Voter Registration Deadline


vote.org

AlabamaIn-Person: 15 days before Election Day. You can also conditionally register to vote up to and including on Election Day in person at your County Elections Office, or, in some counties, at a County Elections satellite office or vote center.By Mail: 15 days before Election Day.Online: 15 days before Election Day.N/A
AlaskaIn-Person: 30 days before Election Day.By Mail: Postmarked 30 days before Election Day. If this falls on a Sunday, your voter registration form must be postmarked 31 days before Election Day.Online: 30 days before Election Day.N/A
ArizonaIn-Person: 29 days before Election Day.By Mail: Received 29 days before Election Day.Online: 29 days before Election Day.N/A
ArkansasIn-Person: 30 days before Election Day.By Mail: Postmarked 30 days before Election Day.Online: N/AN/A
CaliforniaIn-Person: 15 days before Election Day. You can also conditionally register to vote up to and including on Election Day in person at your County Elections Office, or, in some counties, at a County Elections satellite office or vote center.By Mail: 15 days before Election Day.Online: 15 days before Election Day.If the voter registration deadline has passed, you can still conditionally register to vote and cast a provisional ballot in person at your County Elections Office at any time up to and including Election Day. Your provisional ballot will be counted when your County Elections Official verifies your voter registration.Conditional registration may also be available in County Elections satellite offices and vote centers.
ColoradoIn-Person: Election Day.By Mail: Received 8 days before Election Day.Online: 8 days before Election Day.You can register and cast a ballot up through Election Day by appearing in-person at a Voter Service and Polling Center during the Early Voting period or on Election Day. Contact your Local Election Office if you have any questions.
ConnecticutIn-Person: 7 days before Election Day.By Mail: Postmarked 7 days before Election Day.Online: 7 days before Election Day.If the voter registration deadline has passed, you can still register to vote in person at the office of your Local Election Office on Election Day. Contact your Local Election Office if you have any questions.
DelawareIn-Person: The fourth Saturday before a primary or general election. 10 days before a special election.By Mail: The fourth Saturday before a primary or general election. 10 days before a special election.Online: The fourth Saturday before a primary or general election. 10 days before a special election.N/A
District of ColumbiaIn-Person: Election Day, with proof of residency.By Mail: Received by 4:45 p.m. on the 21st day before Election Day.Online: Received by 4:45 p.m. on the 21st day before Election Day.If you have missed the voter registration deadline, you can still register to vote and a cast a ballot at the same time during early voting or on Election Day. Simply go to your regular polling place or early voting site to register and vote. Contact your Local Election Office if you have any questions. You will need to bring proof of residency, such as a government photo ID, or a copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, or pay check that shows your current name and address.
FloridaIn-Person: 29 days before Election Day. But if you or a family member has been discharged from the military or returned from a deployment outside the US after the deadline, you can register until 5 p.m. the Friday before Election Day.By Mail: 29 days before Election Day. But if you or a family member has been discharged from the military or returned from a deployment outside the US after the deadline, you can register until 5 p.m. the Friday before Election Day.Online:N/A
GeorgiaIn-Person: The fifth Monday before Election Day.By Mail: Postmarked the fifth Monday before Election Day.Online: The fifth Monday before Election Day.N/A
HawaiiIn-Person: 29 days before Election Day.By Mail: 29 days before Election Day.Online: 29 days before Election Day.If you have missed the voter registration deadline, you can still register to vote and a cast a ballot at the same time during early voting at early walk-in locations and on Election Day at your polling place. Contact your Local Election Office if you have any questions.
IdahoIn-Person: Election Day. (You must show proof of residence to register at the polls on Election Day.)By Mail: 25 days before Election Day.Online: 25 days before Election Day.If you have missed the voter registration deadline, you can still register to vote and a cast a ballot at the same time during early voting or on Election Day. Simply go to your regular polling place or early voting site to register and vote. You will need to show proof of residence and a photo ID. Contact your Local Election Office if you have any questions.
IllinoisIn-Person: Election DayBy Mail: Postmarked 28 days before Election Day.Online: 28 days before Election Day.You can also register in person (and vote) at your local elections office during the “grace period.” The grace period starts 27 days before Election Day and ends on Election Day. Grace Period Voting does NOT take place at your regular polling place. Grace Period Voting almost always happens at your Local Election Office. Contact your Local Election Office for more information.
IndianaIn-Person: 29 days before Election Day.By Mail: 29 days before Election Day.Online: 29 days before Election Day.N/A
IowaIn-Person: 10 days before general elections. 11 days before all other elections. If you miss these deadlines, you can also register to vote on Election Day.By Mail: Postmarked 15 days before Election Day or received 10 days before Election Day.Online: 10 days before Election Day.If you have missed the voter registration deadline, you can still register to vote and a cast a ballot at the same time during early voting or on Election Day. Simply go to your regular polling place or early voting site to register and vote. Contact your Local Election Office if you have any questions.
KansasIn-Person: 21 days before Election Day.By Mail: 21 days before Election Day.Online: 21 days before Election Day.N/A
KentuckyIn-Person: 29 days before Election Day.By Mail: 29 days before Election Day.Online: 29 days before Election Day.N/A
LouisianaIn-Person: Received 30 days before Election Day. If that day is a weekend or holiday, then the deadline is the first day after the weekend or holiday.By Mail: Received 30 days before Election Day. If that day is a weekend or holiday, then the deadline is the first day after the weekend or holiday.Online: Received 30 days before Election Day. If that day is a weekend or holiday, then the deadline is the first day after the weekend or holiday.N/A
MaineIn-Person: Election Day.By Mail: Delivered 21 business days before Election Day.Online: N/AIf you have missed the voter registration deadline, you can still register to vote and a cast a ballot at the same time during early voting or on Election Day. To register under these rules, you must visit the office of your Local Election Office before voting. Contact your Local Election Office with any questions.
MarylandIn-Person: 21 days before Election Day or during early voting between 13 and 5 days before Election Day.By Mail: 21 days before Election Day.Online: 21 days before Election Day.You can register to vote in-person during early voting. You will need to bring your MVA-issued license, ID card, or change of address card, or a paycheck, bank statement, utility bill, or other government document that has your name and current address.
MassachusettsIn-Person: 20 days before Election Day.By Mail: 20 days before Election Day.Online: 20 days before Election Day.N/A
MichiganIn-Person: 30 days before Election Day.By Mail: 30 days before Election Day.Online: N/AN/A
MinnesotaIn-Person: Election DayBy Mail: Received 21 days before Election Day.Online: 21 days before Election Day.If you have missed the voter registration deadline, you can still register to vote and a cast a ballot at the same time during the in-person absentee voting period or on Election Day. Simply go to your regular in-person absentee voting site — or to your regular polling place — to register and vote. Contact your Local Election Office if you have any questions.
MississippiIn-Person: 30 days before Election Day.By Mail: 30 days before Election Day.Online: N/AN/A
MissouriIn-Person: The fourth Wednesday before Election Day.By Mail: The fourth Wednesday before Election Day.Online: The fourth Wednesday before Election Day.N/A
MontanaIn-Person: Election Day. (Note that late registration is closed from 12:00 to 5:00 p.m. the day before Election Day.)By Mail: Postmarked 30 days before Election Day and received 27 days before Election Day.Online: N/AIf you have missed the voter registration deadline, you can still register to vote and a cast a ballot at the same time during early voting or on Election Day. You’ll have to register at the office of your Local Election Office — not at a polling place. Contact yourLocal Election Office for questions about the process or identification requirements.
NebraskaIn-Person: 6:00 p.m. the second Friday before Election Day. (This is 11 days before Election Day for Tuesday elections.)By Mail: The third Friday before Election Day. (This is 18 days before Election Day for Tuesday elections.)Online: The third Friday before Election Day. (This is 18 days before Election Day for Tuesday elections.)N/A
NevadaIn-Person: 21 days before Election Day.By Mail: 31 days before Election Day.Online: 21 days before Election Day.N/A
New HampshireIn-Person: Election DayBy Mail: Received 10 days before Election Day.Online: N/AIf you have missed the voter registration deadline, you can still register to vote and a cast a ballot at the same time on Election Day. Simply go to your regular polling place or early voting site to register and vote. Contact your Local Election Office for questions about the process or identification requirements.
New JerseyIn-Person: 21 days before Election Day.By Mail: 21 days before Election Day.Online: N/AN/A
New MexicoIn-Person: 28 days before Election Day. The County Clerk will also accept registration forms received by the Friday after the close of registration, so long as they were signed 28 days before Election Day.By Mail: Postmarked 28 days before Election Day. The County Clerk will also accept registration forms received by the Friday after the close of registration, so long as they were signed 28 days before Election Day.Online: 28 days before Election Day.N/A
New YorkIn-Person: 25 days before Election Day. (10 days before Election Day for special elections.)By Mail: Postmarked 25 days before Election Day and received no later than 20 days before Election Day.Online: 25 days before Election Day.N/A
North CarolinaIn-Person: 25 days before Election Day. If you miss the voter registration deadline, you can still register and vote at the same time at a “one-stop” site during the absentee voting period (early voting). Contact your Local Election Official for more information.By Mail: Postmarked 25 days before Election Day and received 20 days before Election Day.Online: N/AN/A
North DakotaIn-Person: North Dakota does not have voter registration. You simply need to bring valid proof of ID and residency to the polls in order to vote.By Mail: North Dakota does not have voter registration. You simply need to bring valid proof of ID and residency to the polls in order to vote.Online: North Dakota does not have voter registration. You simply need to bring valid proof of ID and residency to the polls in order to vote.North Dakota does not have voter registration. You simply need to bring valid proof of ID and residency to the polls in order to vote.
OhioIn-Person: 30 days before Election Day.By Mail: 30 days before Election Day.Online: 30 days before Election Day.N/A
OklahomaIn-Person: 25 days before Election Day.By Mail: 25 days before Election Day.Online: N/AN/A
OregonIn-Person: 21 days before Election Day.By Mail: Received 21 days before Election Day.Online: 21 days before Election Day.N/A
PennsylvaniaIn-Person: 30 days before Election Day.By Mail: Postmarked 30 days before Election Day.Online: 30 days before Election Day.N/A
Rhode IslandIn-Person: 30 days before most elections. You may also register in person on Election Day but only for Presidential electionsBy Mail: 30 days before Election Day.Online: 30 days before Election Day. (But if the 30th day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday, applications will be accepted until the next business day.)You may register in person on Election Day at your local Board of Canvassers but only for Presidential elections.
South CarolinaIn-Person: 30 days before Election Day.By Mail: 30 days before Election Day.Online: 30 days before Election Day.N/A
South DakotaIn-Person: 15 days before Election Day.By Mail: Received 15 days before Election Day.Online: N/AN/A
TennesseeIn-Person: 30 days before Election Day. (But if the 30th day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday, applications will be accepted until the next business day.)By Mail: 30 days before Election Day. (But if the 30th day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday, applications will be accepted until the next business day.)Online: 30 days before Election Day. (But if the 30th day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday, applications will be accepted until the next business day.)N/A
TexasIn-Person: 30 days before Election Day.By Mail: Postmarked 30 days before Election Day.Online: N/AN/A
UtahIn-Person: 7 days before Election Day.By Mail: 30 days before Election Day.Online: 7 days before Election Day.N/A
VermontIn-Person: Election Day. (Note that late registration is closed from 12:00 to 5:00 p.m. the day before Election Day.)By Mail: Election Day.Online: Election Day. But if you register online the day before the election or on Election Day, your application may not be processed and your name may not appear on the checklist and you may be asked to fill out another application at the polls. To be sure your name appears on the checklist, please register by the Friday before the election.You can register to vote on Election Day at your polling place.
VirginiaIn-Person: 22 days before Election Day.By Mail: Received 22 days before Election Day.Online: 22 days before Election Day.N/A
WashingtonIn-Person: 8 days before Election Day.By Mail: 29 days before Election Day.Online: 29 days before Election Day.N/A
West VirginiaIn-Person: 21 days before Election Day.By Mail: Postmarked 21 days before Election Day.Online: 21 days before Election Day.N/A
WisconsinIn-Person: Election Day.By Mail: Postmarked at least 20 days before Election Day.Online: 20 days before Election Day.If the voter registration deadline has passed, you can still register to vote in person up until Election Day. You can register to vote in person at the Municipal Clerk’s office up until 5:00 p.m. or close of business (whichever is later) the Friday before Election Day. You also can register to vote in person at your polling place on Election Day.
WyomingIn-Person: Election DayBy Mail: Received 14 days before Election Day.Online: N/AIf you have missed the voter registration deadline, you can still register to vote and a cast a ballot at the same time during early voting or on Election Day. Simply go to your regular polling place or early voting site to register and vote. Contact your Local Election Office for questions about the process or identification requirements.

after the Historic win


“We can be the David in the situation where there is a Goliath.” — Andrew Gillum accepting the Democratic nomination for governor of Florida (8/28/2018)

Indivisibles —

It’s been more than 20 years since Florida elected a Democratic governor. And for far too long, Florida voters had to “choose” between Republicans and rich, white moderate Democrats.

But when Floridians head to the polls on November 6, they’ll have the opportunity to elect a new voice, and a true progressive. Last night, Tallahassee mayor Andrew Gillum won the Democratic party’s nomination for Governor of Florida. He’ll face off against Rep. Ron DeSantis (FL-06), a conservative who voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act, has an A rating from the NRA, and sides with Trump’s bigoted anti-immigrant policies (oh, and he’s that guy who made an ad teaching his toddler how to “build the wall”).

Andrew beat a crowded Democratic field of millionaires and billionaires (seriously, billionaires) because progressive values resonate everywhere.

  • Gillum was one of the only Democrats running for Governor who have come out in favor of repealing Stand Your Ground, a racist law that continues to be used to justify the murders of black men in the state.
  • After marriage equality became legal federally, Gillum welcomed couples looking to get married to Tallahassee when other Florida counties were refusing to issue marriage licenses.
  • He has been a consistent critic of the Trump administration’s cruel and immoral immigration policies. And he’s running against the NRA, with a record fighting and winning against the organization in a case to keep guns out of Tallahassee’s parks.

We were incredibly proud to endorse Andrew last month, after Florida Indivisibles nominated him for national endorsement, and our supporters across the state voted to back him. This work was supported by on-the-ground organizing from local groups led by communities of color — including Dream Defenders, FLIC Votes, New Florida Majority, and Organize Florida — that invested early in Andrew’s campaign even as many doubted his “electability.” Gillum’s campaign was also nationally endorsed by Collective PAC, NextGen America, CPD Action, Our Revolution, and People for the American Way.

We’re proud to have been a part of this broad coalition of organizations who helped ensure Floridians have a real choice and a real vision for the future of their state — who know that representation matters, and who helped make this historic moment possible.

Getting involved in primaries requires us to overcome our fears. It requires us to reimagine what it means to win with our movement’s values. It requires that we dare to believe we can win with an unabashedly progressive platform, not settling for establishment-backed, flush with cash candidates. Together, working shoulder to shoulder with folks across the state, here’s what we accomplished to show our support for the next Governor of Florida:

  • National volunteers made nearly 30,000 calls to voters and sent more than 110,000 texts
  • Indivisible Action Tampa Bay and Indivisible East Hillsboro canvassed in Hillsboro and Volusia counties, knocking on more than 1,000 doors!
  • We invested $100,000 in digital ads (thanks to our small-dollar, grassroots donors!) to build name recognition and nearly $15,000 in direct mail to help target key voters to turn out for Gillum in the final days of the campaign.

This victory confirms what we’re seeing across the South, from Texas to Georgia to Alabama and Florida: unapologetic progressive campaigns that speak to marginalized voters early and often are generating enthusiasm and will be crucial to winning in November.

What we do next

Next weekend, September 8 and 9, Indivisibles across the country will host a national weekend of action. This is a time where activists from across the country come together in a coordinated effort to engage with their friends, families, and neighbors around the importance of participating in upcoming elections.

Indivisibles across the country are planning direct voter contact events for September 8 and 9. We’ll email you next Thursday if there’s an event in your area.

This weekend, we’re calling voters for IndivisiCandidates Ayanna Pressley and Tahirah Amatul-Wadud before the Massachusetts primary next Tuesday, September 4. AND we’re driving calls to voters in Alaska, Maine, Indiana, West Virginia, and North Dakota to call their Senators and stop Trump’s SCOTUS nominee Brett Kavanaugh. AND we’re calling out the vote for even more IndivisiCandidates next weekend for folks who can’t join a local event. That’s thousands of calls — and we need you to help make them. Here’s how you sign up:

  1. Sign up for a call shift right now to make an impact.
  2. When it’s time for your shift, warm up your vocal cords. Log into Hubdialer.
  3. Make. Some. Calls.

Looking ahead

Elections aren’t about a single candidate or a single party. They’re about all of us. As Andrew said in his victory speech: “We can be the David in the situation where there is a Goliath.”

We’ve resisted Trump. And we’re building the blue wave. And as the primaries come to a close (just a few more to go!), we have to redouble our efforts, organize like we’ve never organized before.

By replacing our MoCs with candidates who represent us and our values, we will dramatically change the balance of power in Washington… and stop Trump and the GOP’s agenda once and for all.

Thanks for being with us every step of the way,
The Indivisible Team