Please act to save our lives in Aleppo


Petitioning Angela Merkel

World leaders: Please act to save our lives in Aleppo

Petition by Dr. Hamza Al Khatib
Aleppo, Syrian Arab Republic
693,283
Supporters
I am one of the very last doctors serving the remaining 300,000 citizens of eastern Aleppo.

Atrocities are being committed every day. The Syrian regime and Russian aircraft are systematically targeting civilians and hospitals across the city.

We have seen no real effort from President Obama, Chancellor Merkel or Prime Minister May to prevent the criminal attacks against civilians and our hospitals.

That is why I’ve started this petition. World leaders are not listening to my voice alone. Will you join me and make a call so loud they can’t ignore us?

For five years, we have borne witness as countless patients, friends and colleagues suffered violent, tormented deaths. For five years, the world has stood by and remarked how ‘complicated’ Syria is, while doing little to protect us.

Last month there were 42 attacks on medical facilities in Syria, 15 of which were hospitals in which my colleagues and I work. At this rate, our medical services in Aleppo could be completely destroyed in a month, leaving 300,000 people to die.

What pains me and my fellow doctors the most is choosing who will live and who will die. Young children are sometimes brought into our emergency rooms so badly injured that we have to prioritise those with better chances, or simply don’t have the equipment to help them. A few weeks ago, four newborn babies gasping for air suffocated to death after a blast cut the oxygen supply to their incubators. Their lives ended before they had really begun.

Despite the horror, we choose to be here. We took a pledge to help those in need. We have a duty to remain and help. All we ask now is for Obama, Merkel, May and other world leaders to do their duty, too.

We do not need their tears or sympathy or even prayers, we need them to act. We need them to prove that they are the friends of Syrians.

Please join us in our call. Ask world leaders to save the people of Aleppo.

BREAKING: Gov. Rick Scott looking to remove Aramis Ayala from office!


BREAKING: Gov. Rick Scott might try to remove Florida’s first Black head prosecutor from office simply because she did the right thing1and we have to stop him. Will you sign the petition?

Aramis Ayala is part of the less than one percent of Black women who are head prosecutors in the country. Last week, she took a heroic step and pledged not to seek the death penalty, and Rick Scott wrongfully removed her from a key case–even though Ayala was supported by the victim’s family in her decision. Now, he might be trying to get her out of office permanently?!

This is an attack on democracy and Black political leadership. Aramis Ayala’s bold move is in direct response to the needs of the voters who put her in office. Yet, Gov. Scott is overstepping his authority and sending a scary and unfair message: the voters’ choice in who they elect to serve justice does not matter.

I’m not sure if you saw Rashad’s email from this weekend–but we need as many people as possible to stand up with Aramis Ayala in this moment. Over 40,000 Color of Change members have already called on Gov. Rick Scott to let Ayala do her job–will sign the petition too?

Thanks for taking a stand.

–Scott, and the rest of the Color of Change team

P.S. Here’s the email Rashad sent this weekend:


We must stand with Aramis Ayala. We need real leaders like her.

 

Florida Gov. Rick Scott is undermining justice. He must be stopped.

TAKE ACTION!

 

Aramis Ayala, the first Black woman state attorney in Florida history, just made a heroic move by refusing to seek the death penalty in any case–and Florida Governor Rick Scott removed her from a key case and handed it over to a white prosecutor in another county.2

Even the victim’s family is in support of Ayala’s decision to not pursue the death penalty.3 Gov. Scott is punishing her for doing the right thing and undermining the voters who chose her–and he must be stopped.

In November, Ayala ousted incumbent Jeff Ashton. She ran on a daring and progressive platform in which she championed dramatic changes to the criminal justice system that would shift the power and control from law enforcement to enhancing safety and well-being of community members. As State Attorney, Ayala understands that justice deserves to be in the hands of the people. Now, she’s facing a careless and disrespectful move from a governor who continues to trample on any real progress towards criminal justice reform–we must have her back to make sure other prosecutors follow in her footsteps.

Demand Governor Rick Scott respect the people’s choice, reverse his decision and put State Attorney Aramis Ayala back on the case.

This is about more than just the death penalty. Black communities and our allies have built a movement over the last year to replace the worst prosecutors with leaders who want to change the system from the inside out–like Aramis Ayala and Kim Foxx in Chicago. Just like every other movement that has built power for Black people, this movement is being met with anti-Blackness, right wing resistance, and anti-democratic tactics intended to keep our communities trapped under the leadership of white conservatives.

We’ve seen it before. After the election of the first Black President, we saw a wave of voter suppression laws intended to constrain Black political power and right-wing politicians refusing to let President Obama conduct the most basic aspects of his duties like appointing a Supreme Court Justice. We have to send a clear signal that when it comes to real leaders like Aramis Ayala, we’ve got their backs.

Governor Rick Scott must let state attorney Aramis Ayala do her job. Tell him to reverse his decision NOW.

During his tenure, Governor Rick Scott has repeatedly failed to step up to other state attorneys when they did not serve justice. He shunned the family of Trayvon Martin. In 2012, when 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was killed by cop wannabe George Zimmerman, Governor Scott moved too slowly to pursue justice for the teenage boy and his family. It was only after urgent pleas from protesters and community members that Scott finally stepped up and appointed a special prosecutor. But who he appointed was damaging–Angela Corey–whom he knew would support his “Stand Your Ground” law where he saw fit. Instead of fighting for justice, Corey allowed Zimmerman to get off. Since then, the Governor hasn’t done a thing about the criminalization of Black folks or the laws that allow them to be killed in cold blood.

Yet, Governor Scott did not even wait a day to take State Attorney Aramis Ayala off this crucial case, diminishing and undermining her position as a prosecutor. He is sending a scary and unfair message — the voters’ choice in who they elect to serve real justice does not matter.

Local prosecutors are the most influential decision makers in the criminal justice system and their work has an enormous impact on the lives of the most vulnerable among us. Our communities cannot afford to have elected leaders put their own interests and power above the people. That is why Orange-Osceola County State Attorney Aramis Ayala–someone who will stay committed to making justice a reality for all people–is the kind of leader that we need. We cannot stand by and let someone like Governor Rick Scott silence her and the voters who elected her to fix our criminal justice system. Let’s show up for Ayala’s bravery and integrity.

Sign the petition.

Until Justice is real

Rashad, Arisha, Scott, Clarise, Anay, Enchanta, Malaya, and the rest of the Color of Change Team

References:

  1. “State attorney likely to be booted, WFTV analysts predict,” Orlando Sentinel, 03.19.2017 http://act.colorofchange.org/go/7606?t=9&akid=7138.1174326.ADWpUq
  2. “Gov. Scott appoints special prosecutor after Ayala says she won’t pursue death penalty, ” Orlando Sentinel, 03.16.2017.  http://act.colorofchange.org/go/7602?t=11&akid=7138.1174326.ADWpUq

  3. “Father of Sade Dixon speaks out about prosecutor’s stance on death penalty, ” Fox 35, 03.16.2017.
    http://act.colorofchange.org/go/7603?t=14&akid=7138.1174326.ADWpUq

Hot Spots H20: March 21: Conflict in Yemen Leaves Millions Hungry and Thirsty


The Global Rundown

Yemen hovers at the “point of no return” as conflict leaves millions hungry and thirsty. A United Nations report claims the Syrian government deliberately bombed the Damascus water supply, an event which left 5.5 million people without water for weeks. As the Iraqi army moves to retake Mosul from Islamic State militants, thousands remain trapped inside the Old City district without food or water. A skirmish over grazing land leaves nearly a dozen Kenyan pastoralists dead and several others injured. In India, the government introduces a bill intended to streamline inter-state water disputes.

“We keep on talking about a country that’s on the brink of famine, but for me these numbers highlight that we’re at the point of no return. If things are not done now we are going to be looking back on this and millions of children will have starved to death, and we’ll all have been aware of this for some time. That will shame us as an international community for years to come.” –Mark Kaye, Yemen’s Save the Children spokesperson, in reference to country’s impending famine. Civil war has halted food supply to Yemen and left 7 million on the brink of starvation. The Guardian

By The Numbers

600,000 Number of civilians potentially trapped inside Mosul with Islamic State militants. The Iraqi government is gradually recapturing Mosul, but militants still control several districts—including the densely-populated Old City, where food and water supplies have been cut off for days. Thousands more residents have fled the city. Reuters

10 Number of Kenyan pastoralists who were killed in a gun fight over grazing land. Dozens of others sustained gunshot wounds. Pastoralists have clashed frequently in the past several months as drought in northern Kenya worsens. Reuters

Science, Studies, And Reports

After reviewing video footage, witness accounts, and satellite imagery, the United Nations Commission of Inquiry found the Syrian army responsible for airstrikes that damaged the Damascus water supply in late 2016. The damage, which the Syrian government initially blamed on rebel forces, left 5.5 million people without water for over a month. The New York Times

On The Radar

The Indian government introduced a bill that would establish a single standing tribunal for resolving river water disputes between Indian states. The current system, which requires a separate tribunal for each dispute, has proved largely inefficient. Hindustan Times

The Global Rundown

Yemen hovers at the “point of no return” as conflict leaves millions hungry and thirsty. A United Nations report claims the Syrian government deliberately bombed the Damascus water supply, an event which left 5.5 million people without water for weeks. As the Iraqi army moves to retake Mosul from Islamic State militants, thousands remain trapped inside the Old City district without food or water. A skirmish over grazing land leaves nearly a dozen Kenyan pastoralists dead and several others injured. In India, the government introduces a bill intended to streamline inter-state water disputes.

“We keep on talking about a country that’s on the brink of famine, but for me these numbers highlight that we’re at the point of no return. If things are not done now we are going to be looking back on this and millions of children will have starved to death, and we’ll all have been aware of this for some time. That will shame us as an international community for years to come.” –Mark Kaye, Yemen’s Save the Children spokesperson, in reference to country’s impending famine. Civil war has halted food supply to Yemen and left 7 million on the brink of starvation. The Guardian

By The Numbers

600,000 Number of civilians potentially trapped inside Mosul with Islamic State militants. The Iraqi government is gradually recapturing Mosul, but militants still control several districts—including the densely-populated Old City, where food and water supplies have been cut off for days. Thousands more residents have fled the city. Reuters

10 Number of Kenyan pastoralists who were killed in a gun fight over grazing land. Dozens of others sustained gunshot wounds. Pastoralists have clashed frequently in the past several months as drought in northern Kenya worsens. Reuters

Science, Studies, And Reports

After reviewing video footage, witness accounts, and satellite imagery, the United Nations Commission of Inquiry found the Syrian army responsible for airstrikes that damaged the Damascus water supply in late 2016. The damage, which the Syrian government initially blamed on rebel forces, left 5.5 million people without water for over a month. The New York Times

On The Radar

The Indian government introduced a bill that would establish a single standing tribunal for resolving river water disputes between Indian states. The current system, which requires a separate tribunal for each dispute, has proved largely inefficient. Hindustan Times

Circle of Blue

circleofblue.org

on this day 3/24 1988 – Former nsa Oliver North,John Poindexter and businessmen Richard Secord &Albert Hakim pled innocent to Iran-Contra charges.


1379 – The Gelderse war ended.

1545 – German Parliament opened in Worms.

1550 – France and England signed the Peace of Boulogne.

1629 – In Virginia, the first game law was passed in the American colonies.

1664 – A charter to colonize Rhode Island was granted to Roger Williams in London.

1720 – In Paris, banking houses closed due to financial crisis.

1765 – Britain passed the Quartering Act that required the American colonies to house 10,000 British troops in public and private buildings.

1792 – Benjamin West became the first American artist to be selected president of the Royal Academy of London.

1828 – The Philadelphia & Columbia Railway was authorized as the first state owned railway.

1832 – Mormon Joseph Smith was beaten, tarred and feathered in Ohio.

1837 – Canada gave blacks the right to vote

1848 – A state of siege was proclaimed in Amsterdam.

1868 – Metropolitan Life Insurance Company was formed.

1878 – The British frigate Eurydice sank killing 300.

1880 – The first “hail insurance company” was incorporated in Connecticut. It was known as Tobacco Growers’ Mutual Insurance Company.

1882 – In Berlin, German scientist Robert Koch announced the discovery of the tuberculosis germ (bacillus).

1883 – The first telephone call between New York and Chicago took place.

1900 – Mayor Van Wyck of New York broke the ground for the New York subway tunnel that would link Manhattan and Brooklyn.

1900 – In New Jersey, the Carnegie Steel Corporation was formed.

1904 – Vice Adm. Tojo sank seven Russian ships as the Japanese strengthened their blockade of Port Arthur.

1905 – In Crete, a group led by Eleutherios Venizelos claimed independence from Turkey.

1906 – In Mexico, the Tehuantepec Istmian Railroad opened as a rival to the Panama Canal.

1906 – The “Census of the British Empire” revealed that England ruled 1/5 of the world.

1911 – In Denmark, penal code reform abolished corporal punishment.

1920 – The first U.S. coast guard air station was established at Morehead City, NC.

1924 – Greece became a republic.

1927 – Chinese Communists seized Nanking and break with Chiang Kai-shek over the Nationalist goals.

1932 – Belle Baker hosted a radio variety show from a moving train. It was the first radio broadcast from a train.

1934 – U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt signed a bill granting future independence to the Philippines.

1938 – The U.S. asked that all countries help refugees fleeing from the Nazis.

1944 – In Rome, The Gestapo rounded up innocent Italians and shot them to death in response to a bomb attack that killed 32 German policemen. Over 300 civilians were executed.

1946 – The Soviet Union announced that it was withdrawing its troops from Iran.

1947 – The U.S. Congress proposed the limitation of the presidency to two terms.

1954 – Britain opened trade talks with Hungary.

1955 – Tennessee Williams’ play “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” debuted on Broadway.

1955 – The first oil drill seagoing rig was put into service.

1960 – A U.S. appeals court ruled that the novel “Lady Chatterly’s Lover” was not obscene and could be sent through the mail.

1972 – Great Britain imposed direct rule over Northern Ireland.

1976 – The president of Argentina, Isabel Peron, was deposed by her country’s military.

1980 – In San Salvador, Archbishop Oscar Arnulfo Romero was shot to death by gunmen as he celebrated Mass.

1980 – “Nightline” with Ted Koppel premiered.

1982 – Soviet leader Leonid L. Brezhnev stated that Russia was willing to resume border talks with China.

1985 – Thousands demonstrated in Madrid against the NATO presence in Spain.

1988 – Former national security aides Oliver L. North and John M. Poindexter and businessmen Richard V. Secord and Albert Hakim pled innocent to Iran-Contra charges.

1989 – The Exxon Valdez spilled 240,000 barrels (11 million gallons) of oil in Alaska’s Prince William Sound after it ran aground.

1989 – The U.S. decided to send humanitarian aid to the Contras.

1990 – Indian troops left Sri Lanka.

1991 – The African nation of Benin held its first presidential elections in about 30 years.

1993 – In Israel, Ezer Weizman, an advocate of peace with neighboring Arab nations, was elected President.

1995 – Russian forces surrounded Achkoi-Martan. It was one of the few remaining strongholds of rebels in Chechenia.

1995 – The U.S. House of Representatives passed a welfare reform package that made the most changes in social programs since the New Deal.

1997 – The Australian parliament overturned the world’s first and only euthanasia law.

1998 – In Jonesboro, AR, two young boys open fire at students from woods near a school. Four students and a teacher were killed and 10 others were injured. The two boys were 11 and 13 years old cousins.

1998 – A former FBI agent said papers found in James Earl Ray’s car supports a conspiracy theory in the assassination of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

1999 – In Kenya, at least 31 people were killed when a passenger train derailed. Hundreds were injured.

1999 – NATO launched air strikes against Yugoslavia (Serbia, Montenegro, Kosovo and Vojvodina). The attacks marked the first time in its 50-year history that NATO attacked a sovereign country. The bombings were in response to Serbia’s refusal to sign a peace treaty with ethnic Albanians who were seeking independence for the province of Kosovo.

1999 – The 7-mile tunnel under Mont Blanc in France became an inferno after a truck carrying flour and margarine caught fire. At least 30 people were killed.

2001 – Apple Computer Inc’s operating system MAC OS X went on sale.

2002 – Thieves stole five 17th century paintings from the Frans Hals Museum in the Dutch city of Haarlem. The paintings were worth about $2.6 million. The paintings were works by Jan Steen, Cornelis Bega, Adriaan van Ostade and Cornelis Dusart.

2005 – The government of Kyrgyzstan collapsed after opposition protesters took over President Askar Akayev’s presidential compound and government offices.

2005 – Sandra Bullock received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

2006 – In Spain, the Basque separatist group ETA announced a permanent cease-fire.

2014 – It was announced that the U.S. and its allies would exclude Russia from the G8 meeting and boycott a planned summit in Sochi in response to Russia’s takeover of Crimea.