Tag Archives: Plant

Help us give the gift of life


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Thank you for your support this year. Because of you we are closer to metting our goal of planting ten million trees within the next five years.

 

In the new year, you can give the gift of a sustainable future by donating to plant trees in the world’s poorest communities.

Trees bring joy and festivity into people’s homes, it’s a symbol of new life.

But for many people, trees aren’t just about joy and celebration. They’re about providing food for their children, securing their land from erosion and feeding their livestock. They’re about providing long-term economic and environmental sustainability.

Each dollar you donate will help plant one tree.

Now, through Earth Day Network’s Canopy Project, you can even donate to plant a plot of trees in someone’s name and send it as a gift.

Your gift will help people and the planet we share.

Give the gift of trees today! 

-The Earth Day Network Team

P.S. – Check out the special gifts from our partner

The 7 Best Houseplants for Beginners


Plants You Can’t Kill

By Jon VanZile

These houseplants are the best place to start your collection. They are all easy to grow and can generally withstand erratic watering, uneven or bad light, and fluctuating temperatures. They’ll thrive in dorm rooms, offices and sometimes even dismal corners.

Epipremnum-aureum-poznan-palmiarnia-abrimaalGolden pothos vine (Epipremnum pinnatum ‘aureum’)

There’s a reason this vine is one of the most popular hanging plants around. In its native habitat, golden pothos grows into a tree-swallowing monster with huge yellow and green leaves. As a houseplant, the plant will grow aggressively from pots or trailing baskets with minimal care. They will easily root in a simple glass of water. With better care, large, mottled, mature leaves may develop.

ChlorophytumCapenseSpider plant (Chlorophytum)

A well-grown spider plant is a magnificent thing. The plant grows easily in baskets or atop columns, with arching leaves. The variegated variety is by far the most common. Over time, a mature plant will send out plantlets or offsets on long stems that form an impressive hanging display. These plantlets can be easily potted up to create new specimens. Spider plants are not picky about water, light or temperature.

Snake_plantSnake plant and mother-in-law’s tongue (Sansevieria trifasciata and S. trifasciata laurentii)

Actually in the same family that includes dracaena and liriope, there are many varieties of sansevieria that are exceptionally tough. They like plenty of light, but they can handle less if necessary and they aren’t too particular about watering—providing there isn’t too much. When repotting is necessary, the main clump can be easily divided. These plants are striking additions to a collection. The snake plant features green on green bands on sword-like leaves, while the mother-in-law’s tongue has yellow leaf margins.

Dracaena species

There are many varieties of dracaena suitable for home growth. The D. Draco and D. Marginata are wonderfully easy plants that tolerate a wide variety of conditions. These plants feature arching leaves from a woody stem. Dracaena leaves can be green, yellow and green, or even tri-colored. Also a member of the agave family, they like to be regularly watered in the summer and almost left dry throughout the winter. D. Fragrans is often used to make the popular Ti plants, or false palms.

Succulents and Cacti

There are dozens of varieties of succulents and desert cacti flooding into garden centers and grocery stores. In general, succulents are desert plants with thick, fleshy leaves. Some of them have spines, and some none. Agave is an example of a popular succulent, along with aloe and popular echeveria rosettes. Cacti generally have spines and interesting leaf structures, including barrels, paddles and columns. As a class, succulents and cacti are slow growing and will withstand tremendous abuse. They do best with bright light, well-drained pots and little water. In the right placement, these are plants that truly thrive on neglect.

Bromeliad3.jpgBromeliads

These plants have gained an unfair reputation, probably because of the difficulty required to coax a bloom from a bromeliad. It’s true that making these jungle plants bloom in the house is a tricky task. They require copious warmth and water, along with high humidity and filtered light, to produce their showy flower spikes. However, many species of bromeliads have beautiful leaves that are attractive by themselves. Bromeliads plants are usually watered by filling the central cup. They require little fertilizer, and when pups appear around the base of the plant, these can be potted up to increase your collection.

Lucky_bambooLucky bamboo (Dracaena sanderiana)

Technically a dracaena species, lucky bamboo is the perennial office plant. Untold pots of these thrive in awful conditions, sporadically watered with bad lighting and poor air quality. Nevertheless, lucky bamboo lives on. These make wonderful gift plants, and many people believe they bring good luck and enhance the chi, or energy, of their surroundings.

You can give life, plant trees


Plant trees where they’re needed most. Donate today!

Thanks to you, The Canopy Project has improved thousands of lives by planting trees in impoverished communities around the world.

But our work is not done yet.

Fall is planting season, and with your help, we can advance closer to our goal of planting 10 million trees over 5 years. Together, we can make this happen.

Let’s keep the momentum going. Make a contribution today! You can better the lives of some of the world’s most vulnerable citizens.

You can help the farmer in Uganda, who thanked us for planting trees to fence his land, saving his small farm from erosion, and asked if we could provide more trees to help feed his goats.

You can help the women and girls of Ethiopia, where deforestation forces them farther and farther from their homes to collect wood for fuel, often keeping the girls from attending school.

And you can help the villager in Haiti still struggling to recover from the devastating earthquake in 2010.

Just a small contribution can strengthen these lives and improve communities. Every dollar you give helps us to plant another tree.

Donate today to help the people who need it the most.

Thank you for your support.

-The Earth Day Network Team

The Canopy Project


I just wanted to let you know that we are $4,500 dollars away from our goal! As Earth Day Network’s tree planting program coordinator I routinely hear stories of thanks and gratitude from the men, women, and children who are impacted by our plantings. Recently, I was told by Henry Kunduba, a farmer from Uganda, that the trees EDN helped him plant has already improved his crop yields – “I’m happy to have planted Calliandra trees as a fence on my land. I also use them to feed my goats. I need more Calliandra so that I can plant on all my land.”  Through your support, we can continue to help people like Henry improve their livelihoods and provide for their families.

— John

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            Help us fight poverty and plant trees in Haiti and Senegal!

We have some good news! An anonymous donor has pledged $15,000 to help us plant trees IF we can match that gift with another $15,000! Please help us reach that goal. Here’s what your donation will do right now:

In Haiti: In the aftermath of the magnitude 7.0 earthquake that struck in 2010, Haiti has worked hard to rebuild and has made significant strides in agriculture, education and economic growth, but there’s much more work to be done. Erosion and a dependence on wood for cooking and heating have devastated the country’s tree canopy. Less than 2% of Haiti’s original forests remain, and most of its people are desperately poor.

Earth Day Network works with local partners to integrate tree planting with farming and community training. Fruit trees and fast-growing plants provide food and biofuel, harvested through sustainable agroforestry practices. Each dollar donated helps Haiti feed its people.

In Senegal: Since 1990, Senegal has lost over 675,000 hectares of pristine primary forest, the equivalent of cutting down a forest the size of Delaware. Each year more and more trees are cut to fuel timber and biofuel industries. As a result, Senegal’s soil has been destabilized and its thousands of species of flora and fauna are being threatened.

By planting trees, The Canopy Project helps restore Senegal’s tree canopy, providing habitats for threatened animals, and fruits used to produce sustainable electricity to run homes, produce goods, and improve family livelihoods.

But we need your help now! The tree planting season in Senegal must coincide with the short rainy season of July through September. Each dollar donated helps preserve biodiversity and adds trees in the most needy villages and farms of Senegal.

Time is short and there is much work to be done. Please help us reach our goal today!

— The Earth Day Network Team

Plant trees to fight poverty


 

Last month, Earth Day Network made a major commitment through the Global Poverty Project: We’re going to plant 10 million trees in impoverished areas around the world in five years.  And we need your help to make it happen.

For every dollar you donate, we’ll plant one tree.

Why trees? Trees reverse the impacts of land degradation and provide food, energy and income, helping communities to achieve long-term economic and environmental sustainability. Trees also filter the air and help stave off the effects of climate change.  

With the reality of increasingly unpredictable weather patterns and more frequent and violent storms and floods, tree cover to prevent devastating soil erosion has never been more important.

Donate today to plant trees where they’re needed most.

It’s the world’s poor whose health and livelihoods suffer the most from the effects of environmental degradation. But while those in poverty bear the brunt of these environmental problems, they contribute very little to the problems’ causes. That’s unjust, and we have to do something about it.

You can do something about it through your generous donation to plant trees in the areas of the world where they’ll do the most good for the most vulnerable populations.

The planet is losing nearly 15,000,000 hectares of forest each year. Through our Canopy Project, Earth Day Network has been working tirelessly to reverse this devastating deforestation by planting millions of trees in places like Uganda, Brazil, Haiti, Mexico and more.

These trees are not only healing the planet, they’re mending local economies and improving the quality of life for those living in extreme poverty. But we have to do more. Please consider contributing to this critical effort today.

Thanks for all your support,

Kathleen Rogers
President, Earth Day Networ