1964 – Ratification of the 24th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was completed. This amendment eliminated the poll tax in federal elections.


What is the 24th Amendment?

“Section 1. The right of citizens of the United States to vote in any primary or other election for President or Vice President, for electors for President or Vice President, or for Senator or Representative in Congress, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State by reason of failure to pay any poll tax or other tax.

Section 2. The Congress shall have the power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.”

The 24th Amendment Defined

Date Proposed

The 24th Amendment was proposed on August 27th, 1962

Date Passed

The 24th Amendment was passed on January 23rd, 1964

for the complete article… constitution.laws.com

On This day … January 23


HISTORY …

2001 – A van used by the remaining two fugitives of the “Texas 7” was recovered in Colorado Springs, CO. A few hours later police surrounded a hotel where the convicts were hiding. Patrick Murphy Jr. and Donald Newbury were taken into custody the next morning without incident.

2002 – John Walker Lindh returned to the U.S. under FBI custody. Lindh was charge with conspiring to kill U.S. citizens, providing support to terrorists and engaging in prohibited transactions with the Taliban while a member of the al-Quaida terrorist organization in Afghanistan

1907 – Charles Curtis, of Kansas, began serving in the United States Senate. He was the first American Indian to become a U.S. Senator. He resigned in March of 1929 to become U.S. President Herbert Hoover’s Vice President.


Charles Curtis

In the spring of 1932, George and Ira Gershwin’s Broadway musical, “Of Thee I Sing,” spoofed Washington politics, including a vice president named Alexander Throttlebottom, who could get inside the White House only on public tours. The tour guide, who failed to recognize Throttlebottom, at one point engaged him in a discussion of the vice-presidency:

Guide: Well, how did he come to be Vice President?

Throttlebottom: Well, they put a lot of names in a hat, and he lost.

Guide:  What does he do all the time?

Throttlebottom:  Well, he sits in the park and feeds the peanuts to the pigeons and the squirrels, and then he takes walks, and goes to the movies. Last week, he tried to join the library, but he needed two references, so he couldn’t get in.(1)

Audiences laughed heartily at these lines, in part because they could easily identify the hapless Throttlebottom with the incumbent vice president, Charles Curtis. Curtis was never close to President Herbert Hoover and played no significant role in his administration. Despite Curtis’ many years of experience as a member of the House and Senate and as Senate majority leader, his counsel was rarely sought on legislative matters. His chief notoriety as vice president came as a result of a messy social squabble over protocol, which only made him appear ridiculous.  Many Republicans hoped to dump Curtis from the ticket when Hoover ran for reelection. Given Curtis’ Horatio Alger-style rise in life, and his long and successful career in Congress, how did he become such a Throttlebottom as vice president?  

Formative Years on the Reservation

Although colorful in itself, Charles Curtis’ actual life story often became obscured by its political mythology.(2) He began life in 1860 in North Topeka, Kansas, where he spent his earliest years partly in the white and partly in the Native American community. The son of Orren Curtis, a white man, and Ellen Pappan, who was one-quarter Kaw Indian, Charles Curtis on his mother’s side was the great-great grandson of White Plume, a Kansa-Kaw chief who had offered assistance to the Lewis and Clark expedition in 1804. White Plume’s daughter married Louis Gonville, a French-Canadian fur trader, and their daughter, Julie Gonville, married Louis Pappan. As a result of the Kansa-Kaw treaty of 1825, the tribe relinquished its claims to its traditional lands in Missouri and Kansas. A two-million-acre reservation was established west of Topeka for full-blooded Indians, while a series of fee-simple land grants along the Kansas river were set aside for “half-breeds”—those who had intermarried with whites. Curtis’ grandmother Julie Gonville Pappan received “Half-Breed Reservation No. Four,” directly across the river from the Kansas capital, where she and her husband ran a profitable ferry business.

cop.senate.gov

history… January 23


1556 – An earthquake in Shanxi Province, China, was thought to have killed about 830,000 people.

1571 – The Royal Exchange in London, founded by financier Thomas Gresham, was opened by Queen Elizabeth I.

1789 – Georgetown College was established as the first Catholic college in the U.S. The school is in Washington, DC.

1845 – The U.S. Congress decided all national elections would be held on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November.

1849 – English-born Elizabeth Blackwell became the first woman in America to receive medical degree. It was from the Medical Institution of Geneva, NY.

1907 – Charles Curtis, of Kansas, began serving in the United States Senate. He was the first American Indian to become a U.S. Senator. He resigned in March of 1929 to become U.S. President Herbert Hoover’s Vice President.

1920 – The Dutch government refused the demands from the Allies to hand over the ex-kaiser of Germany.

1924 – The first Labour government was formed, under Ramsay MacDonald.

1937 – In Moscow, seventeen people went on trial during Josef Stalin’s “Great Purge.”

1941 – The play, “Lady in the Dark” premiered.

1943 – Duke Ellington and the band played for a black-tie crowd at Carnegie Hall in New York City for the first time.

1943 – The British captured Tripoli from the Germans.

1950 – The Israeli Knesset approved a resolution proclaiming Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

1960 – The U.S. Navy bathyscaphe Trieste descended to a record depth of 35,820 feet (10,750 meters) in the Pacific Ocean.

1964 – Ratification of the 24th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was completed. This amendment eliminated the poll tax in federal elections.

1968 – North Korea seized the U.S. Navy ship Pueblo, charging it had intruded into the nation’s territorial waters on a spying mission. The crew was released 11 months later.

1971 – In Prospect Creek Camp, AK, the lowest temperature ever recorded in the U.S. was reported as minus 80 degrees.

1973 – U.S. President Nixon announced that an accord had been reached to end the Vietnam War.

1974 – Mike Oldfield’s “Tubular Bells” opened the credits of the movie, “The Exorcist”.

1975 – “Barney Miller” made his debut on ABC-TV.

1977 – The TV mini-series “Roots,” began airing on ABC. The show was based on the Alex Haley novel.

1978 – Sweden banned aerosol sprays because of damage to environment. They were the first country to do so.

1983 – “The A-Team” debuted on TV.

1985 – O.J. Simpson became the first Heisman Trophy winner to be elected to pro football’s Hall of Fame in Canton, OH.

1985 – The proceedings of the House of Lords were televised for the first time.

1989 – Surrealist artist Salvador Dali died in Spain at age 84.

1997 – A judge in Fairfax, VA, sentenced Mir Aimal Kasi to death for an assault rifle attack outside the CIA headquarters in 1993 that killed two men and wounded three other people.

1997 – A British woman received a record £186,000 damages for Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI).

2001 – A van used by the remaining two fugitives of the “Texas 7” was recovered in Colorado Springs, CO. A few hours later police surrounded a hotel where the convicts were hiding. Patrick Murphy Jr. and Donald Newbury were taken into custody the next morning without incident.

2002 – John Walker Lindh returned to the U.S. under FBI custody. Lindh was charge with conspiring to kill U.S. citizens, providing support to terrorists and engaging in prohibited transactions with the Taliban while a member of the al-Quaida terrorist organization in Afghanistan.

2003 – North Korea announced that it would consider sanctions an act of war for North Korea’s reinstatement of its nuclear program.

2017 – In Bel air, Los Angeles, the most expensive house, known as the “Billionaire,” in the United States went on the market at $250 million. It eventually sold for $94 million.

on-this-day.com