Tag Archives: health

Mindful Behavior … Stop Smoking … new beginnings


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Mindful behavior … Stop smoking

a repost

I believe that great information makes us think – hopefully starts a conversation as well as makes us take positive action. We have all heard about the current political noise going on in California and possibly other states concerning taxing cigarettes; a move that Washington State decided was a good idea deciding folks must pay both the cigarette tax and the use tax, which goes directly to the Department of Revenue. The art of Mindful behavior takes some a mere moment while others a few hundred tries but … it can be done.

As a parent and an ex-smoker (cold turkey) for well over 15yrs, the idea of taxing cigarettes is a good idea though no revenue will benefit the state itself, it will help others in the different ways the act of smoking affects our lives. It took becoming a parent to stop along with an increase in allergies and asthmatic symptoms.  My  mindful behavior, and the love of my kids not to mention a long family history of asthma helped so much.  Mindful behavior has a whole lot of angles … by definition or what society thinks of when contemplating the word “behavior”  is a need for guidance or in its totality has to do with the quality of awareness that a person brings to everyday living; learning to control your mind, rather than letting your mind control you.  However, being mindful in this case includes actions that can be stopped, controlled, or at least  altered if you make lifestyle change, reduce stress with exercises, and or find other things to do.

California and other states can or should at least explore subscribing to a Tobacco Tax; the increases can offer win-win-win solutions, especially as they face a severe fiscal crisis and work to balance budgets while preserving essential public services.

  Stop Smoking

In 2009, Orzechowski and Walker, an economic consulting firm said …

$1,712 is the average amount a pack-a-day smoker in the US spends annually

What can $1,712 buy?

** 170 mosquito nets from nothingbutnets.net and prevent malaria transmission to African families.

** Provide 11,900 meals for the nation’s hungry through www.feedingamerica.org

** Donate to local programs to give 10 kids fun and creative after-school options every day for a month.  www.aferschoolalliance.org for tips on finding an organization near you.

OFCCP Anniversary Celebration … 9/25 in memory of EO 11246


President Lyndon B. Johnson and Martin Luther King, Jr.

Register for OFCCP’s 50th Anniversary Celebration held on Friday, September 25, 2015.

September 24, 2015 marks the 50th anniversary of Executive Order 11246 and the establishment of the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs.

Learn more about the history of OFCCP and stay informed about planned celebratory activities across the country in honor of this significant milestone.

In a June 1965 commencement address at Washington, DC’s Howard University, President Lyndon Johnson shared his strong belief in civil rights and nondiscriminatory practices when he said: “Thus it is not enough just to open the gates of opportunity. All our citizens must have the ability to walk through those gates. This is the next and the more profound stage of the battle for civil rights. We seek not just freedom but opportunity. We seek not just legal equity but human ability, not just equality as a right and a theory but equality as a fact and equality as a result.”

On September 24, 1965, President Lyndon Johnson signed Executive Order 11246, granting supervision of federal contract compliance to the Secretary of Labor, and  creating the department’s first Office of Federal Contract Compliance. The EO ordered federal departments and agencies to impose non–discrimination and affirmative action rules in all federal contracts and federally–assisted construction projects. Later, on October 5, 1978, President Jimmy Carter consolidated all affirmative action enforcement actions into DOL by signing into law Executive Order 12086.

History of Executive Order 11246

Mississippi, 1964


Civil Rights Workers.jpg

 

MichaelSchwerner, Andrew Goodman, and James Chaney had only just begun working on the Freedom Summer campaign to register black Mississippians to vote when they suddenly disappeared.

Schwerner and Goodman were two Jewish men from New York—they had been there less than a week—and Chaney was a local black activist. They had just finished investigating the bombing of a nearby church when theywere taken into custody under false pretenses, and never again seen by their fellow volunteers.The disappearance of these three men sparked national outrage, and the FBI converged on Mississippi to investigate. They discovered that on June 21, 1964, immediately upon being released from custody, the young activists had been brutally beaten and murdered by a Ku Klux Klan lynch mob. The FBI’s investigation led to the first successful federal prosecution of a civil rights case in Mississippi.

 the anniversary of the day we lost these brave defenders of civil rights. Here are two things you can do to commemorate this day:

First, pledge to vote this November to honor the sacrifices made by Freedom Summer activists for our right to vote.

Then, share this graphic on Facebook to honor these three fallen activists.

Share this graphic
The circumstances under which we fight may have changed, but our values remain constant. All Americans, regardless of income or the color of their skin, must be able to freely exercise their constitutional right to vote.

The work of civil rights activists to protect this right did not stop when Freedom Summer ended, or even with the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. As long as there are legislators fighting to keep our most vulnerable populations away from the polls, our work and our struggle continues.

Join your voice with your fellow champions of civil and human rights. Take just one minute to do these things:

Pledge to exercise your hard-won right to vote in November.

http://action.naacp.org/My-Vote-2014

Share this graphic to honor the ongoing fight for voting rights.

http://action.naacp.org/Honor-Freedom-Summer

In solidarity,

Lorraine C. Miller
Interim President and CEO
NAACP

Caring for Someone with Cancer: Food Safety Tips


Food Safety for People with Cancer

Cancer patients are at a greater risk of suffering from a foodborne illness because of their weakened immune systems. Cancer treatments, such as radiation and chemotherapy, weaken the body’s immune system by affecting the blood cells that protect against disease and germs. This condition is known as neutropenia.

As a result, their body cannot fight infection, foreign substances, and disease, as well as a healthy person’s body can. Because of this higher risk, people with cancer or those preparing food for them must practice proper food-handling techniques to kill pathogens and avoid cross-contamination. Foodborne illness, which is caused by eating food that contains harmful bacteria, parasites, or viruses, can be severe and sometimes deadly. For example, cancer patients are 53% more likely to die from an adenovirus infection, whereas those with healthy immune systems rarely succumb to the virus.

What You Can Do
Learn about safety tips for those at increased risk of foodborne illness. Those living with cancer should always follow the four steps:

Clean: Wash hands and surfaces often

Separate: Separate raw meat and poultry from ready-to-eat foods

Cook: Cook food to the right temperatures

Chill: Chill raw meat and poultry as well as cooked leftovers promptly (within 2 hours)

If you or someone you care for receives prepared meals, visit our home-delivered meals page for information on how to keep these safe.

Download our FoodKeeper application to make sure you are storing food and beverages properly, and using them within recommended storage guidelines.
More Information
Food Safety for People with Cancer (FDA)
A need-to-know guide for people who have been diagnosed with cancer.

 

 

 

 

National HIV Testing Day — June 27


National HIV Testing Day on June 27 is a reminder to get tested. Enter your ZIP code and find a testing site near you.
Visit AIDS.gov to learn more about HIV/AIDS, including how to reduce your risk and available treatment options.
Download or order a FREE print copy of the following publications on USA.gov: