, Squanto of the Patuxet, Ohquamehud of the Nausets, Obbitima and Chicataubut of the Massachusett, Nattawahunt of the Connecticut, Caunbitant of the Pocasset, Huttamoiden of the Socasset, Appanow of the Capwack, which made up the Indian Nation of the Totem of the Wolf.”
The peace treaty was a great success, lasting more than five decades.