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By Lisa D. Ellis

Reviewed by QualityHealth.com Medical Advisory Board

If you suffer from asthma, it may be in your best interest to avoid certain foods, according to research out of National Jewish Health, a Denver, CO hospital that focuses on respiratory health.

The scientists from the study conducted a comprehensive study on food allergies. They looked at blood serum levels among children and adults to determine their sensitivity to some common foods. Among their findings, which were published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology in fall 2010, was the fact that people diagnosed with asthma have a much higher risk of experiencing food allergies than their counterparts. Additionally, the more severe the asthma, the more likely the food allergy risk.

Which Comes First?

While the link between food allergies and asthma is clear, researchers weren’t able to determine which comes first or whether a person was more prone to one condition than the other. And exactly what trigger food allergies and asthma varies from person to person.

Common Foods that Exacerbate Asthma

For this research effort, scientists focused their attention on four of the most common allergy triggers:

1.Shrimp. An allergy to shrimp and shellfish is a widespread concern that affects people of all ages. If you’re highly sensitive to this allergen, even breathing in air near the shellfish is cooking can trigger a reaction to the protein released in the steam.

2.Peanuts. Peanut allergies have been on the rise in recent years, and children are at an increased risk for this problem. Avoiding peanut products can be challenging, since peanuts are used in many popular foods and dishes and their presence isn’t always obvious. This ingredient can also be found in everything from salad dressings, puddings, sauces, and cookies to some vegetarian meat substitutes. Cross-contamination in the manufacturing process can even put you at risk for reacting to non-peanut products.

3.Milk: Milk allergies are much more common in children than in adults. However, if you do suffer from a milk allergy, you’ll need to be on the lookout for hidden sources of this trigger, such as meats and canned tuna fish that have a milk protein as a binder, and restaurants that use butter to grill steaks. In addition, deli meats may be sliced using the same equipment. Therefore, be sure to read labels and ask lots of questions when shopping or eating out.

4.Eggs. Gelatin, yeast, and baking powder are viable egg substitutes for some recipes. But you’ll also need to be on the lookout for hidden eggs sources. Some specialty drinks, baked goods, pastas, egg substitutes, and even pretzels can sometimes be made with eggs. Therefore, read labels before you eat. Also, keep in mind that the influenza vaccine often contains a small amount of egg protein, so you’ll need to ask your doctor if this is safe for you to receive.

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If you’re an avid coffee drinker, you may be looking for ways to kick the habit. But before you put down that mug for good, there’s something you should know: This caffeinated beverage may actually…  http://click.mail.qualityhealth.com/?qs=334753f6906c51b0656c315c4c4da78b52467ff7cdca92b6cbd1d22d601492489fc7aff26a77a249

By Laurie Saloman

Reviewed by QualityHealth’s Medical Advisory Board

It’s one of life’s ironies that the shiny, oily skin you battled in your youth tends to get dry and flaky as you sail toward midlife. Some drying is a natural consequence of agingé after all, the hormones responsible for seeing you through puberty (and supplying you with teenage acne) thankfully have died down. And dry skin isn’t only a facial problem-rough, flaky skin can appear anywhere on our bodies. Often our habits and lifestyle worsen the problem. Here’s how to combat it:

Don’t be a bathing beauty. According to the Mayo Clinic, the longer you lie in a hot bath or stand under a steamy shower, the more oils are lost from your skin. Try to be in and out in less than 15 minutes, and use warm, not hot, water.

Choose facial soap carefully. Skip the harsh soap you use on the rest of your body. Pick a soap especially formulated for facial skin, such as a cleansing cream or gel. If your skin feels tight after using a cleanser, find another one.

Apply a moisturizer. Your skin emits water, causing dryness, but moisturizers seal it in. Look for a thicker moisturizer if your problem is severe, or choose makeup that contains a moisturizer and wear it over your regular facial moisturizer. You can even apply a little oil to your skin if you don’t have a problem with acne. The best time to moisturize? Right after you wash your face or step out of the shower. Pat or blot your skin dry-harsh rubbing will remove too much moisture-and apply your moisturizer all over to seal water inside the surface cells of your skin.

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