Lethia Cousins Fleming


LETHIA COUSINS FLEMING: RENOWNED CAMPAIGN ORGANIZER, POLITICIAN & CIVIL RIGHTS ACTIVIST

 POSTED BY JAE JONES –

Lethia Fleming was an African-American campaign organizer, women’s and civil rights activist and politician.

Fleming was born in Tazewell, Virginia to James Archibald and Fannie Taylor Cousins, Lethia Cousins Fleming was educated in Ironton, Ohio and later at Morristown College in Tennessee. Following college, she returned to her home state where she was a suffragist and taught for twenty years, until her marriage to Thomas Wallace Fleming in 1912.

Fleming and her husband moved to Cleveland, where her husband became the city’s first black councilman. After living for two years in the city, Fleming was elected chairwoman of the Board of Lady Managers at the Cleveland Home for Aged Colored People.

She served as a twenty-year employee of the Cuyahoga County Child Welfare Board where she worked following an unsuccessful bid for her husband’s city council seat in 1929. Fleming was also a member on the executive board for the National Association of Colored Women and the National Council of Negro Women, in addition to serving as president of the National Association of Republican Women and executive director of the Republican Colored Women organization.

Though she did not win her husband’s city council seat after his imprisonment, Mrs. Cousins was active in politics on a national and local level. She worked on galvanizing support among African-American women for three Republican presidential candidates. Lethia Fleming died in 1963.

sources:

http://ech.case.edu/cgi/article.pl?id=FLC

 http://www.aaregistry.org/historic_events/view/lethia-fleming-born

In the Library ~ Silent Spring, by Rachel Carson ~ Women’s History Month


repost

Rachel Carson’s book “Silent Spring“, an early voice for our environment in 1962 

Silent Spring

 See why Carson’s analysis is more relevant now than ever.Buy Silent Spring at Amazon.com     

Rachel Carson, writer, scientist, and ecologist, grew up simply in the rural river town of Springdale, Pennsylvania. Her mother bequeathed to her a life-long love of nature and the living world that Rachel expressed first as a writer and later as a student of marine biology. Carson graduated from Pennsylvania College for Women (now Chatham College) in 1929, studied at the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory, and received her MA in zoology from Johns Hopkins University in 1932.

She was hired by the U.S. Bureau of Fisheries to write radio scripts during the Depression and supplemented her income writing feature articles on natural history for the Baltimore Sun. She began a fifteen-year career in the federal service as a scientist and editor in 1936 and rose to become Editor-in-Chief of all publications for the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

She wrote pamphlets on conservation and natural resources and edited scientific articles, but in her free time turned her government research into lyric prose, first as an article “Undersea” (1937, for the Atlantic Monthly), and then in a book, Under the Sea-wind (1941). In 1952 she published her prize-winning study of the ocean, The Sea Around Us, which was followed by The Edge of the Sea in 1955. These books constituted a biography of the ocean and made Carson famous as a naturalist and science writer for the public. Carson resigned from government service in 1952 to devote herself to her writing.

She wrote several other articles designed to teach people about the wonder and beauty of the living world, including “Help Your Child to Wonder,” (1956) and “Our Ever-Changing Shore” (1957), and planned another book on the ecology of life. Embedded within all of Carson’s writing was the view that human beings were but one part of nature distinguished primarily by their power to alter it, in some cases irreversibly.

Disturbed by the profligate use of synthetic chemical pesticides after World War II, Carson reluctantly changed her focus in order to warn the public about the long term effects of misusing pesticides. In Silent Spring (1962) she challenged the practices of agricultural scientists and the government, and called for a change in the way humankind viewed the natural world.

Carson was attacked by the chemical industry and some in government as an alarmist, but courageously spoke out to remind us that we are a vulnerable part of the natural world subject to the same damage as the rest of the ecosystem. Testifying before Congress in 1963, Carson called for new policies to protect human health and the environment. Rachel Carson died in 1964 after a long battle against breast cancer. Her witness for the beauty and integrity of life continues to inspire new generations to protect the living world and all its creatures.

QualityHealth.com


By Lisa D. Ellis

Reviewed by QualityHealth.com Medical Advisory Board

If you suffer from asthma, it may be in your best interest to avoid certain foods, according to research out of National Jewish Health, a Denver, CO hospital that focuses on respiratory health.

The scientists from the study conducted a comprehensive study on food allergies. They looked at blood serum levels among children and adults to determine their sensitivity to some common foods. Among their findings, which were published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology in fall 2010, was the fact that people diagnosed with asthma have a much higher risk of experiencing food allergies than their counterparts. Additionally, the more severe the asthma, the more likely the food allergy risk.

Which Comes First?

While the link between food allergies and asthma is clear, researchers weren’t able to determine which comes first or whether a person was more prone to one condition than the other. And exactly what trigger food allergies and asthma varies from person to person.

Common Foods that Exacerbate Asthma

For this research effort, scientists focused their attention on four of the most common allergy triggers:

1.Shrimp. An allergy to shrimp and shellfish is a widespread concern that affects people of all ages. If you’re highly sensitive to this allergen, even breathing in air near the shellfish is cooking can trigger a reaction to the protein released in the steam.

2.Peanuts. Peanut allergies have been on the rise in recent years, and children are at an increased risk for this problem. Avoiding peanut products can be challenging, since peanuts are used in many popular foods and dishes and their presence isn’t always obvious. This ingredient can also be found in everything from salad dressings, puddings, sauces, and cookies to some vegetarian meat substitutes. Cross-contamination in the manufacturing process can even put you at risk for reacting to non-peanut products.

3.Milk: Milk allergies are much more common in children than in adults. However, if you do suffer from a milk allergy, you’ll need to be on the lookout for hidden sources of this trigger, such as meats and canned tuna fish that have a milk protein as a binder, and restaurants that use butter to grill steaks. In addition, deli meats may be sliced using the same equipment. Therefore, be sure to read labels and ask lots of questions when shopping or eating out.

4.Eggs. Gelatin, yeast, and baking powder are viable egg substitutes for some recipes. But you’ll also need to be on the lookout for hidden eggs sources. Some specialty drinks, baked goods, pastas, egg substitutes, and even pretzels can sometimes be made with eggs. Therefore, read labels before you eat. Also, keep in mind that the influenza vaccine often contains a small amount of egg protein, so you’ll need to ask your doctor if this is safe for you to receive.

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If you’re an avid coffee drinker, you may be looking for ways to kick the habit. But before you put down that mug for good, there’s something you should know: This caffeinated beverage may actually…  http://click.mail.qualityhealth.com/?qs=334753f6906c51b0656c315c4c4da78b52467ff7cdca92b6cbd1d22d601492489fc7aff26a77a249

By Laurie Saloman

Reviewed by QualityHealth’s Medical Advisory Board

It’s one of life’s ironies that the shiny, oily skin you battled in your youth tends to get dry and flaky as you sail toward midlife. Some drying is a natural consequence of agingé after all, the hormones responsible for seeing you through puberty (and supplying you with teenage acne) thankfully have died down. And dry skin isn’t only a facial problem-rough, flaky skin can appear anywhere on our bodies. Often our habits and lifestyle worsen the problem. Here’s how to combat it:

Don’t be a bathing beauty. According to the Mayo Clinic, the longer you lie in a hot bath or stand under a steamy shower, the more oils are lost from your skin. Try to be in and out in less than 15 minutes, and use warm, not hot, water.

Choose facial soap carefully. Skip the harsh soap you use on the rest of your body. Pick a soap especially formulated for facial skin, such as a cleansing cream or gel. If your skin feels tight after using a cleanser, find another one.

Apply a moisturizer. Your skin emits water, causing dryness, but moisturizers seal it in. Look for a thicker moisturizer if your problem is severe, or choose makeup that contains a moisturizer and wear it over your regular facial moisturizer. You can even apply a little oil to your skin if you don’t have a problem with acne. The best time to moisturize? Right after you wash your face or step out of the shower. Pat or blot your skin dry-harsh rubbing will remove too much moisture-and apply your moisturizer all over to seal water inside the surface cells of your skin.

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image: internet

history… march 21


1349 – 3,000 Jews were killed in Black Death riots in Efurt Germany.

1556 – Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury, was burned at the stake at Oxford after retracting the last of seven recantations that same day.

1788 – Almost the entire city of New Orleans, LA, was destroyed by fire. 856 buildings were destroyed.

1790 – Thomas Jefferson reported to U.S. President George Washington as the new secretary of state.

1804 – The French civil code, the Code Napoleon, was adopted.

1824 – A fire at a Cairo ammunitions dump killed 4,000 horses.

1826 – The Rensselaer School in Troy, NY, was incorporated. The school became known as Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and was the first engineering college in the U.S.

1835 – Charles Darwin & Mariano Gonzales met at Portillo Pass.

1851 – Emperor Tu Duc ordered that Christian priests be put to death.

1851 – Yosemite Valley was discovered in California.

1857 – An earthquake hit Tokyo killing about 107,000.

1858 – British forces in India lift the siege of Lucknow, ending the Indian Mutiny.

1859 – In Philadelphia, the first Zoological Society was incorporated.

1868 – The Sorosos club for professional women was formed in New York City by Jennie June. It was the first of its kind.

1871 – Journalist Henry M Stanley began his famous expedition to Africa.

1902 – Romain Roland’s play “The 4th of July” premiered in Paris.

1902 – In New York, three Park Avenue mansions were destroyed when a subway tunnel roof caved in.

1904 – The British Parliament vetoed a proposal to send Chinese workers to Transvaal.

1905 – Sterilization legislation was passed in the State of Pennsylvania. The governor vetoed the measure.

1906 – Ohio passed a law that prohibited hazing by fraternities after two fatalities.

1907 – The U.S. Marines landed in Honduras to protect American interests in the war with Nicaragua.

1907 – The first Parliament of Transvaal met in Pretoria.

1908 – A passenger was carried in a bi-plane for the first time by Henri Farman of France.

1909 – Russia withdrew its support for Serbia and recognized the Austrian annexation of Bosnia-Herzegovina. Serbia accepted Austrian control over Bosnia-Herzegovina on March 31, 1909.

1910 – The U.S. Senate granted ex-President Teddy Roosevelt a yearly pension of $10,000.

1918 – During World War I, the Germans launched the Somme Offensive.

1925 – The state of Tennessee enacted the Butler Act. It was a law that made it a crime for a teacher in any state-supported public school to teach any theory that was in contradiction to the Bible’s account of man’s creation.

1928 – U.S. President Calvin Coolidge gave the Congressional Medal of Honor to Charles Lindbergh for his first trans-Atlantic flight.

1934 – A fire destroyed Hakodate, Japan, killing about 1,500.

1935 – Incubator ambulance service began in Chicago, IL.

1941 – The last Italian post in East Libya, North Africa, fell to the British.

1945 – During World War II, Allied bombers began four days of raids over Germany.

1946 – The Los Angeles Rams signed Kenny Washington. Washington was the first black player to join a National Football League team since 1933.

1946 – The United Nations set up a temporary headquarters at Hunter College in New York City.

1953 – The Boston Celtics beat Syracuse Nationals (111-105) in four overtimes to eliminate them from the Eastern Division Semifinals. A total of seven players (both teams combined) fouled out of the game.

1955 – NBC-TV presented the first “Colgate Comedy Hour”.

1957 – Shirley Booth made her TV acting debut in “The Hostess with the Mostest” on CBS.

1960 – About 70 people were killed in Sharpeville, South Africa, when police fired upon demonstrators.

1963 – Alcatraz Island, the federal penitentiary in San Francisco Bay, CA, closed.

1965 – The U.S. launched Ranger 9. It was the last in a series of unmanned lunar explorations.

1965 – More than 3,000 civil rights demonstrators led by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. began a march from Selma to Montgomery, AL.

1966 – In New York, demolition work began to clear thirteen square blocks for the construction of the original World Trade Center.

1971 – Two U.S. platoons in Vietnam refused their orders to advance.

1972 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that states could not require one year of residency for voting eligibility.

1974 – In Londone, an attempt was made to kidnap Princess Anne on the Mall.

1980 – U.S. President Jimmy Carter announced to the U.S. Olympic Team that they would not participate in the 1980 Summer Games in Moscow as a boycott against Soviet intervention in Afghanistan.

1980 – On the TV show “Dallas”, J.R. Ewing was shot.

1982 – The movie “Annie” premiered.

1982 – The United States, U.K. and other Western countries condemned the Soviet intervention in Afghanistan.

1984 – A Soviet submarine crashed into the USS Kitty Hawk off the coast of Japan.

1985 – Larry Flynt offered to sell his pornography empire for $26 million or “Hustler” magazine alone for $18 million.

1985 – Police in Langa, South Africa, opened fire on blacks marching to mark the 25th anniversary of the Sharpeville shootings. At least 21 demonstrators were killed.

1989 – Randall Dale Adams was released from a Texas prison after his conviction was overturned. The documentary “The Thin Blue Line” had challenged evidence of Adams’ conviction for killing a police officer.

1990 – “Normal Life” with Moon Unit & Dweezil Zappa premiered on CBS-TV.

1990 – Australian businessman Alan Bond sold Van Gogh’s “Irises” to the Gerry Museum. Bond had purchased the painting for $53.9 million in 1987.

1990 – “Sydney” starring Valerie Bertinelli premiered on CBS-TV.

1990 – Namibia became independent of South Africa.

1991 – 27 people were lost at sea when two U.S. Navy anti-submarine planes collided.

1991 – The U.N. Security Council lifted the food embargo against Iraq.

1994 – Dudley Moore was arrested for hitting his girlfriend.

1994 – Steven Spielberg won his first Oscars. They were for best picture and best director for “Schindler’s List.”

1994 – Wayne Gretzky tied Gordie Howe‘s NHL record of 801 goals.

1994 – Bill Gates of Microsoft and Craig McCaw of McCaw Cellular Communications announced a $9 billion plan that would send 840 satellites into orbit to relay information around the globe.

1995 – New Jersey officially dedicated the Howard Stern Rest Area along Route 295.

1995 – Tokyo police raided the headquarters of Aum Shinrikyo in search of evidence to link the cult to the Sarin gas released on five Tokyo subway trains.

1999 – Israel’s Supreme Court rejected the final effort to have American Samuel Sheinbein returned to the U.S. to face murder charges for killing Alfred Tello, Jr. Under a plea bargain Sheinbein was sentenced to 24 years in prison.

2000 – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration had overstepped its regulatory authority when it attempted to restrict the marketing of cigarettes to youngsters.

2001 – Nintendo released Game Boy Advance.

2002 – In Pakistan, Ahmed Omar Saeed Sheikh was charged with murder for his role in the kidnapping of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pear. Three other Islamic militants that were in custody were also charged along with seven more accomplices that were still at large.

2002 – In Paris, an 1825 print by French inventor Joseph Nicephore Niepce was sold for $443,220. The print, of a man leading a horse, was the earliest recorded image taken by photographic means.

2003 – It was reported that the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed up 235.27 (2.8%) at 8,521.97. It was the strongest weekly gain in more than 20 years.

2016 – It was reported that the Kepler space telescope had captured the visible light of a “shock breakout” when the star KSN 2011a exploded. It was the first time an exploding star’s brilliant flash shockwave had been captured.

on-this-day.com

Spring – did you know? … Our Environment


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Climate Change chief victims of global warming are women, we grow the food, walk miles for water, and gather the firewood.

Fend off Allergies … by eating more leafy greens, having high levels of folic acid may decrease your risk of wheezing and silence some genes, including those of the immune system. author, Elizabeth Matsui MD

Making a glass jar impacts our environment, you have to burn a gas furnace 24hrs at 2000 degrees, this consumes a  huge amount of energy.

According to the WTC wiping  your feet off before home entry can reduce tracking pesticides by 25%, removing shoes can cut the amount of dust by 10 times, clean carpets every 18months instead of every 12months and save $300

the EPA states the air indoors is 2 to 5times more polluted, install smoke/carbon monoxide detectors, open windows daily, buy air cleaning plants, English ivy, Philodendron, spider; green cleaning recipes at Planetgreen.discovery.com

Rachel Carson‘s book Silent Spring, an early voice for our environment in 1962..get it

Buy local … less packaging if you buy local, more fresh tasty choices …support local farmer’s markets and community gardens

Raising Beef accounts for 18% of global warming emissions worldwide

You can reduce your carbon footprint just by switching to vegetarian meals for 1day, save about 860calories &9pounds of carbon,if done for 2weeks, a reduction of carbon by 122pounds and 12,460calories, losing about 3lbs or more.

So, this post is 11 + yrs old so the numbers must be staggering now