Tag Archives: Food

On This Day ~~ Haiti … In memory


Massive earthquake strikes Haiti, 2010

On this day in 2010, a magnitude 7.0 earthquake devastates the Caribbean island nation of Haiti. The quake, which was the strongest to strike the region in more than 200 years, left over 200,000 people dead and some 895,000 Haitians homeless.

The earthquake hit southern Haiti at 4:53 p.m. local time. The nation’s capital, Port-au-Prince, a densely populated city located about 15 miles from the quake’s epicenter, suffered widespread devastation. Countless dwellings were reduced to rubble, while hospitals, churches and schools collapsed and roads were blocked with debris. Numerous government structures were heavily damaged or destroyed, including the presidential palace, parliament building and main prison. (At the time of the quake, Haiti lacked a national building code, and many structures were shoddily constructed.) In the aftermath of the quake, amidst fears that victims’ decomposing corpses could spread disease, trucks picked up thousands of bodies and dumped them into mass graves.

Even before the earthquake, Haiti, which occupies the western third of the island of Hispaniola (the Dominican Republic occupies the other two-thirds), was the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, with 80 percent of its 9 million residents existing in poverty. Political corruption and violence, disease, malnutrition and limited access to education were a way of life for many in Haiti, which gained its independence from France in an 1804 slave revolt.

A large-scale, international relief operation was launched soon after the quake hit, with the United States taking charge and sending thousands of military troops to Haiti to deliver supplies, assist with search-and-rescue efforts and help maintain order. Relief efforts initially were hampered by earthquake damage to roads, communication systems and the Port-au-Prince airport and main port.

Governments and individuals around the world made donations and pledges of aid to Haiti totaling billions of dollars. However, on the first-year anniversary of the disaster, reconstruction efforts were still in their infancy. Thousands of people left homeless by the quake were living in tents, and only a small portion of the heavy debris resulting from the disaster had been cleared.

resource: history.com

i would like to add that the problem is getting access to education due to dollars and the fact that they are mostly privately run least we talk about the limited jobs in public schools and wages tend to be lower in non-public schools.

The Story of the Horse


The Story of the HorseIn any discussion of the history of humankind, it becomes quickly apparent that this narrative would be utterly different without the inclusion of horses.

In our July/August 2015 issue, executive editor Jarrett A. Lobell and online editor Eric A. Powell bring us a special section, “The Story of the Horse,” in which they explore the unique roles that this animal has played in diverse areas of the human experience, and the evolving relationship we have had with horses across the millennia.

to get the complete article click on the link above!

Cyclosporiasis: Most U.S. cases reported in warmer months


Cyclosporiasis is an intestinal illness caused by the protozoan (unicellular) parasite Cyclospora cayetanensis.

Cyclosporiasis can occur at any time of the year, but most of the reported cases and outbreaks in the United States occur during the spring and summer months, particularly from May through August. About half of all U.S. cases that are not associated with a known outbreak occur in people with a recent history of travel outside the United States and Canada.

Cyclosporiasis is acquired by eating food or drinking water that is contaminated with human feces. In the United States, cyclosporiasis outbreaks have been reported almost every year since the mid-1990s and have been associated with various types of imported fresh produce.

Symptoms of cyclosporiasis begin an average of seven days after ingestion of sporulated oocysts (eggs), the infective form of the parasite. The most common symptom is watery diarrhea. Other common symptoms include loss of appetite, nausea, abdominal cramps, weight loss, fatigue, and myalgia (muscle pain); vomiting and low-grade fever also may occur.

Cyclospora infection is diagnosed by examining stool. A special test is required to detect the parasite, so health care professionals should specifically request testing for Cyclospora. Patients might need to provide up to three stool samples collected on different days because even people who show symptoms might not shed enough oocysts in their stool to show up in laboratory testing.

Cyclosporiasis is treated with a common antibiotic. If the infection is not treated, symptoms can last for several weeks to a month or more. There is no vaccine for cyclosporiasis. People can lower the risk of getting cyclosporiasis by avoiding food or water that may have been contaminated with feces. Rinsing fresh produce can reduce—but may not eliminate—the chances of getting cyclosporiasis. Treating food or water with chlorine or iodine is unlikely to kill Cyclospora oocysts. Safe food and water habits are recommended when traveling

“First Amendment ONLY for Christians,” Says Republican Alabama Chief Justice-reminder


QualityHealth.com


By Lisa D. Ellis

Reviewed by QualityHealth.com Medical Advisory Board

If you suffer from asthma, it may be in your best interest to avoid certain foods, according to research out of National Jewish Health, a Denver, CO hospital that focuses on respiratory health.

The scientists from the study conducted a comprehensive study on food allergies. They looked at blood serum levels among children and adults to determine their sensitivity to some common foods. Among their findings, which were published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology in fall 2010, was the fact that people diagnosed with asthma have a much higher risk of experiencing food allergies than their counterparts. Additionally, the more severe the asthma, the more likely the food allergy risk.

Which Comes First?

While the link between food allergies and asthma is clear, researchers weren’t able to determine which comes first or whether a person was more prone to one condition than the other. And exactly what trigger food allergies and asthma varies from person to person.

Common Foods that Exacerbate Asthma

For this research effort, scientists focused their attention on four of the most common allergy triggers:

1.Shrimp. An allergy to shrimp and shellfish is a widespread concern that affects people of all ages. If you’re highly sensitive to this allergen, even breathing in air near the shellfish is cooking can trigger a reaction to the protein released in the steam.

2.Peanuts. Peanut allergies have been on the rise in recent years, and children are at an increased risk for this problem. Avoiding peanut products can be challenging, since peanuts are used in many popular foods and dishes and their presence isn’t always obvious. This ingredient can also be found in everything from salad dressings, puddings, sauces, and cookies to some vegetarian meat substitutes. Cross-contamination in the manufacturing process can even put you at risk for reacting to non-peanut products.

3.Milk: Milk allergies are much more common in children than in adults. However, if you do suffer from a milk allergy, you’ll need to be on the lookout for hidden sources of this trigger, such as meats and canned tuna fish that have a milk protein as a binder, and restaurants that use butter to grill steaks. In addition, deli meats may be sliced using the same equipment. Therefore, be sure to read labels and ask lots of questions when shopping or eating out.

4.Eggs. Gelatin, yeast, and baking powder are viable egg substitutes for some recipes. But you’ll also need to be on the lookout for hidden eggs sources. Some specialty drinks, baked goods, pastas, egg substitutes, and even pretzels can sometimes be made with eggs. Therefore, read labels before you eat. Also, keep in mind that the influenza vaccine often contains a small amount of egg protein, so you’ll need to ask your doctor if this is safe for you to receive.

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If you’re an avid coffee drinker, you may be looking for ways to kick the habit. But before you put down that mug for good, there’s something you should know: This caffeinated beverage may actually…  http://click.mail.qualityhealth.com/?qs=334753f6906c51b0656c315c4c4da78b52467ff7cdca92b6cbd1d22d601492489fc7aff26a77a249

By Laurie Saloman

Reviewed by QualityHealth’s Medical Advisory Board

It’s one of life’s ironies that the shiny, oily skin you battled in your youth tends to get dry and flaky as you sail toward midlife. Some drying is a natural consequence of agingé after all, the hormones responsible for seeing you through puberty (and supplying you with teenage acne) thankfully have died down. And dry skin isn’t only a facial problem-rough, flaky skin can appear anywhere on our bodies. Often our habits and lifestyle worsen the problem. Here’s how to combat it:

Don’t be a bathing beauty. According to the Mayo Clinic, the longer you lie in a hot bath or stand under a steamy shower, the more oils are lost from your skin. Try to be in and out in less than 15 minutes, and use warm, not hot, water.

Choose facial soap carefully. Skip the harsh soap you use on the rest of your body. Pick a soap especially formulated for facial skin, such as a cleansing cream or gel. If your skin feels tight after using a cleanser, find another one.

Apply a moisturizer. Your skin emits water, causing dryness, but moisturizers seal it in. Look for a thicker moisturizer if your problem is severe, or choose makeup that contains a moisturizer and wear it over your regular facial moisturizer. You can even apply a little oil to your skin if you don’t have a problem with acne. The best time to moisturize? Right after you wash your face or step out of the shower. Pat or blot your skin dry-harsh rubbing will remove too much moisture-and apply your moisturizer all over to seal water inside the surface cells of your skin.

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image: internet