Tag Archives: Equal Pay Day

Demand a Vote on the Paycheck fairness Act


National Women's Law Center - Stop Discounting Women
Write Your Representative Today
                It’s time for the House to hold an up or down vote on the Paycheck Fairness Act.
Take Action

Dear Carmen,
Late last week, the House of Representatives blocked a vote on the Paycheck Fairness Act. This was a blow to all of us who have worked so hard on policies to help close the wage gap.
But it’s not over yet! That’s right — there is a way to FORCE a vote on the Paycheck Fairness Act. Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro put forward what’s called a “discharge petition” and all we need to do is get 218 Representatives to sign it in order to release the bill for a vote.
That’s where you come in. We need you to urge your Representative to stand up for fair pay by signing the “discharge petition” on the Paycheck Fairness Act. The more noise we make, the more likely we’ll reach our goal.
A vote on the Paycheck Fairness Act is long overdue. For the last decade, the typical woman who works full time, year round has made 77 cents for every dollar earned by her male counterparts. That 23-cent wage gap translates into more than $400,000 in lost wages over a woman’s lifetime.
Here’s why we need the Paycheck Fairness Act. It would:

  • Make it harder for employers to pay women less for doing the same work.
  • Prohibit unfair retaliation against employees who discuss their wages with their co-workers.
  • Guarantee that employers who break the law compensate women for the pay they are owed.

It’s time to move the Paycheck Fairness Act forward. Urge your Representative to sign the discharge petition.
Thank you for all you do.
Sincerely,

Fatima Goss Graves Fatima Goss Graves Vice President for Education and Employment National Women’s Law Center    

Working Hard for Less Money


ThinkProgress War Room

What the Pay Gap Means for Women & Their Families

Today is Equal Pay Day, which marks the additional days into 2013 that a woman needs to work just to equal what a man made in 2012. The pay gap is real — and really persistent.

The amount that women lose as a result of the pay gap doesn’t just hurt them. Their families also pay the price for this lost income. Here’s what the median pay gap means over the course of just one year: $10,784. The total cost to a woman and her family over the course of her entire working life is staggering: $431,360.

Click through to check out an interactive version of this graphic showing how the pay gap affects women’s lives:

You can find all of our resources on equal pay HERE.

BOTTOM LINE: It’s 2013 and Congress needs to pass meaningful equal pay legislation like the Paycheck Fairness Act. Republicans have blocked this vital bill during the last three Congresses and it’s well past time for them to stop standing in the way of equal pay.

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Today is the Day


National Women's Law Center - Stop Discounting Women
Today is the day!
                Thank the President for his leadership on fair pay today and ask him to sign a fair pay executive order.
Take Action

Today is the day!
Equal Pay Day represents the day that the average woman’s wages finally catch up to the average man’s earnings from the year before. You read that right: we had to get more than 3 months into 2013 before women’s wages caught up with men’s from the prior year.
We need to channel our shock and anger into action or it’s not going to get any better.
That’s why we need your help RIGHT NOW! Thank the President for his leadership on fair pay today and ask him to take the next step by signing an executive order on equal pay.
The executive order would ensure that contractors who do business with the federal government cannot retaliate against workers who discuss their own pay. The order would affect over 20 percent of America‘s civilian workforce.
The bottom line is that you can’t learn if you’re being paid less if your employer can penalize you for talking about your salary. That’s the rule that applied to Lilly Ledbetter when she worked for Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., which was, you guessed it, a federal contractor. It took her nearly 20 years to find out that she was being paid as much as 40 percent less than her male co-workers. Had there been a ban on these sorts of punishing pay practices, Lilly might have learned much earlier about her lower pay.
President Obama can take steps to end retaliatory pay secrecy policies among federal contractors. Please join us by taking action today!
This is why we need your help: After a decade in which the 23-cent wage gap has not budged one penny, we must fight this issue on all fronts. That’s why we’re asking President Obama to sign the executive order. And that’s why we’re also working with our champions in Congress to pass key equal pay legislation like the Paycheck Fairness Act and the Fair Pay Act.
Thanks for your support and continued work on this important issue.
Sincerely,

Fatima Goss Graves Fatima Goss Graves Vice President for Education and Employment National Women’s Law Center    

P.S. NWLC has released new resources for Equal Pay Day. Check out our interactive wage gap map and new fact sheets on how the wage gap hurts women and families, wage gap and women of color, and explaining the wage gap.
P.P.S. Want to take action on Facebook? Share our new graphic that explains why punitive pay secrecy policies punish employees and help hide discrimination.

Forty-Nine Years and 77 Cents … Fatima Goss Graves, National Women’s Law Center


Here’s a “fun” fact for you: 49 years after President Kennedy signed the Equal Pay Act, women working full-time are paid just 77 cents on the dollar compared to their male counterparts. And the wage gap is far worse for women of color.

Earlier this week, we asked you to urge President Obama to ban federal contractors from retaliating against employees who talk about their wages. But that’s only one front in women’s struggle to achieve equal pay for equal work. Will you help?

Please donate $10 today to support the Center’s work on Paycheck Fairness and other issues important to women and their families.

With millions of Americans still unemployed or underemployed, the wage gap isn’t a question of equity alone: closing it is an economic necessity. The Center is pushing hard to revive the Paycheck Fairness Act, a bill stalled by a determined minority of opponents in the last Congress. Among many other economic issues, we’re also fighting for increases in the minimum wage and for funding for the child care support so vital for women with children who work outside the home.

Please donate $10 today to support the Center’s work to eliminate the wage gap and push for other policies critical to women and their families.

Without you and the other members of our activist community, we wouldn’t be able to advocate as effectively as we do. Can you take an extra step today? Please donate $10 to support the Center’s work. Thank you for all the help you give.

Sincerely

Fatima Goss Graves Vice President for Education and Employment National Women’s Law Center

P.S. Please donate today — Your support will make a difference.

Shh! Never Discuss Your Salary … Fatima Goss Graves, National Women’s Law Center


Never discuss your salary with anyone.

That’s what they told Lilly Ledbetter on her first day on the job in 1979. It wasn’t until she found an anonymous note in her locker that Lilly realized that she was being paid as much as 40% less than her male colleagues in the same position.

This sort of pay secrecy policy that punishes employees helps to hide discriminatory pay practices. And here’s the kicker: Lilly worked all those years for Goodyear Tire & Rubber, which had the privilege of being a federal contractor.

Today is Equal Pay Day — the day that a typical woman’s wages finally catch up to a typical man’s in 2011. Ask President Obama to ban federal contractors from retaliating against employees who talk about wages.

It took Lilly 20 years to find out that she was being paid less than her male co-workers. But we know that Lilly is not alone: nearly fifty years after President Kennedy signed the Equal Pay Act, women working full time are paid just 77 cents on the dollar compared to their male counterparts. And the wage gap is far worse for women of color.

It’s time to end punishing pay secrecy policies among federal contractors.

The President has the executive power to protect employees who work in companies that have federal contracts. Presidents have used executive orders to address other workplace rights, including requiring that contractors protect their employees from discrimination on the job.

In recognition of Equal Pay Day, join us in calling on President Obama to end retaliatory pay secrecy policies in federal contracting.

Thanks for your support!

Sincerely,

Fatima Goss Graves
Vice President for Education and Employment
National Women’s Law Center
P.S. NWLC has some brand new resources released for Equal Pay Day. Check out our interactive wage gap map and new fact sheets on the wage gap and women of color, minimum wage and combating punitive pay secrecy policies.