Tag Archives: United States Environmental Protection Agency

did you know? … Our Environment


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Climate Change chief victims of global warming are women, we grow the food, walk miles for water and gather the firewood.

Fend off Allergies … by eating more leafy greens, having high levels of folic acid may decrease your risk of wheezing and silence some genes, including those of the immune system. author,Elizabeth Matsui MD

software program  www.GoodGuide.com  can calculate the impact of a product, created by Dara o’rouke,phd UC Berkeley, can help make smart choices,  done from your iPhone while shopping

Making a glass jar impacts our environment, you have to burn a gas furnace 24hrs at 2000 degrees, this consumes a  huge amount of energy.

According to the WTC wiping  your feet off before home entry can reduce tracking pesticides by 25%,removing shoes can cut the amount of dust by 10 times, clean carpets every 18months instead of every 12months and save $300

the EPA states the air indoors is 2 to 5times more polluted, install smoke/carbon monoxide detectors, open windows daily, buy air cleaning plants, english ivy, Philodendron, spider; green cleaning recipes at Planetgreen.discovery.com

Rachel Carson‘s book Silent Spring, an early voice for our environment in 1962..get it

Buy local … less packaging if you buy local, more fresh tasty choices …support local farmer’s markets and community gardens

Raising Beef accounts for 18% of global warming emissions worldwide

You can reduce your carbon footprint just by switching to vegetarian meals for 1day,save about 860calories &9pounds of carbon,if done for 2weeks, a reduction of carbon by 122pounds and 12,460calories, losing about 3lbs or more.

What’s in your water? a repost


by Mary Anne Hitt
Beyond Coal Campaign Director
Tell President Obama:
Heavy metals and toxic sludge don’t belong in our water!
Wastewater PipeTakea action!

If you’re drinking a glass of water, you might want to put it down before you read this email.

Burning coal for electricity produces ash and sludge full of arsenic, boron, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, and selenium. Where do you think it all goes?

That’s right — the same power plants that are causing asthma with their soot and wrecking our climate with their carbon are also dumping tons of toxins into our waters. And without federal rules to stop them, those plants would keep on sending toxic sludge into rivers and streams, where it threatens swimmers and boaters, poisons wildlife, and wrecks ecosystems.

Send a letter to President Obama and urge him to move ahead with plans for strong protections from toxic wastewater right away!

Power plants produce more toxic waste than any other industry in the United States, including the chemical, plastic, and paint manufacturing industries. They spew millions of pounds of pollutants into our waters every year — toxins that are dangerous even in very low concentrations. Your drinking water is safe because we do a great job of filtering and cleaning, but our wildlife and ecosystems aren’t so lucky.

The problem’s only getting worse as coal plants get older and dirtier. The EPA estimates that the amount of toxic wastewater from these plants is going to increase 28% over the next 15 years. That means more heavy metals and more toxic sludge in our waters — more contaminated rivers, more unhealthy streams, more poisoned wildlife.

Tell President Obama that now is the time — before it’s too late — to give us safeguards against toxic wastewater. Let him know that clean water is too precious to wait another day!

Every step we take toward clean air and water helps keep our communities and our environment healthy… and it also takes us one step closer to the clean-energy future where our nation finally realizes that coal’s real cost — in climate destruction, toxic water, and poison air — is simply too high.

Thanks for everything you do to protect the environment,

Mary Anne Hitt
Beyond Coal Campaign Director

P.S. Six letters are better than one! After you’ve taken action, please forward a copy of this message to five of your friends and family. Or spread the word on your social networks with the share buttons below.

The Clean Water Act 1972


Summary of the Clean Water Act

Quick Links

33 U.S.C. §1251 et seq. (1972)

The Clean Water Act (CWA) establishes the basic structure for regulating discharges of pollutants into the waters of the United States and regulating quality standards for surface waters. The basis of the CWA was enacted in 1948 and was called the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, but the Act was significantly reorganized and expanded in 1972. “Clean Water Act” became the Act’s common name with amendments in 1972.

Under the CWA, EPA has implemented pollution control programs such as setting wastewater standards for industry. We have also set water quality standards for all contaminants in surface waters.

The CWA made it unlawful to discharge any pollutant from a point source into navigable waters, unless a permit was obtained. EPA’s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program controls discharges. Point sources are discrete conveyances such as pipes or man-made ditches. Individual homes that are connected to a municipal system, use a septic system, or do not have a surface discharge do not need an NPDES permit; however, industrial, municipal, and other facilities must obtain permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters.

Compliance and Enforcement

History of this Act

More Information

The Office of Water (OW) ensures drinking water is safe, and restores and maintains oceans, watersheds, and their aquatic ecosystems to protect human health, support economic and recreational activities, and provide healthy habitat for fish, plants, and wildlife.

  • The EPA Watershed Academy provides training courses on statutes, watershed protection, and other key Clean Water Act resources.

Ford could turn Native American lands into toxic waste dump


a reminder a warning and a repost

For 25 years, Ford Motor Company dumped toxic waste from a nearby factory into New Jersey’s Ringwood State Park.

Members of the Ramapough tribe, who’ve lived on the land for generations, routinely fell ill from various poisons. Their children suffered nosebleeds any time they played outside.

Cancer rates in the area are elevated, and the Bergen Record found arsenic and lead one hundred times above safe levels in the nearby Wanaque Watershed, which supplies water to millions.

But instead of working to clean up the area, the Environmental Protection Agency is actually considering giving the land back to Ford to use it as a toxic waste dump.

There’s not much time left to protect the park — the EPA is announcing its plan in less than two weeks.

Edison Wetlands Association started a petition on Change.org asking the EPA to keep the park public and make Ford clean up the park for the public’s use. Click here to add your name to Edison Wetlands’ petition to demand the EPA protect Ringwood State Park from Ford’s continued pollution.   http://www.change.org/petitions/save-ringwood-state-park-dont-let-ford-motor-company-use-it-as-a-toxic-landfill

Right now, Ford is secretly lobbying both state and federal officials to gain the right to resume toxic dumping in the park. But a national outcry can outdo them.

Sign Edison Wetlands’ petition to the stop Ford from polluting before the EPA’s deadline in less than two weeks:

http://www.change.org/petitions/save-ringwood-state-park-dont-let-ford-motor-company-use-it-as-a-toxic-landfill

Thanks for being a change-maker,

– Corinne and the Change.org team