Mike Pompeo/teamtrump said Life begins at conception, with no exceptions- a reminder of the things Republicans keep targeting!


demsVrepub

The question is will Republicans force women back to the days of hangers and wires? 

Reproductive Rights

  • Life begins at conception, with no exceptions. (Nov 2010)
  • believes in torture
  • Trump CIA Pick Mike Pompeo Depicted War on Terror as Islamic Battle Against Christianity,” The Intercept, Nov 23, 2016.
    https://theintercept.com/2016/11/23/mike-pompeo-religious-war/
  • Voted YES on banning federal health coverage that includes abortion. (May 2011)
  • Didn’t disclose his dealings with China
  • Prohibit federal funding for abortion. (May 2011)
  • Prohibiting forced abortions by the UN Population Fund. (May 2011)
  • Sponsored prohibiting abortion information at school health centers. (Mar 2013)
  • Life and human rights begin at fertilization or cloning. (Jan 2013)
  • No family planning assistance that includes abortion. (Jan 2013)
  • Include pre-born human beings in 14th Amendment protection. (Feb 2015)

Environment

  • Stop considering manure as a pollutant or hazardous. (Sep 2011)
  • No EPA expansion of regulated waters. (Jul 2014)
  • Voted YES on opening Outer Continental Shelf to oil drilling. (May 2011)
  • Voted YES on barring EPA from regulating greenhouse gases. (Apr 2011)
  • Signed the No Climate Tax Pledge by AFP. (Nov 2010)
  • Member of House Committee on Energy and Commerce. (Mar 2011)
  • No EPA regulation of greenhouse gases. (Jan 2011)
  • Let states lease energy rights on federal lands. (Jun 2013)
  • Let wind energy production tax credit expire. (Aug 2014)

Budget

  • Voted YES on terminating the Home Affordable mortgage program. (Mar 2011)

Civil Rights

  • Voted NO on reauthorizing the Violence Against Women Act. (Feb 2013)
  • Protect anti-same-sex marriage opinions as free speech. (Oct 2013)
  • State definition of marriage supersedes federal gay marriage. (Jan 2014)
  • Voted YES on maintaining work requirement for welfare recipients. (Mar 2013)

Corporations

  • Voted YES on workforce training by state block grants & industry partners. (Mar 2013)
  • Repeal ObamaCare reporting requirements for small business. (Jan 2011)
  • Rated 0% by UFCW, indicating a pro-management voting record. (May 2012

Social Health Issues

  • Supports privatizing Social Security. (Nov 2010)
  • Denounce the Common Core State Standards. (Feb 2014)
  • Rated 0% by ARA, indicating a pro-privatization stance. (Jan 2013)
  • Secure our borders; stop rewarding lawbreakers. (Nov 2010)
  • Opposes a pathway to citizenship. (Nov 2010)
  • Stop releasing low-risk illegal immigrants. (Mar 2013)
  • Voted YES on the Ryan Budget: Medicare choice, tax & spending cuts. (Apr 2011)
  • Voted YES on repealing the “Prevention and Public Health” slush fund. (Apr 2011)
  • Repeal any federal health care takeover. (Jul 2010)
  • Opposes public option for health insurance. (Nov 2010)
  • Repeal the Job-Killing Health Care Law. (Jan 2011)
  • Remove all funding from the 2010 national healthcare law. (Jan 2011)

Govt and Foreign Policy

  • No recess appointments without Congressional approval.
  • Withhold UN funding until voluntary and program-specific. (Aug 2011)
  • Rated -5 by AAI, indicating a anti-Arab anti-Palestine voting record. (May 2012)
  • Oppose Arms Treaty that limits gun trade to Israel & Taiwan. (Nov 2012)
  •  

resource: ontheissues.org , theintercept.com

1967 ~ The Lovings ~On June 12th, 1967, the Court’s ruling declared all laws against interracial marriage in the United States to be unconstitutional – is on the ballot?


 visit Loving Day’s website.

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The Loving Story:

Richard P. Loving, and his wife Mildred, shown in this January 26, 1965 photograph, will file a suit at Federal Court in Richmond, Va., asking for permission to live as husband and wife in Virginia. Both are from Carolin County, south of Fredericksburg, Va., and were married in Washington in 1958. Upon their return the interracial couple was convicted under the state’s miscegenation law that bans mixed marriages. They received a suspended sentence on the condition they leave the state, but they now want to return to Virginia. (AP Photo)

With fight for same-sex marriage such a regular point of conflict today, it’s easy to forget about the first fight for marriage equality: interracial marriage. But while anti-miscegenation laws may seem like a relic of the past, it wasn’t until 2000 that Alabama became the last state to adapt its constitutional laws on interracial marriage.

In 1967, the United States Supreme Court put an end to the prohibition of interracial marriage in the monumental case of Loving v. Virginia.

The case was sparked by Mildred Loving, née Jeter, who after discovering she was pregnant traveled with boyfriend Richard Loving and from their home in Virginia to Washington, D.C. They made the move to evade Virginia’s Racial Integrity Act of 1924, which prohibited them from marrying John was a white male while Mildred was black and Native American.

Five weeks after their nuptials, they returned to Virginia. An anonymous tip led to a police raid. Instead of finding them having sex, which was another criminal offense at the time, they caught them sleeping in their marital bed. The couple was taken to jail after Mildred pointed out their D.C. marriage certificate. It was used as evidence of “cohabiting as man and wife, against the peace and dignity of the Commonwealth.”

The Lovings were sentenced to one year in prison, but it was suspended on the condition that the couple leaves Virginia and not return together for 25 years.

Initially they did just that, but by 1963, Mildred had enough and decided to write to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy. The letter inspired Kennedy to connect her with the ACLU, which took the case to the U.S. Supreme Court. On June 12th, 1967, the Court’s ruling declared all laws against interracial marriage in the United States to be unconstitutional.

While cases like Brown v. Board of Education or Rosa Parks’ stand against segregation are taught regularly in schools, the Loving case gets less attention. Thirty-six years after the trial, Ken Tanabe first learned of the case as a grad student and founded the Loving Day Project to commemorate the anniversary. He, like many others, discovered it by accident.

“I realized that I might not be alive today (along with millions of other Americans) if it wasn’t for this case and those that came before it,” Tanabe, who is mixed race, told AOL via email.

The project has since expanded from its humble roots in New York City across the nation and even around the world.

According to a recent Gallup poll, 11 percent of Americans do not interracial marriage. When the Lovings were arrested the numbers, disapproval ratings were 94 percent. The falling disapprove numbers may appear to be a victory, but Tanabe says they are still worth worrying about.

“When Barack Obama was elected president, some people thought that racism was ‘over.’ While his election was an important sign of progress, it’s dangerous to believe we can stop being vigilant and proactive,” Tanabe explained. “The stories surrounding Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, and so many others are some well-known examples. Racism also affects interracial couples and multiracial people every day.”

Rather than remain mutually exclusive, Loving Day embraced, and been embraced, by the LGBTQ community. On the 40th anniversary of the Supreme Court ruling, Mrs. Loving urged that gay men and lesbians should be allowed to marry. A march has been planned for this year’s Loving Day in Abilene, TX by Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG).

“We see Loving Day as an educational resource for everyone to learn more about the history of marriage and understanding it as a civil rights issue,” said Tenebe.

National attention turned to Loving v. Virginia in 2011 when ‘The Loving Story’ premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival and was purchased by HBO. This year, Jeff Nichols, writer and director of the Matthew McCounghey flick ‘Mud,’ announced he will direct a new Hollywood “Loving” film starring Ruth Negga and Joel Edgerton.

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Black History is American History

Voting is a Right NOT a Privilege ~~ The Struggle continues


votingTime to pass the Voting Rights Act, change redistricting rules, and make it easier for ALL Americans to VOTE

 America

Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” -George Santayana (16 December 1863 in Madrid, Spain – 26 September 1952 in Rome, Italy) was a philosopher, essayist, poet, and novelist. 

 On March 7, 1965, hundreds of brave unarmed nonviolent women and men dared to March for African Americans’ right to vote.

The fact is that less than 1% of eligible Blacks could vote or register to vote.

A group of people organized a Peaceful Protest: The March would start in Selma then move on to the state capitol in Montgomery.

However, as these peaceful protesters tried to cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge to Montgomery the police, seemingly already assuming a defensive posture; some on horses had, looking back, a predetermined tactical intervention plan against protesters. The protesters, mostly young African Americans also walked quietly with a mixture of older individuals and white Students as well: and as they did so police proceeded to try and control the protesters  which quickly resulted in the “excessive use of force.”

As protesters continued, it became clear that the excessive force was now an active use of police brutality and acts of murder; the grotesque beating of a young black leader of nonviolent protesting #RepJohnLewis had his skull cracked open among other injuries to his body.  These Montgomery officers were out to do harm as they surrounded and knocked out young protesters using their nightsticks,  sprayed water cannons at close range while others used tear gas.

These kids had no weapons; they did NOT fight back because they were not there to fight, but showed much courage and strength in the face of absolute brutal violence by an adversarial organization minorities are expected to respect. These men in police uniforms hired to protect and serve citizens were actually a force activated by the state to show physical power,  discrimination, and racism in all its worse forms.

We must never forget that some of our fellow  Americans died for our right to vote! In what was an attempt to March in peaceful disobedience quickly became an adverse harmful environment to young black and white women and men,  students from all backgrounds, folks who believed voting is a right had to quickly retreat while journalists and photographers became witnesses to the suffering violence and death.

The brutal reaction by the police was not only caught on tape it forced then-President Johnson,  once against civil rights programs as a Senator to call on Congress for equal voting rights for all on March 15.

SelmaMarch

The Voting Act of 1965 became a law on August 6; is a landmark piece of national legislation in the United States that outlawed discriminatory voting practices that had been responsible for the widespread disenfranchisement of African Americans in the U.S.

A day that started out peacefully quickly descended into an awful johnlewisbeatwithknightstickugly March of death for the right to vote called, “Bloody Sunday”.

Now, some 50 years later, a new “Jim Crow” era has emerged with a major step backward in the fight for civil and voting rights. Conservative states are targeting not only African Americans but Senior citizens, first-time voters, early voting, Students, low income, immigrants, and the undocumented though Republicans call them (illegals) Dreamers; some born or brought to the US as youngsters all victims of circumstance now voting age. Also, Governors from the Republican-controlled States are allowing election officials to purge voters, people without birth certificates were given limited or completely denied access to the voting booth failing to meet new voter ID regulations in time, and were treated like possible (illegals). This is the 21st Century; we should be on a progressive path toward equality for all not one that will re-engage folks in the act of racism or exclusion leading to suppressing participation in the election process. In 2017, Republicans tried to pass and or enforce new, even stricter voter ID legislation or influence their districts with strange redistricting rules and regulations.  While some judges … have struck down some of these restrictive laws that ultimately suppress the vote, it is clear the effort to shut people of colour out of the election process sadly continues.

We need to push back on all attempts to suppress the Right to Vote.

With so much at stake, it is time to stop sitting on the sidelines. If we are going to succeed, Conservative lawmakers NEED to hear our Voices.

We cannot turn back the clock on Voting Rights For the sake of the Next Generation

Thank You for Taking Action

     Takeaction2

~ Nativegrl77