on this day … 3/8 The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the conviction of Timothy McVeigh for the bombing of a federal building in Oklahoma City in 1995.


1618 – Johann Kepler discovered the third Law of Planetary Motion.

1702 – England’s Queen Anne took the throne upon the death of King William III.

1782 – The Gnadenhutten massacre took place. About 90 Indians were killed by militiamen in Ohio in retaliation for raids carried out by other Indians.

1853 – The first bronze statue of Andrew Jackson is unveiled in Washington, DC.

1855 – A train passed over the first railway suspension bridge at Niagara Falls, NY.

1862 – The Confederate ironclad “Merrimack” was launched.

1880 – U.S. President Rutherford B. Hayes declared that the United States would have jurisdiction over any canal built across the isthmus of Panama.

1887 – The telescopic fishing rod was patented by Everett Horton.

1894 – A dog license law was enacted in the state of New York. It was the first animal control law in the U.S.

1904 – The Bundestag in Germany lifted the ban on the Jesuit order of priests.

1905 – In Russia, it was reported that the peasant revolt was spreading to Georgia.

1907 – The British House of Commons turned down a women’s suffrage bill.

1909 – Pope Pius X lifted the church ban on interfaith marriages in Hungary.

1910 – In France, Baroness de Laroche became the first woman to obtain a pilot’s license.

1910 – The King of Spain authorized women to attend universities.

1911 – In Europe, International Women’s Day was celebrated for the first time.

1911 – British Minister of Foreign Affairs Edward Gray declared that Britain would not support France in the event of a military conflict.

1917 – Russia’s “February Revolution” began with rioting and strikes in St. Petersburg. The revolution was called the “February Revolution” due to Russia’s use of the Old Style calendar.

1917 – The U.S. Senate voted to limit filibusters by adopting the cloture rule.

1921 – Spanish Premier Eduardo Dato was assassinated while leaving the Parliament in Madrid.

1921 – French troops occupied Dusseldorf.

1933 – Self-liquidating scrip money was issued for the first time at Franklin, IN.

1941 – Martial law was proclaimed in Holland in order to extinguish any anti-Nazi protests.

1942 – During World War II, Japanese forces captured Rangoon, Burma.

1943 – Japanese forces attacked American troops on Hill 700 in Bougainville. The battle lasted five days.

1945 – Phyllis Mae Daley received a commission in the U.S. Navy Nurse Corps. She later became the first African-American nurse to serve duty in World War II.

1946 – In New York City, the “Journal American” became the first commercial business to receive a helicopter license.

1946 – The French naval fleet arrived at Haiphong, Vietnam.

1948 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that religious instruction in public schools was unconstitutional.

1953 – A census bureau report indicated that 239,000 farmers had quit farming over the last 2 years.

1954 – France and Vietnam opened talks in Paris on a treaty to form the state of Indochina.

1954 – Herb McKenley set a world record for the quarter mile when he ran the distance in 46.8 seconds.

1957 – The International Boxing Club was ruled a monopoly putting it in violation of the Sherman Anti-Trust Law.

1959 – Groucho, Chico and Harpo made their final TV appearance together.

1961 – Max Conrad circled the globe in a record time of eight days, 18 hours and 49 minutes in the Piper Aztec.

1965 – The U.S. landed about 3,500 Marines in South Vietnam. They were the first U.S. combat troops to land in Vietnam.

1966 – Australia announced that it would triple the number of troops in Vietnam.

1973 – Two bombs exploded near Trafalgar Square in Great Britain. 234 people were injured.

1982 – The U.S. accused the Soviets of killing 3,000 Afghans with poison gas.

1985 – The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) reported that 407,700 Americans were millionaires. That was more than double the total from just five years before.

1986 – Four French television crew members were abducted in west Beirut. All four were eventually released.

1988 – In Fort Campbell, KY, 17 U.S. soldiers were killed when two Army helicopters collided in midair.

1989 – In Lhasa, Tibet, martial law was declared after three days of protest against Chinese rule.

1999 – The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the conviction of Timothy McVeigh for the bombing of a federal building in Oklahoma City in 1995.

1999 – The White House, under President Bill Clinton, directed the firing of nuclear scientist Wen Ho Lee from his job at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The firing was a result of alleged security violations.

2001 – The U.S. House of Representatives voted for an across-the-board tax cut of nearly $1 trillion over the next decade.

2005 – In norther Chechnya, Chechen rebel leader Aslan Maskhadov was killed during a raid by Russian forces.

1945 Phyllis M Daley is 1st black nurse sworn in as US Navy ensign


Little Known Black History Fact: Phyllis Mae Dailey

D.L. Chandler

During World War II, the United States Navy remained the last military branch to resist the admission of Black soldiers and volunteers. On this day in 1945, Phyllis Mae Dailey became the first Black nurse inducted into the Navy, setting the course for another history-making mark.

Phyllis M. Dailey attended the Lincoln School of Nursing in New York and Teacher’s College at Columbia University. Like many nurses and young people, she hoped to answer the call  to join the military. Dailey attempted to join the Air Force but was denied. Eventually, she made it to the Navy Nurse Corps, knocking down a barrier for three other women.

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Black America Web Featured Video

Althea Gibson is first African American to win Wimbledon


Image result for althea gibson

On July 6, 1957, Althea Gibson claims the women’s singles tennis title at Wimbledon and becomes the first African American to win a championship at London’s All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club.

Gibson was born on August 25, 1927, in Silver, South Carolina, and raised in the Harlem section of New York City. She began playing tennis as a teenager and went on to win the national Black women’s championship twice. At a time when tennis was largely segregated, four-time U.S. Nationals winner Alice Marble advocated on Gibson’s behalf and the 5’11” player was invited to make her United States National Championships (now known as the U.S. Open) debut in 1950. In 1956, Gibson’s tennis career took off and she won the singles title at the French Championships (now known as the French Open)—the first African American to do so—as well as the doubles’ title there. In July 1957, Gibson won Wimbledon, defeating Darlene Hard, 6-3, 6-2. (In 1975, Arthur Ashe became the first African American man to win the men’s singles title at Wimbledon, when he defeated Jimmy Connors.) In September 1957, she won the U.S. Open, and the Associated Press named her Female Athlete of the Year in 1957 and 1958. During the 1950s, Gibson won 56 singles and doubles titles, including 11 major titles.

Source:

history.com